The Most Popular Lakeside Towns You Never Knew Existed

If you’ve been dreaming of dangling your feet off a dock with the sun warming your shoulders, there’s nowhere better to do it than at your own lake house. These charming lakeside towns are among the most searched on Trulia—and they all have lake homes for sale, meaning they could make your second-home dreams become a sunshine-filled reality.

Can’t you just imagine zipping into this little town in your flipflops for fireworks and popsicles? See available homes here.

Rome City, Indiana

A Midwestern lake town for nature lovers.

Indiana doesn’t share the same summer-destination reputation as its Great Lakes neighbors, but Rome City has Midwestern-getaway vibes to spare. Located on the inland Sylvan Lake in northeast Indiana (less than an hour from Fort Wayne), Rome City both offers outdoorsy activities and celebrates outdoorsy culture with the Gene Stratton-Porter State Museum and Historic site. This preserved home of Indiana’s most famous female conservationist, photographer, and author hosts workshops, cookouts, and outdoor music events all summer.

Sixteen miles of shoreline give Rome City residents room for waterskiing, fishing, or kayaking at home as well. There are plenty of cottages, farmhouses, ranch-style, and Colonial houses available both on and just off the water, and you can find some deals. You could build custom on a $10,000 lot or get a 1,600-square-foot three-bedroom on the water for $269,000.

Henrico, North Carolina

A rural setting for families, retirees, and Sasquatch, too.

There are few things as relaxing as sitting barefoot by the lake with a glass of sweet tea. And in the area around Henrico, North Carolina—a rural hamlet on Lake Gastonsecond-homebuyers are sure to find plenty of places to lift their glasses.

Lake Gaston spans five counties between northeastern North Carolina and southeastern Virginia and includes communities like Henrico, Littleton and Roanoke Rapids. While the towns themselves are small, there are around 150,000 retirees, families, and tourists who call the Lake Gaston area home.

Greet you summer neighbors over a BBQ lunch at Grandpa’s Kitchen or take a selfie with Bigfoot at the Cryptozoology & Paranormal Museum in Littleton, just a few minutes’ drive down the road. Henrico’s charm comes from its mix of residents—and its variety of homes, ranging from a large lakeside cottage on the waterfront for $499,900 to a 700-square-foot fisherman’s cabin for $112,000.

 

In Kimberling City, you can spend the afternoon on the lake and catch an evening concert in the city. See available homes here.

Kimberling City, Missouri

A hidden retreat just minutes from Branson.

For those who love the idea of a hidden lakeside retreat but don’t want to be too far from the bright lights of the city, try Kimberling City, Missouri. This town of 2,400, located on crystal-clear Table Rock Lake in the Ozark mountains, is just a 35-minute drive from Branson, Missouri, one of America’s favorite vacation hubs.

Ski-Doo riders can catch a wake in the morning and hop aboard the Time Traveler, the world’s fastest, steepest and tallest coaster at Silver Dollar City in the afternoon. By evening, theater lovers can take in 76 Country Boulevard, Branson’s main-street district— and still make it home by nightfall to watch the nightly theater: sunset from the dock.

Try a lakeside condo for $160,000 or enjoy the lake breezes and mountain views from a large, family home in the hills above the water.

 

Longville, Minnesota

An unspoiled resort nestled between the lakes.

Paddle a kayak into the quiet, misty waters at dawn or draw in a breath of the pure, fresh air in Longville, Minnesota, an unspoiled resort roughly four hours north of the Twin Cities.

Bounded by Leech Lake to the north, Hackensack to the west and Remer to the east, Longville is a quiet, uncrowded area where you can enjoy some of the best water recreation in the state. Campers love the area for the pristine woods, and kids of all ages join up for the weekly Turtle Races, held Wednesdays from June to August.

Homes reflect the natural beauty. With their abundance of wood and glass, structures like this $280,000 log cabin fit seamlessly into the landscape.

south haven, minnesota

Quintessential small-town America awaits in the itty-bitty lakeside community of South Haven. See available homes here.

South Haven, Minnesota

An ideal location for those who crave the quiet life.

The 192-resident town of South Haven is in Minnesota, about 20 miles south of St. Cloud. Surrounded by 26 lakes, all within a 10-mile radius, it’s an ideal spot for people looking for a quiet summer on the water.

Anglers target South Haven to cast their rods, especially Clearwater Lake (the largest in the area), which is abundantly stocked with bass, pike, walleye, bluegill, and crappie. But life in the super-small town isn’t antisocial. There are a couple of places to grab a hot meal in town—Mom’s Place and Bedrock Bar and Grill—and on summer Saturdays, you can put down the pole and visit the huge and busy Swappers Meet, a combination garage sale, antique store, and farmer’s market.

You can find a lakeside home in South Haven on a wooded lot for the mid-$300s or a rambler-style house at the water’s edge for $200,000.

nebagamon, Wisconsin

From summer parades to sunsets that’ll melt your heart, Lake Nebagamon is a summer-lover’s dream. See available homes here.

Lake Nebagamon, Wisconsin

A vacation spot that’s a slice of pure Americana.

Find a slice of pure Americana at Lake Nebagamon, Wisconsin. This lakeside village at Wisconsin’s northwestern tip (about 175 miles north of the Twin Cities), takes people from their harried daily lives and drops them into to a simpler time.

Here, you can enjoy melting ice cream cones, 4th of July boat parades and hikes with the family. And in the winter, cozy up to the fire with hot chocolate and marshmallows after a day of snowmobiling and ice sports.

The fireworks over the lake would be breathtaking from a historic home in the $150,00 range or choose a lakeside paradise, a modern luxury home with its own dock, for $749,000.

Graford, Texas

A premier resort in the heart of Texas.

Located about 60 miles west of Fort Worth, Graford is one of Texas’ premier resorts. Spa-goers can rejuvenate at one of its lavish hotels and spas, like the Lush Resort, a lakeside hotel with hammock-like lounges that invite napping.

Or for those who crave adventure over downtime, there’s the challenge of scuba diving or trail running in the hills above Possum Kingdom Lake, a waterway known for its breathtaking views and over 300 miles of shoreline.

If lake-house living, Texas style, is making your boots scoot, try an 800 sq ft vacation condo — or a multi-million dollar custom homes built right into the lake’s cliffs.

Deerwood, Minnesota

A year-round destination for fishing enthusiasts.
You know you’ve found Deerwood, Minnesota, when you see the Leaping Deer in Elmer Park, at the site of the old Deerwood Railroad Depot. Located 125 miles north of the Twin Cities, this tiny city fronts on Serpent Lake, a clear, fresh waterway with nine miles of shoreline.

More than 250 homes and cabins cling to the meandering lakeside, sheltered by towering birch, pine and oak forests. Campers and hikers take in the clear air and clearer water, while the kids work off their animal spirits at Traditions, a family fun center with mini golf, water wars and frozen yogurt.

Like nearby Clearwater Lake (about 100 miles south), Serpent Lake is home to many fish species, and hosts fishing tournaments like Bassmaster and an annual ice fishing competition, making it another year-round destination for anglers.

See how much it costs to live in:


METHODOLOGY: These locations represent 10 of the top 20 searched zip codes identified as lake house vacation home areas on Trulia. Lake house vacation home areas were identified as those where at least 25 percent of homes listed on Trulia are vacation homes.

Ready to start your summer home search? See what’s available, here on Trulia.

The post The Most Popular Lakeside Towns You Never Knew Existed appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

Baltimore Will Pay You To Fix Up a Historic Rowhouse

If everything you know about Baltimore comes from The Wire or Serial, you might be missing the bigger picture. The grim version of Baltimore portrayed in those popular series doesn’t do justice to this beautifully historic, delightfully cultural, and truly livable city. And Baltimoreans are so eager to spread the word about their beloved hometown, they’re offering serious housing incentivizes to those willing to commit to Charm City.

It’s an appropriate nickname. Baltimore’s famously charming rowhouses are at the center of the city’s Vacants to Value program, which has been restoring the homes and helping first-time homebuyers purchase them since 2010.

It’s a big help for first-time homebuyers in a tight real estate market. The median home list price for the Baltimore Metro area is up 2 percent year-over-year to $300,000. And while housing inventory is up 6 percent over last year, that’s a fraction of the inventory recovery happening elsewhere: nearby cities Washington D.C. and Silver Spring, Maryland are up 21.9 percent and 16.2 percent respectively, and the similarly-sized Portland, Oregon’s inventory is up 21.5 percent.

Think you might want to take advantage of this special program for first-time homebuyers?

Baltimore rowhouses

Here’s what life as Baltimore’s latest rowhouse resident might look like.


What Vacants to Value Offers Buyers

In a nutshell, Baltimore’s Vacants to Value gives eligible homebuyers $10,000 towards closing costs for the purchase of a formerly vacant home. A wealth of other city- and business-sponsored incentives are available too, which can add up to tens of thousands of additional dollars towards restoration costs—the only catch is that the buyer must be the primary resident of the home for at least five years after the closing.

Why the generosity? Vacants to Value is the brainchild of former Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and other city employees. Their goals were to help residents build wealth by helping them purchase properties in their neighborhoods and to attract new residents—and it’s been a huge hit.

“A lot of what Baltimore has done is cutting-edge in the urban development field,” says Tammy Hawley, chief of strategic communications for the Baltimore City department of housing and community development. “We are working towards deleting blight; we are streamlining bureaucracy—selling properties in receivership, getting places up to code, and into the possession of hard-working Baltimore residents.”

How far does that $10,000 go toward the total cost of a Vacants to Value home? While many of the blighted rowhouses have a listing price in the $5,000 to $10,000 range, after a city-managed renovation, the sale prices land around $100,000 to $140,000 (less than half the median list price for Baltimore Metro homes)—meaning that $10,000 toward closing costs can represent a sizable portion of the total cost.

Buying Into Baltimore

Jason Hill, 31, and his husband Nic Thornton, 36, were lured to Baltimore by the Vacants to Value program. “About five years ago, friends of ours started looking here, and we frankly thought they were crazy,” says Jason. “Then we realized that for the price of a crappy studio in D.C., we could own a gorgeous, three-story home … and our $100,000 house here would be $1 million in D.C.!”

But first, they were in for a bit of a journey with their selected property in Baltimore’s Greenmount West neighborhood.

“When we first saw our house, in 2015, it had no roof, and it had a family of feral cats living in it,” says Jason. “We were lucky enough to pair up with a developer who had an in-house architecture team, and a dedication to green construction materials.”

Today, he and Thornton love to spend their weekends checking out cool restaurants and bars that are popping up all over Baltimore. “Nic collects clippings on all the new places we need to try,” Jason says with a laugh. “He’s the cruise director!”

And though they have an hour commute each way to their jobs in D.C., the Amtrak station is a quick walk from their new home—a larger and more perfect-for-them home than they could have afforded anywhere else.

“Baltimore has a slew of great programs,” says Jason. “We are both highly indebted student-loan carriers, with no assets—the efforts of the City of Baltimore made homeownership a possibility for us in a way we never could have done on our own.”

First-time homebuyers in Baltimore

Jason Hill and Nic Thornton purchased their three-story Baltimore rowhouse for a fraction of they would have paid in Washington, D.C. where they work.


First-time homebuyers in Baltimore

What was once a roofless shelter for feral cats is now Jason and Nic’s gorgeous new Baltimore home.


Building Local Wealth, Too

One of the most innovative aspects of Vacants to Value is that while it does invite outside investment, it also focuses on growing wealth for existing residents. Ernst Valery—the managing partner of SAA|EVI, an urban-development company who works closely with the city to renovate vacant rowhouses says his primary focus is “investment without displacement.” Offering existing residents a pathway to homeownership is good for them, and it’s good for Baltimore.

Ernst compares giving Baltimoreans the opportunity to invest in their own city to allowing startup employees to invest in their company early on. “The way I see it, Baltimore City is currently ‘pre-IPO,’ and when it goes on the open market, it will be too late for low- to middle-income families: They will be priced out just like they currently are in cities like D.C., New York, San Francisco, L.A., and even Miami,” says Ernst. “This is a paradigm shift—and it’s so exciting to be a part of it in Baltimore.”

One of the newest Vacants to Value homeowners is Kiona Pearson. Unlike some other beneficiaries of the program, she earned the restoration of her three-story rowhouse in the Woodbourne-McCabe neighborhood the Habitat way—through a year’s worth of sweat equity, contributing labor to the renovation of homes all over Baltimore with Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake, including her own.

“I moved into my house in February, and absolutely love it,” says Kiona, who grew up on the other side of Baltimore. “At first, I was a bit trepidatious—I’m pretty much a girly-girl, and on my very first day, we were mixing mortar! By the end, though, I was a whiz with the screw drill!”

And she had no small job in front of her. When Kiona first saw her house, it was a shell—it had no roof, and there was a board over the basement to prevent treacherous falls. “Now it is beautiful, and so quiet,” she says. “I love it here.”

Kiona now encourages all of her friends to take advantage of the program while properties are still available. And that goes for out-of-towners, too. If now’s the time to invest in a growing, vibrant Baltimore, anyone with East Coast dreams might want to consider getting in on the ground floor. With $10,000 available—and potentially even more—there’s no time like right now.

First-time homebuyers in Baltimore
First-time homebuyers in Baltimore

Kiona Pearson invested a year of work renovating Baltimore homes with Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake, including hers.


Lifelong Baltimore resident and new homeowner Kiona love her home and recommends the Vacants to Value program to everyone.


If you’re more the small-town type, you’re still in luck. Small towns across the U.S. are offering homeownership incentives as well, including New Richland, Minnesota’s free land deal.

Envisioning yourself in another city? Check out what’s available in your future hometown on Trulia.

Methodology

The inventory and median home list price data come from Trulia’s inventory report. For our inventory metrics, we take a snapshot of listings each Wednesday in the middle month of the quarter. Quarterly inventory totals are based on the median of the count each Wednesday. Price is based on the median listing price of every active listing throughout the month. We measure affordability as the share of income needed to purchase the median-priced home, assuming a 20% down payment and the average 30-year fixed mortgage rate in each quarter as quoted by Freddie Mac in its Primary Mortgage Market Survey (PMMS). Household incomes are pulled from 1-Year American Community Survey (ACS) microdata. We inflation-adjust 2016 incomes to later quarters. We use 2016 5-Year ACS data to estimate property taxes and insurance rates.

The post Baltimore Will Pay You To Fix Up a Historic Rowhouse appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

Baltimore Will Pay You To Fix Up a Historic Rowhouse

If everything you know about Baltimore comes from The Wire or Serial, you might be missing the bigger picture. The grim version of Baltimore portrayed in those popular series doesn’t do justice to this beautifully historic, delightfully cultural, and truly livable city. And Baltimoreans are so eager to spread the word about their beloved hometown, they’re offering serious housing incentivizes to those willing to commit to Charm City.

It’s an appropriate nickname. Baltimore’s famously charming rowhouses are at the center of the city’s Vacants to Value program, which has been restoring the homes and helping first-time homebuyers purchase them since 2010.

It’s a big help for first-time homebuyers in a tight real estate market. The median home list price for the Baltimore Metro area is up 2 percent year-over-year to $300,000. And while housing inventory is up 6 percent over last year, that’s a fraction of the inventory recovery happening elsewhere: nearby cities Washington D.C. and Silver Spring, Maryland are up 21.9 percent and 16.2 percent respectively, and the similarly-sized Portland, Oregon’s inventory is up 21.5 percent.

Think you might want to take advantage of this special program for first-time homebuyers?

Baltimore rowhouses

Here’s what life as Baltimore’s latest rowhouse resident might look like.


What Vacants to Value Offers Buyers

In a nutshell, Baltimore’s Vacants to Value gives eligible homebuyers $10,000 towards closing costs for the purchase of a formerly vacant home. A wealth of other city- and business-sponsored incentives are available too, which can add up to tens of thousands of additional dollars towards restoration costs—the only catch is that the buyer must be the primary resident of the home for at least five years after the closing.

Why the generosity? Vacants to Value is the brainchild of former Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and other city employees. Their goals were to help residents build wealth by helping them purchase properties in their neighborhoods and to attract new residents—and it’s been a huge hit.

“A lot of what Baltimore has done is cutting-edge in the urban development field,” says Tammy Hawley, chief of strategic communications for the Baltimore City department of housing and community development. “We are working towards deleting blight; we are streamlining bureaucracy—selling properties in receivership, getting places up to code, and into the possession of hard-working Baltimore residents.”

How far does that $10,000 go toward the total cost of a Vacants to Value home? While many of the blighted rowhouses have a listing price in the $5,000 to $10,000 range, after a city-managed renovation, the sale prices land around $100,000 to $140,000 (less than half the median list price for Baltimore Metro homes)—meaning that $10,000 toward closing costs can represent a sizable portion of the total cost.

Buying Into Baltimore

Jason Hill, 31, and his husband Nic Thornton, 36, were lured to Baltimore by the Vacants to Value program. “About five years ago, friends of ours started looking here, and we frankly thought they were crazy,” says Jason. “Then we realized that for the price of a crappy studio in D.C., we could own a gorgeous, three-story home … and our $100,000 house here would be $1 million in D.C.!”

But first, they were in for a bit of a journey with their selected property in Baltimore’s Greenmount West neighborhood.

“When we first saw our house, in 2015, it had no roof, and it had a family of feral cats living in it,” says Jason. “We were lucky enough to pair up with a developer who had an in-house architecture team, and a dedication to green construction materials.”

Today, he and Thornton love to spend their weekends checking out cool restaurants and bars that are popping up all over Baltimore. “Nic collects clippings on all the new places we need to try,” Jason says with a laugh. “He’s the cruise director!”

And though they have an hour commute each way to their jobs in D.C., the Amtrak station is a quick walk from their new home—a larger and more perfect-for-them home than they could have afforded anywhere else.

“Baltimore has a slew of great programs,” says Jason. “We are both highly indebted student-loan carriers, with no assets—the efforts of the City of Baltimore made homeownership a possibility for us in a way we never could have done on our own.”

First-time homebuyers in Baltimore

Jason Hill and Nic Thornton purchased their three-story Baltimore rowhouse for a fraction of they would have paid in Washington, D.C. where they work.


First-time homebuyers in Baltimore

What was once a roofless shelter for feral cats is now Jason and Nic’s gorgeous new Baltimore home.


Building Local Wealth, Too

One of the most innovative aspects of Vacants to Value is that while it does invite outside investment, it also focuses on growing wealth for existing residents. Ernst Valery—the managing partner of SAA|EVI, an urban-development company who works closely with the city to renovate vacant rowhouses says his primary focus is “investment without displacement.” Offering existing residents a pathway to homeownership is good for them, and it’s good for Baltimore.

Ernst compares giving Baltimoreans the opportunity to invest in their own city to allowing startup employees to invest in their company early on. “The way I see it, Baltimore City is currently ‘pre-IPO,’ and when it goes on the open market, it will be too late for low- to middle-income families: They will be priced out just like they currently are in cities like D.C., New York, San Francisco, L.A., and even Miami,” says Ernst. “This is a paradigm shift—and it’s so exciting to be a part of it in Baltimore.”

One of the newest Vacants to Value homeowners is Kiona Pearson. Unlike some other beneficiaries of the program, she earned the restoration of her three-story rowhouse in the Woodbourne-McCabe neighborhood the Habitat way—through a year’s worth of sweat equity, contributing labor to the renovation of homes all over Baltimore with Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake, including her own.

“I moved into my house in February, and absolutely love it,” says Kiona, who grew up on the other side of Baltimore. “At first, I was a bit trepidatious—I’m pretty much a girly-girl, and on my very first day, we were mixing mortar! By the end, though, I was a whiz with the screw drill!”

And she had no small job in front of her. When Kiona first saw her house, it was a shell—it had no roof, and there was a board over the basement to prevent treacherous falls. “Now it is beautiful, and so quiet,” she says. “I love it here.”

Kiona now encourages all of her friends to take advantage of the program while properties are still available. And that goes for out-of-towners, too. If now’s the time to invest in a growing, vibrant Baltimore, anyone with East Coast dreams might want to consider getting in on the ground floor. With $10,000 available—and potentially even more—there’s no time like right now.

First-time homebuyers in Baltimore
First-time homebuyers in Baltimore

Kiona Pearson invested a year of work renovating Baltimore homes with Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake, including hers.


Lifelong Baltimore resident and new homeowner Kiona love her home and recommends the Vacants to Value program to everyone.


If you’re more the small-town type, you’re still in luck. Small towns across the U.S. are offering homeownership incentives as well, including New Richland, Minnesota’s free land deal.

Envisioning yourself in another city? Check out what’s available in your future hometown on Trulia.

Methodology

The inventory and median home list price data come from Trulia’s inventory report. For our inventory metrics, we take a snapshot of listings each Wednesday in the middle month of the quarter. Quarterly inventory totals are based on the median of the count each Wednesday. Price is based on the median listing price of every active listing throughout the month. We measure affordability as the share of income needed to purchase the median-priced home, assuming a 20% down payment and the average 30-year fixed mortgage rate in each quarter as quoted by Freddie Mac in its Primary Mortgage Market Survey (PMMS). Household incomes are pulled from 1-Year American Community Survey (ACS) microdata. We inflation-adjust 2016 incomes to later quarters. We use 2016 5-Year ACS data to estimate property taxes and insurance rates.

The post Baltimore Will Pay You To Fix Up a Historic Rowhouse appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

Baltimore Will Pay You To Fix Up a Historic Rowhouse

If everything you know about Baltimore comes from The Wire or Serial, you might be missing the bigger picture. The grim version of Baltimore portrayed in those popular series doesn’t do justice to this beautifully historic, delightfully cultural, and truly livable city. And Baltimoreans are so eager to spread the word about their beloved hometown, they’re offering serious housing incentivizes to those willing to commit to Charm City.

It’s an appropriate nickname. Baltimore’s famously charming rowhouses are at the center of the city’s Vacants to Value program, which has been restoring the homes and helping first-time homebuyers purchase them since 2010.

It’s a big help for first-time homebuyers in a tight real estate market. The median home list price for the Baltimore Metro area is up 2 percent year-over-year to $300,000. And while housing inventory is up 6 percent over last year, that’s a fraction of the inventory recovery happening elsewhere: nearby cities Washington D.C. and Silver Spring, Maryland are up 21.9 percent and 16.2 percent respectively, and the similarly-sized Portland, Oregon’s inventory is up 21.5 percent.

Think you might want to take advantage of this special program for first-time homebuyers?

Baltimore rowhouses

Here’s what life as Baltimore’s latest rowhouse resident might look like.


What Vacants to Value Offers Buyers

In a nutshell, Baltimore’s Vacants to Value gives eligible homebuyers $10,000 towards closing costs for the purchase of a formerly vacant home. A wealth of other city- and business-sponsored incentives are available too, which can add up to tens of thousands of additional dollars towards restoration costs—the only catch is that the buyer must be the primary resident of the home for at least five years after the closing.

Why the generosity? Vacants to Value is the brainchild of former Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and other city employees. Their goals were to help residents build wealth by helping them purchase properties in their neighborhoods and to attract new residents—and it’s been a huge hit.

“A lot of what Baltimore has done is cutting-edge in the urban development field,” says Tammy Hawley, chief of strategic communications for the Baltimore City department of housing and community development. “We are working towards deleting blight; we are streamlining bureaucracy—selling properties in receivership, getting places up to code, and into the possession of hard-working Baltimore residents.”

How far does that $10,000 go toward the total cost of a Vacants to Value home? While many of the blighted rowhouses have a listing price in the $5,000 to $10,000 range, after a city-managed renovation, the sale prices land around $100,000 to $140,000 (less than half the median list price for Baltimore Metro homes)—meaning that $10,000 toward closing costs can represent a sizable portion of the total cost.

Buying Into Baltimore

Jason Hill, 31, and his husband Nic Thornton, 36, were lured to Baltimore by the Vacants to Value program. “About five years ago, friends of ours started looking here, and we frankly thought they were crazy,” says Jason. “Then we realized that for the price of a crappy studio in D.C., we could own a gorgeous, three-story home … and our $100,000 house here would be $1 million in D.C.!”

But first, they were in for a bit of a journey with their selected property in Baltimore’s Greenmount West neighborhood.

“When we first saw our house, in 2015, it had no roof, and it had a family of feral cats living in it,” says Jason. “We were lucky enough to pair up with a developer who had an in-house architecture team, and a dedication to green construction materials.”

Today, he and Thornton love to spend their weekends checking out cool restaurants and bars that are popping up all over Baltimore. “Nic collects clippings on all the new places we need to try,” Jason says with a laugh. “He’s the cruise director!”

And though they have an hour commute each way to their jobs in D.C., the Amtrak station is a quick walk from their new home—a larger and more perfect-for-them home than they could have afforded anywhere else.

“Baltimore has a slew of great programs,” says Jason. “We are both highly indebted student-loan carriers, with no assets—the efforts of the City of Baltimore made homeownership a possibility for us in a way we never could have done on our own.”

First-time homebuyers in Baltimore

Jason Hill and Nic Thornton purchased their three-story Baltimore rowhouse for a fraction of they would have paid in Washington, D.C. where they work.


First-time homebuyers in Baltimore

What was once a roofless shelter for feral cats is now Jason and Nic’s gorgeous new Baltimore home.


Building Local Wealth, Too

One of the most innovative aspects of Vacants to Value is that while it does invite outside investment, it also focuses on growing wealth for existing residents. Ernst Valery—the managing partner of SAA|EVI, an urban-development company who works closely with the city to renovate vacant rowhouses says his primary focus is “investment without displacement.” Offering existing residents a pathway to homeownership is good for them, and it’s good for Baltimore.

Ernst compares giving Baltimoreans the opportunity to invest in their own city to allowing startup employees to invest in their company early on. “The way I see it, Baltimore City is currently ‘pre-IPO,’ and when it goes on the open market, it will be too late for low- to middle-income families: They will be priced out just like they currently are in cities like D.C., New York, San Francisco, L.A., and even Miami,” says Ernst. “This is a paradigm shift—and it’s so exciting to be a part of it in Baltimore.”

One of the newest Vacants to Value homeowners is Kiona Pearson. Unlike some other beneficiaries of the program, she earned the restoration of her three-story rowhouse in the Woodbourne-McCabe neighborhood the Habitat way—through a year’s worth of sweat equity, contributing labor to the renovation of homes all over Baltimore with Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake, including her own.

“I moved into my house in February, and absolutely love it,” says Kiona, who grew up on the other side of Baltimore. “At first, I was a bit trepidatious—I’m pretty much a girly-girl, and on my very first day, we were mixing mortar! By the end, though, I was a whiz with the screw drill!”

And she had no small job in front of her. When Kiona first saw her house, it was a shell—it had no roof, and there was a board over the basement to prevent treacherous falls. “Now it is beautiful, and so quiet,” she says. “I love it here.”

Kiona now encourages all of her friends to take advantage of the program while properties are still available. And that goes for out-of-towners, too. If now’s the time to invest in a growing, vibrant Baltimore, anyone with East Coast dreams might want to consider getting in on the ground floor. With $10,000 available—and potentially even more—there’s no time like right now.

First-time homebuyers in Baltimore
First-time homebuyers in Baltimore

Kiona Pearson invested a year of work renovating Baltimore homes with Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake, including hers.


Lifelong Baltimore resident and new homeowner Kiona love her home and recommends the Vacants to Value program to everyone.


If you’re more the small-town type, you’re still in luck. Small towns across the U.S. are offering homeownership incentives as well, including New Richland, Minnesota’s free land deal.

Envisioning yourself in another city? Check out what’s available in your future hometown on Trulia.

Methodology

The inventory and median home list price data come from Trulia’s inventory report. For our inventory metrics, we take a snapshot of listings each Wednesday in the middle month of the quarter. Quarterly inventory totals are based on the median of the count each Wednesday. Price is based on the median listing price of every active listing throughout the month. We measure affordability as the share of income needed to purchase the median-priced home, assuming a 20% down payment and the average 30-year fixed mortgage rate in each quarter as quoted by Freddie Mac in its Primary Mortgage Market Survey (PMMS). Household incomes are pulled from 1-Year American Community Survey (ACS) microdata. We inflation-adjust 2016 incomes to later quarters. We use 2016 5-Year ACS data to estimate property taxes and insurance rates.

The post Baltimore Will Pay You To Fix Up a Historic Rowhouse appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

What a $250,000 Home Looks Like in Every State

Whether you’re simply browsing or looking to relocate, we’ve scoped out a home for sale for $250,000 in each of the largest cities in every state for $250,000, which is just shy of the national median list price of $289,000. These homes range from from 900 square feet in New York City to 3,504 square feet in Wichita, KS, and show where you can get the most bang for your buck.

  •  

     



    $250K-in-Every-State-Birmingham-AL

    Alabama

    Alabama: Birmingham
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-in-Every-State-Anchorage-AK

    Alaska

    Alaska: Anchorage
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-in-Every-State-Phoenix-AZ

    Arizona

    Arizona: Phoenix
    Three Bedroom Home
    $259,000

  •  

     



    Arkansas

    Arkansas: Little Rock
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    California

    California: Los Angeles
    Three Bedroom House
    $255,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Denver-CO

    Colorado

    Colorado: Denver
    Two Bedroom Condo
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Bridgeport-CT

    Connecticut

    Connecticut: Bridgeport
    Nine Bedroom Townhouse
    $255,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Wilmington-DE

    Delaware

    Delaware: Wilmington
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Jacksonville-FL

    Florida

    Florida: Jacksonville
    Four Bedroom Home
    $254,900

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Atlanta-GA

    Georgia

    Georgia: Atlanta
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Honolulu-HI

    Hawaii

    Hawaii: Honolulu
    One Bedroom Condo
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Idaho

    Idaho: Boise
    Three Bedroom Home
    $259,900

  •  

     



    Illinois

    Illinois: Chicago
    One Bedroom Apartment
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Indianapolis-IN

    Indiana

    Indiana: Indianapolis
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Iowa

    Iowa: Des Moines
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Kansas

    Kansas: Wichita
    Five Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Louisville-KY

    Kentucky

    Kentucky: Louisville
    Two Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Louisiana

    Louisiana: New Orleans
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Maine

    Maine: Portland
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Maryland

    Maryland: Baltimore
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Boston-MA

    Massachusetts

    Massachusettes: Boston
    Three Bedroom Condo
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Detroit-MI

    Michigan

    Michigan: Detroit
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Minnesota

    Minnesota: Minneapolis
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Jackson-MS

    Mississippi

    Mississippi: Jackson
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Kansas-City-MO

    Missouri

    Missouri: Kansas City
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Montana

    Montana: Billings
    Two Bedroom Townhouse
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Omaha-NE

    Nebraska

    Nebraska: Omaha
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Nevada

  •  

     



    New Hampshire

    New Hampshire: Manchester
    Two Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    New Jersey

    New Jersey: Newark
    Three Bedroom Townhouse
    $259,800

  •  

     



    New Mexico

    New Mexico: Albuquerque
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-New York-NY

    New York

    New York: New York
    Three Bedroom Coop
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Charlotte-NC

    North Carolina

    North Carolina: Charlotte
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Fargo-ND

    North Dakota

    North Dakota: Fargo
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Columbus-OH

    Ohio

    Ohio: Columbus
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Oklahoma-City-OK

    Oklahoma

    Oklahoma: Oklahoma City
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Portland-OR

    Oregon

    Oregon: Portland
    Two Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Pennslyvania

    Pennslyvania: Philadelphia
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Providence-RI

    Rhode Island

    Rhode Island: Providence
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Charleston-SC

    South Carolina

    South Carolina: Charleston
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Sioux-Falls-SD

    South Dakota

    South Dakota: Sioux Falls
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Nashville-TN

    Tennessee

    Tennessee: Nashville
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Houston-TX

    Texas

    Texas: Houston
    Two Bedroom Apartment
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Salt-Lake-City-UT

    Utah

    Utah: Salt Lake City
    Three Bedroom House
    $255,000

  •  

     



    Vermont

    Vermont: Burlington
    Three Bedroom Townhouse
    $270,000

  •  

     



    Virginia

    Virginia: Virginia Beach
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Washington

    Washington: Seattle
    Two Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Washington-D.C.

    Washington, D.C.

    Washington, D.C.
    Studio Apartment
    $259,999

  •  

     



    Wisconsin

    Wisconsin: Milwaukee
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Wyoming

    Wyoming: Cheyenne
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

Any cities on the list that excite or surprise you? Comment below and let us know!

The post What a $250,000 Home Looks Like in Every State appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

What a $250,000 Home Looks Like in Every State

Whether you’re simply browsing or looking to relocate, we’ve scoped out a home for sale for $250,000 in each of the largest cities in every state for $250,000, which is just shy of the national median list price of $289,000. These homes range from from 900 square feet in New York City to 3,504 square feet in Wichita, KS, and show where you can get the most bang for your buck.

  •  

     



    $250K-in-Every-State-Birmingham-AL

    Alabama

    Alabama: Birmingham
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-in-Every-State-Anchorage-AK

    Alaska

    Alaska: Anchorage
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-in-Every-State-Phoenix-AZ

    Arizona

    Arizona: Phoenix
    Three Bedroom Home
    $259,000

  •  

     



    Arkansas

    Arkansas: Little Rock
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    California

    California: Los Angeles
    Three Bedroom House
    $255,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Denver-CO

    Colorado

    Colorado: Denver
    Two Bedroom Condo
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Bridgeport-CT

    Connecticut

    Connecticut: Bridgeport
    Nine Bedroom Townhouse
    $255,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Wilmington-DE

    Delaware

    Delaware: Wilmington
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Jacksonville-FL

    Florida

    Florida: Jacksonville
    Four Bedroom Home
    $254,900

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Atlanta-GA

    Georgia

    Georgia: Atlanta
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Honolulu-HI

    Hawaii

    Hawaii: Honolulu
    One Bedroom Condo
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Idaho

    Idaho: Boise
    Three Bedroom Home
    $259,900

  •  

     



    Illinois

    Illinois: Chicago
    One Bedroom Apartment
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Indianapolis-IN

    Indiana

    Indiana: Indianapolis
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Iowa

    Iowa: Des Moines
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Kansas

    Kansas: Wichita
    Five Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Louisville-KY

    Kentucky

    Kentucky: Louisville
    Two Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Louisiana

    Louisiana: New Orleans
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Maine

    Maine: Portland
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Maryland

    Maryland: Baltimore
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Boston-MA

    Massachusetts

    Massachusettes: Boston
    Three Bedroom Condo
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Detroit-MI

    Michigan

    Michigan: Detroit
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Minnesota

    Minnesota: Minneapolis
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Jackson-MS

    Mississippi

    Mississippi: Jackson
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Kansas-City-MO

    Missouri

    Missouri: Kansas City
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Montana

    Montana: Billings
    Two Bedroom Townhouse
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Omaha-NE

    Nebraska

    Nebraska: Omaha
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Nevada

  •  

     



    New Hampshire

    New Hampshire: Manchester
    Two Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    New Jersey

    New Jersey: Newark
    Three Bedroom Townhouse
    $259,800

  •  

     



    New Mexico

    New Mexico: Albuquerque
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-New York-NY

    New York

    New York: New York
    Three Bedroom Coop
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Charlotte-NC

    North Carolina

    North Carolina: Charlotte
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Fargo-ND

    North Dakota

    North Dakota: Fargo
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Columbus-OH

    Ohio

    Ohio: Columbus
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Oklahoma-City-OK

    Oklahoma

    Oklahoma: Oklahoma City
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Portland-OR

    Oregon

    Oregon: Portland
    Two Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Pennslyvania

    Pennslyvania: Philadelphia
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Providence-RI

    Rhode Island

    Rhode Island: Providence
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Charleston-SC

    South Carolina

    South Carolina: Charleston
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Sioux-Falls-SD

    South Dakota

    South Dakota: Sioux Falls
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Nashville-TN

    Tennessee

    Tennessee: Nashville
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Houston-TX

    Texas

    Texas: Houston
    Two Bedroom Apartment
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Salt-Lake-City-UT

    Utah

    Utah: Salt Lake City
    Three Bedroom House
    $255,000

  •  

     



    Vermont

    Vermont: Burlington
    Three Bedroom Townhouse
    $270,000

  •  

     



    Virginia

    Virginia: Virginia Beach
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Washington

    Washington: Seattle
    Two Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Washington-D.C.

    Washington, D.C.

    Washington, D.C.
    Studio Apartment
    $259,999

  •  

     



    Wisconsin

    Wisconsin: Milwaukee
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Wyoming

    Wyoming: Cheyenne
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

Any cities on the list that excite or surprise you? Comment below and let us know!

The post What a $250,000 Home Looks Like in Every State appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

What a $250,000 Home Looks Like in Every State

Whether you’re simply browsing or looking to relocate, we’ve scoped out a home for sale for $250,000 in each of the largest cities in every state for $250,000, which is just shy of the national median list price of $289,000. These homes range from from 900 square feet in New York City to 3,504 square feet in Wichita, KS, and show where you can get the most bang for your buck.

  •  

     



    $250K-in-Every-State-Birmingham-AL

    Alabama

    Alabama: Birmingham
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-in-Every-State-Anchorage-AK

    Alaska

    Alaska: Anchorage
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-in-Every-State-Phoenix-AZ

    Arizona

    Arizona: Phoenix
    Three Bedroom Home
    $259,000

  •  

     



    Arkansas

    Arkansas: Little Rock
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    California

    California: Los Angeles
    Three Bedroom House
    $255,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Denver-CO

    Colorado

    Colorado: Denver
    Two Bedroom Condo
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Bridgeport-CT

    Connecticut

    Connecticut: Bridgeport
    Nine Bedroom Townhouse
    $255,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Wilmington-DE

    Delaware

    Delaware: Wilmington
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Jacksonville-FL

    Florida

    Florida: Jacksonville
    Four Bedroom Home
    $254,900

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Atlanta-GA

    Georgia

    Georgia: Atlanta
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Honolulu-HI

    Hawaii

    Hawaii: Honolulu
    One Bedroom Condo
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Idaho

    Idaho: Boise
    Three Bedroom Home
    $259,900

  •  

     



    Illinois

    Illinois: Chicago
    One Bedroom Apartment
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Indianapolis-IN

    Indiana

    Indiana: Indianapolis
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Iowa

    Iowa: Des Moines
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Kansas

    Kansas: Wichita
    Five Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Louisville-KY

    Kentucky

    Kentucky: Louisville
    Two Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Louisiana

    Louisiana: New Orleans
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Maine

    Maine: Portland
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Maryland

    Maryland: Baltimore
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Boston-MA

    Massachusetts

    Massachusettes: Boston
    Three Bedroom Condo
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Detroit-MI

    Michigan

    Michigan: Detroit
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Minnesota

    Minnesota: Minneapolis
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Jackson-MS

    Mississippi

    Mississippi: Jackson
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Kansas-City-MO

    Missouri

    Missouri: Kansas City
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Montana

    Montana: Billings
    Two Bedroom Townhouse
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Omaha-NE

    Nebraska

    Nebraska: Omaha
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Nevada

  •  

     



    New Hampshire

    New Hampshire: Manchester
    Two Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    New Jersey

    New Jersey: Newark
    Three Bedroom Townhouse
    $259,800

  •  

     



    New Mexico

    New Mexico: Albuquerque
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-New York-NY

    New York

    New York: New York
    Three Bedroom Coop
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Charlotte-NC

    North Carolina

    North Carolina: Charlotte
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Fargo-ND

    North Dakota

    North Dakota: Fargo
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Columbus-OH

    Ohio

    Ohio: Columbus
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Oklahoma-City-OK

    Oklahoma

    Oklahoma: Oklahoma City
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Portland-OR

    Oregon

    Oregon: Portland
    Two Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Pennslyvania

    Pennslyvania: Philadelphia
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Providence-RI

    Rhode Island

    Rhode Island: Providence
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Charleston-SC

    South Carolina

    South Carolina: Charleston
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Sioux-Falls-SD

    South Dakota

    South Dakota: Sioux Falls
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Nashville-TN

    Tennessee

    Tennessee: Nashville
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Houston-TX

    Texas

    Texas: Houston
    Two Bedroom Apartment
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Salt-Lake-City-UT

    Utah

    Utah: Salt Lake City
    Three Bedroom House
    $255,000

  •  

     



    Vermont

    Vermont: Burlington
    Three Bedroom Townhouse
    $270,000

  •  

     



    Virginia

    Virginia: Virginia Beach
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Washington

    Washington: Seattle
    Two Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Washington-D.C.

    Washington, D.C.

    Washington, D.C.
    Studio Apartment
    $259,999

  •  

     



    Wisconsin

    Wisconsin: Milwaukee
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Wyoming

    Wyoming: Cheyenne
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

Any cities on the list that excite or surprise you? Comment below and let us know!

The post What a $250,000 Home Looks Like in Every State appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

What a $250,000 Home Looks Like in Every State

Whether you’re simply browsing or looking to relocate, we’ve scoped out a home for sale for $250,000 in each of the largest cities in every state for $250,000, which is just shy of the national median list price of $289,000. These homes range from from 900 square feet in New York City to 3,504 square feet in Wichita, KS, and show where you can get the most bang for your buck.

  •  

     



    $250K-in-Every-State-Birmingham-AL

    Alabama

    Alabama: Birmingham
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-in-Every-State-Anchorage-AK

    Alaska

    Alaska: Anchorage
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-in-Every-State-Phoenix-AZ

    Arizona

    Arizona: Phoenix
    Three Bedroom Home
    $259,000

  •  

     



    Arkansas

    Arkansas: Little Rock
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    California

    California: Los Angeles
    Three Bedroom House
    $255,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Denver-CO

    Colorado

    Colorado: Denver
    Two Bedroom Condo
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Bridgeport-CT

    Connecticut

    Connecticut: Bridgeport
    Nine Bedroom Townhouse
    $255,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Wilmington-DE

    Delaware

    Delaware: Wilmington
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Jacksonville-FL

    Florida

    Florida: Jacksonville
    Four Bedroom Home
    $254,900

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Atlanta-GA

    Georgia

    Georgia: Atlanta
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Honolulu-HI

    Hawaii

    Hawaii: Honolulu
    One Bedroom Condo
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Idaho

    Idaho: Boise
    Three Bedroom Home
    $259,900

  •  

     



    Illinois

    Illinois: Chicago
    One Bedroom Apartment
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Indianapolis-IN

    Indiana

    Indiana: Indianapolis
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Iowa

    Iowa: Des Moines
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Kansas

    Kansas: Wichita
    Five Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Louisville-KY

    Kentucky

    Kentucky: Louisville
    Two Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Louisiana

    Louisiana: New Orleans
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Maine

    Maine: Portland
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Maryland

    Maryland: Baltimore
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Boston-MA

    Massachusetts

    Massachusettes: Boston
    Three Bedroom Condo
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Detroit-MI

    Michigan

    Michigan: Detroit
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Minnesota

    Minnesota: Minneapolis
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Jackson-MS

    Mississippi

    Mississippi: Jackson
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Kansas-City-MO

    Missouri

    Missouri: Kansas City
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Montana

    Montana: Billings
    Two Bedroom Townhouse
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Omaha-NE

    Nebraska

    Nebraska: Omaha
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Nevada

  •  

     



    New Hampshire

    New Hampshire: Manchester
    Two Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    New Jersey

    New Jersey: Newark
    Three Bedroom Townhouse
    $259,800

  •  

     



    New Mexico

    New Mexico: Albuquerque
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-New York-NY

    New York

    New York: New York
    Three Bedroom Coop
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Charlotte-NC

    North Carolina

    North Carolina: Charlotte
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Fargo-ND

    North Dakota

    North Dakota: Fargo
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Columbus-OH

    Ohio

    Ohio: Columbus
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Oklahoma-City-OK

    Oklahoma

    Oklahoma: Oklahoma City
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Portland-OR

    Oregon

    Oregon: Portland
    Two Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Pennslyvania

    Pennslyvania: Philadelphia
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Providence-RI

    Rhode Island

    Rhode Island: Providence
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Charleston-SC

    South Carolina

    South Carolina: Charleston
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Sioux-Falls-SD

    South Dakota

    South Dakota: Sioux Falls
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Nashville-TN

    Tennessee

    Tennessee: Nashville
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Houston-TX

    Texas

    Texas: Houston
    Two Bedroom Apartment
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Salt-Lake-City-UT

    Utah

    Utah: Salt Lake City
    Three Bedroom House
    $255,000

  •  

     



    Vermont

    Vermont: Burlington
    Three Bedroom Townhouse
    $270,000

  •  

     



    Virginia

    Virginia: Virginia Beach
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Washington

    Washington: Seattle
    Two Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Washington-D.C.

    Washington, D.C.

    Washington, D.C.
    Studio Apartment
    $259,999

  •  

     



    Wisconsin

    Wisconsin: Milwaukee
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Wyoming

    Wyoming: Cheyenne
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

Any cities on the list that excite or surprise you? Comment below and let us know!

The post What a $250,000 Home Looks Like in Every State appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

What Locals Love About Their Austin Neighborhoods

If you’re thinking about moving to Austin, one of the most important things to figure out is what neighborhoods might be a good fit for you. Do you want to be close to the action or somewhere quieter? Are you a family with kids or a recent college grad just starting to build your adult life? Austin has neighborhoods to suit almost anyone – but if you really want to understand what an area has to offer, you have to talk to the people who live there. Which is why Trulia has added a new feature – What Locals Say – to every home listing. More than fifteen million locals have shared insights about their neighborhoods, and an average of 100,000 reviews are being added every day. We used that data to identify four very special, and very different, Austin neighborhoods that you might want to consider in your home search.

What Locals Love About Bouldin

Best for: A taste of all the things that make Austin Austin

If some locals consider this hip enclave to be the best neighborhood in all of Austin, it’s for a good reason. Bouldin, a historic zone just across the river from downtown’s core, contains a taste of all of the things that make the city great. And while it has a reputation for being a paradise for young singles, it’s much more than that – which you find when you dig into the numbers.

Fans of urban living value one neighborhood characteristic above all others: walkability. And Bouldin sure is walkable. Want to be able to mosey to cool bars and hot restaurants? Check, according to 94% of residents, with almost the same number adding that the neighborhood is a safe place to walk alone at night – and a large majority appreciating the fact that even there are sidewalks, which is not a given in this car-oriented town. Interested in a tattoo? Bouldin has you (literally, if that’s your style) covered. Are you an Asian-food fan? Great, because Bouldin features some of the best Vietnamese and Thai restaurants in the city. Enjoy silence? So do your potential neighbors, despite the lively shopping and dining scene on the main drags, with 82% describing Bouldin as quiet. Love dogs? A resounding 100% of locals who weighed in on the matter describe the hood as ‘dog friendly.’ And while 75% of residents say you are probably going to want to own a car, the same number note that you won’t need it for errands like grocery shopping. As one local puts it: “Living so near [downtown] and having the peace and quiet of a suburban neighborhood gives you the feeling that every day is a vacation. What a great place to live!


A main street in Bouldin



Locals love Bouldin’s walkability.

If you’re interested in more of what Bouldin has to offer, here are some key spots to check out during your visit:

  • Best mega-Austin-y restaurant: The popular and bohemian Bouldin Creek Cafe, which one local describes as ‘the best Vegan diner on earth”
  • Best Vietnamese restaurant: Elizabeth Street Cafe, which also serves delicious French-Vietnamese baked goods
  • Best castle: Bouldin Castle, a Franciscan monastery-turned-spectacular medieval-inspired home  
  • Best park: Town Lake Memorial Park, which hugs the Colorado river with spectacular views of downtown
  • Best concert hall: The Long Center for the Performing Arts
  • Best neon-sign gallery: Roadhouse Relics, where local artist Todd Sanders crafts vintage-style designs
  • Best landmark: The famous ‘Greetings from Austin’ mural
  • Second-best landmark: The statue of late blues-guitar master Stevie Ray Vaughan

A busy street in Bouldin

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What Locals Love About Hyde Park

Best for: Bookish, crunchy, and mellow families who want a small-town feel in the big city

If you are looking for a small-town feel, historic Hyde Park – which is overwhelmingly residential and full of turn-of-the-century homes – is the move. The neighborhood has a longstanding reputation for being brainy, with deep connections to the nearby University of Texas,  and a little bit hippy. But dig into the numbers and you’ll find one of the most interesting residential zones in the city.

Victorian mansions meet modest bungalows in this leafy, historically protected district. But even though it is mostly residential, locals love the Hyde Park’s convenience to all key amenities. More than 95% of residents say that grocery shopping and dining are within easy walking distance (although this is still car-oriented Austin and 93% say you need a car). That urban feeling has some trade-offs, though, with less than half of residents finding their neighbors friendly or lauding their “holiday spirit.” But everyone loves dogs, with 100% claiming dog-friendliness, and even if you need to have a car, a solid 85% say that parking is no problem. As one local fan proclaims, “Great homes with character, walkable, friendly neighbors. The best!”


A Hyde Park local establishment



Quack’s Bakery is a Hyde Park staple.

Considering living in Hyde Park and planning on swinging by the neighborhood? Here are some things to look for:

  • Best bakery: Get a cupcake at Quack’s 43rd Street Bakery
  • Best coffee spot: Flightpath Coffeehouse, where the beard-and-glasses crowd huddle around Macbooks working on their dissertations  
  • Best historic home-turned-museum: The Elisabet Ney Museum, former home and workplace of the acclaimed German-American sculptor
  • Best hippie cafe: Mother’s, a classic vegetarian spot
  • Best comedy club: ColdTowne Theater, where you can also take an improv class
  • Best diner: Every neighborhood should have a diner, and the Omlettery is Hyde Park’s
  • Best import: In N’ Out Burger

Tree lined street in Hyde Park

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What Locals Love About Old West Austin

Best for: Hip families with young kids who love urban amenities

Back in 1991, Richard Linklater put both Austin and a certain style of local resident on the map with his groundbreaking feature-film debut, Slacker. And if you want to feel like you are a part of that movie, you could do worse than moving to – and spending your days drifting though – lovely Old West Austin’s vintage record stores, thrift shops, blues bars, and hip locavore restaurants. The ‘old’ part of the neighborhood’s name tells a big part of the story – it is one of the oldest areas in Austin, and its historic housing stock is protected by landmark laws. In part because of its location just west of downtown, Old West Austin also has a reputation for being a place that younger people, often just out of college, gravitate to, but if you talk to the locals and look art the numbers you’ll find a different story.

While Old West Austin is a great fit for young singles, it really shines as family neighborhood. A large majority of residents say that it’s safe for kids to play outside, which isn’t true of many nearby areas. They also agree that neighbors are friendly, holiday spirit abounds, dogs are loved, and it is safe to walk through at night. While virtually everyone agrees that you’ll need a car, 98% say parking is easy, and once you are in the neighborhood and looking for evening or weekend activities, you won’t need it much: 96% say grocery shopping is an easy walk, and 88% say the same of dining out. Parks, playground and hiking and biking trails abound. As one enthused resident puts it: “Dogs, people, location is great! Really special place that I can’t imagine living elsewhere! Never moving!”





Residents get a taste of Old West Austin in this rustic establishment.

If you want to get a taste of Old West Austin, here are some spots to check out:

  • Best vintage soda fountain: Grab a burger and a shake at Nau’s Enfield Drug’s vintage lunch counter in the back of a pharmacy
  • Best beer and wine bar: Chill out on the patio at Mean Eyed Cat
  • Best beach: Rent a kayak, ride a bike, or just catch a tan at Ladybird Lake-Lamar Beach Metro Park
  • Best bookstore: Bookpeople is a locally owned classic
  • Best record store: Waterloo Records is the indie record store of your Slacker-inspired dreams
  • Best Locavore restaurant: Get a reservation at Wink, a neighborhood institution
  • Best coffee spot: Caffe Medici

Locals kayaking and paddle boarding in Old West Austin

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What Locals Love About Allandale

Best for: Families looking for suburban amenities with a dash of Austin weird

This affluent north-central Austin neighborhood has everything a professional family might need: good schools, a wide variety of single-family homes on good-sized lots, parks and easy access to shopping an amenities. But it’s still Austin – and that means that there aren’t just Walmarts (although there is one of those) – there are also plenty of vibe-y bars, shops, and locavore restaurants. The neighborhood is also well served by public transportation, and sporty commuters have the option of a bike path that takes you all the way downtown. And if you talk to the locals and look at the numbers, you’ll understand why this is such a special place to live.

Everything a growing family might care about are the areas in which Allandale excels. More than 80% say that kids are safe to play outside – a high number for Austin. More than 95% say that yards are well-tended, parking is a breeze, and dogs are loved. More than 90% love the sidewalks and walkable grocery shopping. And a large majority say they are in for the long haul – with 79% saying they plan to remain in the area for at least five years. As one resident puts it, “I love this area! It’s close to everything and still secluded from the hustle of the city. The neighbors are super friendly.”


Austin Spider Tree



Allandale keeps Austin weird with their Austin Spider Tree.

If you’re considering Allandale, here are some neighborhood highlights to consider:

  • Best donuts: Gourdough’s has a wide variety of sweet treats
  • Best tiny pies: Tiny Pies bakes sweet and savory personal-sized pies
  • Best Mexican-Korean fusion: Get Korean barbecue in a taco at Chi’lantro
  • Best outdoor hang: Yard Bar is a dog-friendly spot for local beers and bites
  • Best Park: Sheffield Northwest Park’s playgrounds, lake, and tennis courts are the heart of the neighborhood
  • Best refurbished gas station: Phil’s Ice House, where you can grab a solid burger

A main street in Allandale

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The post What Locals Love About Their Austin Neighborhoods appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

The Place Generation

Place matters to young adults. So much so that they are building their lives around the cities and neighborhoods where they want to live—not where they need to live for a job. In fact, just 11.9 percent of millennials cite a new position or a work transfer as their reason for a move.

What draws them to their ideal city? Our data show that for millennial homeowners, what’s happening outside their door—like shopping, dining, and community events—factors into their home-buying decisions more than the older generations.

Moving to a city for the lifestyle it offers and building a life and career around it requires a little bit of guts and certain amount of strategy. Here are five people who did it—and how they pulled it off.


Tara Mackay

Los Angeles, California

What Tara Mackey did seven years ago—quitting a prestigious job at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City to drive cross-country to California with no job and $300 in her pocket—might sound unwise at best. But, Mackey, 31, had chronic health problems for which she was taking a staggering 14 prescription medications a day. The sunny Los Angeles lifestyle called to her.

“I wanted to learn about alternative therapies, from herbs to Ayurveda, and to study yoga and meditation,” she says, “and California seemed like the perfect place to do just that.”

Quickly, Tara was able to find holistic solutions to treat her illnesses, is now prescription-free, and has since started a wildly popular blog, The Organic Life. She’s also written two best-selling natural-healing books and launched a skincare line—all of which she attributes to wisdom she’s gained in her adopted home.

“It was so much better here than what I was expecting,” Tara says. “Imagine feeling sick for 25 years, and then finally finding a solution and regaining your health? Every single day I wake up and it is sunny and beautiful—I get up, I take the pups on a hike, do interviews, email, write. I am such a hippie, and it suits me here.”


Taylor Griffin

Bushwick, New York

A native of California, Taylor Griffin went to college and lived for a few years post-graduation in the Pacific Northwest. But it just wasn’t the right fit for him. “I had long been thinking about NYC as a dream—and I was 25, and I thought, if I didn’t do it now, I never will.”

He did it—with a duffle bag in tow, and with the help of friends who shared their couches while he found a place. Why was the move worth it? New York City’s active comedy scene. “Improv is my jam—basically my whole social scene is based on people I’ve met at UCB [Upright Citizen’s Brigade] classes,” Taylor says.

By day, Taylor is an Apple store manager in Manhattan. The job covers his bills in an apartment that he shares with two roommates in the popular Brooklyn neighborhood of Bushwick, which offers the fast-paced, access-to-everything, NYC lifestyle he wanted

“Hands down, my favorite part of living in New York is that there is always something to do,” Taylor says. “You could live here a lifetime and still discover new things to do, see, eat, smell, sit on, fall in love with, get mad at, wait in line for. It’s an entire world just a $2.75 metro fare away.”

Taylor’s big move and the pursuit of his craft are paying off in the city he has come to love, as he is now working on a comedic web series with his improv friends.


Ni’kesia Pannell

Atlanta, Georgia

Now 30, Ni’kesia Pannell grew up in Orlando, Florida where she got her Master’s degree in creative writing for entertainment. But Pannell set her sights on a place bigger than her hometown. At nearly twice the population, and with energy and culture to spare, Atlanta would be the perfect city for an entertainment-loving, style-conscious creative like herself.

“I called my mom to tell her I was moving, and she said, ‘What part of Orlando?’ She didn’t really believe me,” Ni’kesia says. She moved to the Northlake section of Atlanta in 2013, and she found her apartment—remotely from Orlando—by searching online and having a trusted friend go to check out apartments. However, despite her prestigious degree, once she got to Atlanta, finding a job wasn’t as easy as she’d imagined.

After bouncing from gig to gig for three years, she realized writing about her Atlanta lifestyle—music, relationship, and her faith included—was her passion. “I started my blog in 2014, and it changed everything for me,” she says. Soon after, she was in New York for Fashion Week and arranged a meeting with an editor at Essence. Now, she’s the magazine’s food and travel columnist.

“I love the culture in Atlanta—you can’t get any of this, from music and fashion, anywhere else,” says Ni’kesia. “I go to a little spot called Cinco, just down the street from my apartment,” she says of her favorite restaurant. “I go there every Friday, and bring everyone who visits from out of town.” Today, Ni’Kesia lives in Marietta, which is five minutes outside of Atlanta proper. “My neighborhood is bustling,” says Ni’kesia, “I’m just a few minutes from Cumberland Mall and The Battery, where the spectacular new Braves stadium and lifestyle plaza has been built.”

Atlanta has even found its way into her professional work—Marietta Square in particular. “[It’s] where I go a lot to do photo shoots. It’s a little quieter, there are great little antique shops and record stores, and it’s a perfect place to grab a bite to eat.”


Alana Esposito

New York City, New York

Alana Esposito has lived plenty of places—including Greece and Paris—and has had plenty of jobs, from art-gallery administrator to freelance writer. But her heart has always been in the Big Apple.

“I grew up in Providence, Rhode Island, but my mom was from New York City,” says 33-year-old Alana. “I grew up visiting relatives in the city, and my whole life I knew I would eventually end up here.”

In 2015, she finally moved there. After a long apartment search, she ended up in a studio south of the West Village and north of Tribeca with an amazing rooftop.

“What I love about the city is that people feel free to be whoever they are, and, despite everyone seeming to be too busy to care about their fellow New Yorkers, people here do pull through for each other in dark times such as by volunteering to clean up and rebuild after Sandy,” Alana says.

She now owns an apartment on the border of Chinatown and the Lower East Side—it is a vibrant and culturally diverse area with global restaurants and magical little community gardens between the buildings.

Career-wise, Alana returned to her original field of study, international relations. “I work at a non-profit that is focused on the well-being of women around the world. Because of the time difference, I am sometimes on calls from 11 p.m. to 2:30 a.m., but that’s New York, and the subway’s always running and hailing a taxi is easy!”


Kate Brannen

Washington, D.C.

Just 25, Kate Brannen graduated from the University of Oklahoma with a dual major in PR and women’s representation in the media. She moved to Washington, D.C., soon after she got her degree, without any job prospects and not knowing a soul in the city, and ended up in the Vienna, Virginia area of Metro D.C. “It was super convenient because it was right across from the metro station and above a grocery store, and just a few blocks from the Mosaic District which has great restaurants, a movie theater, and shopping,” Kate says. From the beginning, she just knew D.C.’s career-focused, breakneck vibe was for her.

Brannen now lives in Arlington, Virginia‘s Courthouse neighborhood. “I love it,” she says. “People here work hard and play hard. Patios and rooftop happy hours are a way of staying sane. For me, it’s meeting friends in Clarendon for Wednesday night bingo, grabbing a drink at Courthaus Social or canceling out any workout with Fireworks Pizza.”

Sure enough, she eventually found just the kind of job she was hoping D.C. would have for her. “I started researching influencers online, and one posted a job,” Kate says. Her PR company does crisis counseling and marketing. Her favorite part of the job is the clients. “So many of them are involved in great philanthropy,” she says. “We work with the Olympics, we do a lot of pro-bono work, and that feels great.”

And the D.C. lifestyle is everything she imagined. “Living in Oklahoma, I had to drive everywhere, but here everything is so accessible,” Kate says. “I love that I can walk to work, jump on the metro for a short ride into D.C., and bike or run the miles and miles of beautiful trails that connect Virginia, D.C., and Maryland.”

How These Movers Made It Work

“Give yourself a good plan. Do your finances and stick to your home-buying goals.”

– TARA MACKEY

 

“Use every single network that you have—you never know who may have a friend or a relative with a place right where you want to be.”

– KATE BRANNEN

“Everyone gets happiness from different things. Pick something you have can control over. Things you can’t control? Relationships and jobs. Find something you are passionate about and focus on that.”

– TAYLOR GRIFFEN

“If you’ve moved to a new and unfamiliar place, and you’re supposed to be there, it will happen for you. Don’t let anyone, your family or friends, talk you out of your dreams.”

– NI’KESIA PANNELL

Want to make your big move?

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The post The Place Generation appeared first on Trulia's Blog.