Cindy Crawford And Rande Gerber Sell Their Malibu Home For $45M

Cindy Crawford and Rande Gerber are going strong. The world-famous supermodel and her entrepreneur husband just sold their four-bed, six-bath home in Malibu for a whopping $45 million. Technically it’s a loss for the duo, who bought the home for $50.5 million back in 2015 and intended to sell it at a profit after renovations. But we’re guessing they aren’t shedding any tears over this flop of a house flip!

Measuring 5254 square feet, this one-of-a-kind beach compound is set on three natural acres filled with mature trees, panoramic ocean views, and winding walkways to the sandy beach. Guests enter through the long driveway, which winds past a tennis court to the newly-renovated, architectural-style home, which was originally built in 1944. On the main floor, a great room with floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors provides panoramic views of Malibu’s sparkling beaches and ocean. A large kitchen with a breakfast bar and spacious island is the dream of any aspiring chef. The master suite is like a vacation in itself, thanks to a cozy fireplace, sitting area, two separate spa-like baths and roomy dressing closets. An additional room with beautiful ocean views currently functions as a media room, but could easily be converted into a home office or additional bedroom.

Just last year, the couple dropped $11.625 million on a sprawling estate in Beverly Hills. That home, which is located inside the coveted Trousdale Estates, was purchased from One Republic singer Ryan Tedder. The couple also owns two other properties in Malibu, including a beach house that can be yours for the low, low price of $19,500 a month.  Then there’s their property in Los Cabos, Mexico and a lake house near Ontario, Canada, because hey, everyone’s got to have options.

 

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What Locals Love About Their Austin Neighborhoods

If you’re thinking about moving to Austin, one of the most important things to figure out is what neighborhoods might be a good fit for you. Do you want to be close to the action or somewhere quieter? Are you a family with kids or a recent college grad just starting to build your adult life? Austin has neighborhoods to suit almost anyone – but if you really want to understand what an area has to offer, you have to talk to the people who live there. Which is why Trulia has added a new feature – What Locals Say – to every home listing. More than fifteen million locals have shared insights about their neighborhoods, and an average of 100,000 reviews are being added every day. We used that data to identify four very special, and very different, Austin neighborhoods that you might want to consider in your home search.

What Locals Love About Bouldin

Best for: A taste of all the things that make Austin Austin

If some locals consider this hip enclave to be the best neighborhood in all of Austin, it’s for a good reason. Bouldin, a historic zone just across the river from downtown’s core, contains a taste of all of the things that make the city great. And while it has a reputation for being a paradise for young singles, it’s much more than that – which you find when you dig into the numbers.

Fans of urban living value one neighborhood characteristic above all others: walkability. And Bouldin sure is walkable. Want to be able to mosey to cool bars and hot restaurants? Check, according to 94% of residents, with almost the same number adding that the neighborhood is a safe place to walk alone at night – and a large majority appreciating the fact that even there are sidewalks, which is not a given in this car-oriented town. Interested in a tattoo? Bouldin has you (literally, if that’s your style) covered. Are you an Asian-food fan? Great, because Bouldin features some of the best Vietnamese and Thai restaurants in the city. Enjoy silence? So do your potential neighbors, despite the lively shopping and dining scene on the main drags, with 82% describing Bouldin as quiet. Love dogs? A resounding 100% of locals who weighed in on the matter describe the hood as ‘dog friendly.’ And while 75% of residents say you are probably going to want to own a car, the same number note that you won’t need it for errands like grocery shopping. As one local puts it: “Living so near [downtown] and having the peace and quiet of a suburban neighborhood gives you the feeling that every day is a vacation. What a great place to live!


A main street in Bouldin



Locals love Bouldin’s walkability.

If you’re interested in more of what Bouldin has to offer, here are some key spots to check out during your visit:

  • Best mega-Austin-y restaurant: The popular and bohemian Bouldin Creek Cafe, which one local describes as ‘the best Vegan diner on earth”
  • Best Vietnamese restaurant: Elizabeth Street Cafe, which also serves delicious French-Vietnamese baked goods
  • Best castle: Bouldin Castle, a Franciscan monastery-turned-spectacular medieval-inspired home  
  • Best park: Town Lake Memorial Park, which hugs the Colorado river with spectacular views of downtown
  • Best concert hall: The Long Center for the Performing Arts
  • Best neon-sign gallery: Roadhouse Relics, where local artist Todd Sanders crafts vintage-style designs
  • Best landmark: The famous ‘Greetings from Austin’ mural
  • Second-best landmark: The statue of late blues-guitar master Stevie Ray Vaughan

A busy street in Bouldin

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What Locals Love About Hyde Park

Best for: Bookish, crunchy, and mellow families who want a small-town feel in the big city

If you are looking for a small-town feel, historic Hyde Park – which is overwhelmingly residential and full of turn-of-the-century homes – is the move. The neighborhood has a longstanding reputation for being brainy, with deep connections to the nearby University of Texas,  and a little bit hippy. But dig into the numbers and you’ll find one of the most interesting residential zones in the city.

Victorian mansions meet modest bungalows in this leafy, historically protected district. But even though it is mostly residential, locals love the Hyde Park’s convenience to all key amenities. More than 95% of residents say that grocery shopping and dining are within easy walking distance (although this is still car-oriented Austin and 93% say you need a car). That urban feeling has some trade-offs, though, with less than half of residents finding their neighbors friendly or lauding their “holiday spirit.” But everyone loves dogs, with 100% claiming dog-friendliness, and even if you need to have a car, a solid 85% say that parking is no problem. As one local fan proclaims, “Great homes with character, walkable, friendly neighbors. The best!”


A Hyde Park local establishment



Quack’s Bakery is a Hyde Park staple.

Considering living in Hyde Park and planning on swinging by the neighborhood? Here are some things to look for:

  • Best bakery: Get a cupcake at Quack’s 43rd Street Bakery
  • Best coffee spot: Flightpath Coffeehouse, where the beard-and-glasses crowd huddle around Macbooks working on their dissertations  
  • Best historic home-turned-museum: The Elisabet Ney Museum, former home and workplace of the acclaimed German-American sculptor
  • Best hippie cafe: Mother’s, a classic vegetarian spot
  • Best comedy club: ColdTowne Theater, where you can also take an improv class
  • Best diner: Every neighborhood should have a diner, and the Omlettery is Hyde Park’s
  • Best import: In N’ Out Burger

Tree lined street in Hyde Park

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What Locals Love About Old West Austin

Best for: Hip families with young kids who love urban amenities

Back in 1991, Richard Linklater put both Austin and a certain style of local resident on the map with his groundbreaking feature-film debut, Slacker. And if you want to feel like you are a part of that movie, you could do worse than moving to – and spending your days drifting though – lovely Old West Austin’s vintage record stores, thrift shops, blues bars, and hip locavore restaurants. The ‘old’ part of the neighborhood’s name tells a big part of the story – it is one of the oldest areas in Austin, and its historic housing stock is protected by landmark laws. In part because of its location just west of downtown, Old West Austin also has a reputation for being a place that younger people, often just out of college, gravitate to, but if you talk to the locals and look art the numbers you’ll find a different story.

While Old West Austin is a great fit for young singles, it really shines as family neighborhood. A large majority of residents say that it’s safe for kids to play outside, which isn’t true of many nearby areas. They also agree that neighbors are friendly, holiday spirit abounds, dogs are loved, and it is safe to walk through at night. While virtually everyone agrees that you’ll need a car, 98% say parking is easy, and once you are in the neighborhood and looking for evening or weekend activities, you won’t need it much: 96% say grocery shopping is an easy walk, and 88% say the same of dining out. Parks, playground and hiking and biking trails abound. As one enthused resident puts it: “Dogs, people, location is great! Really special place that I can’t imagine living elsewhere! Never moving!”





Residents get a taste of Old West Austin in this rustic establishment.

If you want to get a taste of Old West Austin, here are some spots to check out:

  • Best vintage soda fountain: Grab a burger and a shake at Nau’s Enfield Drug’s vintage lunch counter in the back of a pharmacy
  • Best beer and wine bar: Chill out on the patio at Mean Eyed Cat
  • Best beach: Rent a kayak, ride a bike, or just catch a tan at Ladybird Lake-Lamar Beach Metro Park
  • Best bookstore: Bookpeople is a locally owned classic
  • Best record store: Waterloo Records is the indie record store of your Slacker-inspired dreams
  • Best Locavore restaurant: Get a reservation at Wink, a neighborhood institution
  • Best coffee spot: Caffe Medici

Locals kayaking and paddle boarding in Old West Austin

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What Locals Love About Allandale

Best for: Families looking for suburban amenities with a dash of Austin weird

This affluent north-central Austin neighborhood has everything a professional family might need: good schools, a wide variety of single-family homes on good-sized lots, parks and easy access to shopping an amenities. But it’s still Austin – and that means that there aren’t just Walmarts (although there is one of those) – there are also plenty of vibe-y bars, shops, and locavore restaurants. The neighborhood is also well served by public transportation, and sporty commuters have the option of a bike path that takes you all the way downtown. And if you talk to the locals and look at the numbers, you’ll understand why this is such a special place to live.

Everything a growing family might care about are the areas in which Allandale excels. More than 80% say that kids are safe to play outside – a high number for Austin. More than 95% say that yards are well-tended, parking is a breeze, and dogs are loved. More than 90% love the sidewalks and walkable grocery shopping. And a large majority say they are in for the long haul – with 79% saying they plan to remain in the area for at least five years. As one resident puts it, “I love this area! It’s close to everything and still secluded from the hustle of the city. The neighbors are super friendly.”


Austin Spider Tree



Allandale keeps Austin weird with their Austin Spider Tree.

If you’re considering Allandale, here are some neighborhood highlights to consider:

  • Best donuts: Gourdough’s has a wide variety of sweet treats
  • Best tiny pies: Tiny Pies bakes sweet and savory personal-sized pies
  • Best Mexican-Korean fusion: Get Korean barbecue in a taco at Chi’lantro
  • Best outdoor hang: Yard Bar is a dog-friendly spot for local beers and bites
  • Best Park: Sheffield Northwest Park’s playgrounds, lake, and tennis courts are the heart of the neighborhood
  • Best refurbished gas station: Phil’s Ice House, where you can grab a solid burger

A main street in Allandale

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The post What Locals Love About Their Austin Neighborhoods appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

The Most Popular Lakeside Towns You Never Knew Existed

If you’ve been dreaming of dangling your feet off a dock with the sun warming your shoulders, there’s nowhere better to do it than at your own lake house. These charming lakeside towns are among the most searched on Trulia—and they all have lake homes for sale, meaning they could make your second-home dreams become a sunshine-filled reality.

Can’t you just imagine zipping into this little town in your flipflops for fireworks and popsicles? See available homes here.

Rome City, Indiana

A Midwestern lake town for nature lovers.

Indiana doesn’t share the same summer-destination reputation as its Great Lakes neighbors, but Rome City has Midwestern-getaway vibes to spare. Located on the inland Sylvan Lake in northeast Indiana (less than an hour from Fort Wayne), Rome City both offers outdoorsy activities and celebrates outdoorsy culture with the Gene Stratton-Porter State Museum and Historic site. This preserved home of Indiana’s most famous female conservationist, photographer, and author hosts workshops, cookouts, and outdoor music events all summer.

Sixteen miles of shoreline give Rome City residents room for waterskiing, fishing, or kayaking at home as well. There are plenty of cottages, farmhouses, ranch-style, and Colonial houses available both on and just off the water, and you can find some deals. You could build custom on a $10,000 lot or get a 1,600-square-foot three-bedroom on the water for $269,000.

Henrico, North Carolina

A rural setting for families, retirees, and Sasquatch, too.

There are few things as relaxing as sitting barefoot by the lake with a glass of sweet tea. And in the area around Henrico, North Carolina—a rural hamlet on Lake Gastonsecond-homebuyers are sure to find plenty of places to lift their glasses.

Lake Gaston spans five counties between northeastern North Carolina and southeastern Virginia and includes communities like Henrico, Littleton and Roanoke Rapids. While the towns themselves are small, there are around 150,000 retirees, families, and tourists who call the Lake Gaston area home.

Greet you summer neighbors over a BBQ lunch at Grandpa’s Kitchen or take a selfie with Bigfoot at the Cryptozoology & Paranormal Museum in Littleton, just a few minutes’ drive down the road. Henrico’s charm comes from its mix of residents—and its variety of homes, ranging from a large lakeside cottage on the waterfront for $499,900 to a 700-square-foot fisherman’s cabin for $112,000.

 

In Kimberling City, you can spend the afternoon on the lake and catch an evening concert in the city. See available homes here.

Kimberling City, Missouri

A hidden retreat just minutes from Branson.

For those who love the idea of a hidden lakeside retreat but don’t want to be too far from the bright lights of the city, try Kimberling City, Missouri. This town of 2,400, located on crystal-clear Table Rock Lake in the Ozark mountains, is just a 35-minute drive from Branson, Missouri, one of America’s favorite vacation hubs.

Ski-Doo riders can catch a wake in the morning and hop aboard the Time Traveler, the world’s fastest, steepest and tallest coaster at Silver Dollar City in the afternoon. By evening, theater lovers can take in 76 Country Boulevard, Branson’s main-street district— and still make it home by nightfall to watch the nightly theater: sunset from the dock.

Try a lakeside condo for $160,000 or enjoy the lake breezes and mountain views from a large, family home in the hills above the water.

 

Longville, Minnesota

An unspoiled resort nestled between the lakes.

Paddle a kayak into the quiet, misty waters at dawn or draw in a breath of the pure, fresh air in Longville, Minnesota, an unspoiled resort roughly four hours north of the Twin Cities.

Bounded by Leech Lake to the north, Hackensack to the west and Remer to the east, Longville is a quiet, uncrowded area where you can enjoy some of the best water recreation in the state. Campers love the area for the pristine woods, and kids of all ages join up for the weekly Turtle Races, held Wednesdays from June to August.

Homes reflect the natural beauty. With their abundance of wood and glass, structures like this $280,000 log cabin fit seamlessly into the landscape.

south haven, minnesota

Quintessential small-town America awaits in the itty-bitty lakeside community of South Haven. See available homes here.

South Haven, Minnesota

An ideal location for those who crave the quiet life.

The 192-resident town of South Haven is in Minnesota, about 20 miles south of St. Cloud. Surrounded by 26 lakes, all within a 10-mile radius, it’s an ideal spot for people looking for a quiet summer on the water.

Anglers target South Haven to cast their rods, especially Clearwater Lake (the largest in the area), which is abundantly stocked with bass, pike, walleye, bluegill, and crappie. But life in the super-small town isn’t antisocial. There are a couple of places to grab a hot meal in town—Mom’s Place and Bedrock Bar and Grill—and on summer Saturdays, you can put down the pole and visit the huge and busy Swappers Meet, a combination garage sale, antique store, and farmer’s market.

You can find a lakeside home in South Haven on a wooded lot for the mid-$300s or a rambler-style house at the water’s edge for $200,000.

nebagamon, Wisconsin

From summer parades to sunsets that’ll melt your heart, Lake Nebagamon is a summer-lover’s dream. See available homes here.

Lake Nebagamon, Wisconsin

A vacation spot that’s a slice of pure Americana.

Find a slice of pure Americana at Lake Nebagamon, Wisconsin. This lakeside village at Wisconsin’s northwestern tip (about 175 miles north of the Twin Cities), takes people from their harried daily lives and drops them into to a simpler time.

Here, you can enjoy melting ice cream cones, 4th of July boat parades and hikes with the family. And in the winter, cozy up to the fire with hot chocolate and marshmallows after a day of snowmobiling and ice sports.

The fireworks over the lake would be breathtaking from a historic home in the $150,00 range or choose a lakeside paradise, a modern luxury home with its own dock, for $749,000.

Graford, Texas

A premier resort in the heart of Texas.

Located about 60 miles west of Fort Worth, Graford is one of Texas’ premier resorts. Spa-goers can rejuvenate at one of its lavish hotels and spas, like the Lush Resort, a lakeside hotel with hammock-like lounges that invite napping.

Or for those who crave adventure over downtime, there’s the challenge of scuba diving or trail running in the hills above Possum Kingdom Lake, a waterway known for its breathtaking views and over 300 miles of shoreline.

If lake-house living, Texas style, is making your boots scoot, try an 800 sq ft vacation condo — or a multi-million dollar custom homes built right into the lake’s cliffs.

Deerwood, Minnesota

A year-round destination for fishing enthusiasts.
You know you’ve found Deerwood, Minnesota, when you see the Leaping Deer in Elmer Park, at the site of the old Deerwood Railroad Depot. Located 125 miles north of the Twin Cities, this tiny city fronts on Serpent Lake, a clear, fresh waterway with nine miles of shoreline.

More than 250 homes and cabins cling to the meandering lakeside, sheltered by towering birch, pine and oak forests. Campers and hikers take in the clear air and clearer water, while the kids work off their animal spirits at Traditions, a family fun center with mini golf, water wars and frozen yogurt.

Like nearby Clearwater Lake (about 100 miles south), Serpent Lake is home to many fish species, and hosts fishing tournaments like Bassmaster and an annual ice fishing competition, making it another year-round destination for anglers.

See how much it costs to live in:


METHODOLOGY: These locations represent 10 of the top 20 searched zip codes identified as lake house vacation home areas on Trulia. Lake house vacation home areas were identified as those where at least 25 percent of homes listed on Trulia are vacation homes.

Ready to start your summer home search? See what’s available, here on Trulia.

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We Graded College Housing Data, and Off-campus Gets an A for Affordability

Let’s face it, college is expensive these days. No matter where you go to school, the price of tuition, fees, books, and transportation add up. But there’s one place that you might be able to save big: housing. Trulia economists crunched the numbers behind housing affordability on the biggest campuses in America to compare on- and off-campus living spaces.

The results were nothing short of surprising. While rents are rising, so is the price of living on campus. “In 28 of the 48 places we looked at, it was either the same price or cheaper to be off-campus with an average savings of $219 per month with a roommate,” says Trulia economist Felipe Chacon.

Where can you find the best deals? Read on.

Tallahassee, Florida

On-campus: $875 ~ Off-campus: $593

Florida’s capital city is home to two major universities: Florida State University and Florida A&M. Yet, it’s not the typical Florida spot. You’re about a half hour from the closest beach, and the city is on the smaller side. (Some areas, like those near the A&M campus, feel downright rural.)

In College Town, the neighborhood that borders FSU, residents are paying more for rent than they used to. Rent went up 6 percent between 2012 and 2018. But they’re still saving $282 a month by opting for off-campus housing for $593 a month compared to $875 on campus.

You can make your budget go further if you want to hang out on W. Gaines Street, the popular entertainment district for the college crowd. Between the free concerts offered at the amphitheater at Cascades Park and value menu at Gumby’s Pizza, you can have fun on the cheap in Tallahassee.

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Madison, Wisconsin

On-campus: $866 ~ Off-campus: $865

Home to the University of Wisconsin – Madison, this popular Midwestern city has experienced a boom in the tech, healthcare, and manufacturing industries in recent years, creating plenty of career options—and competition for housing. Overall, rents have increased by 9.5 percent between 2012 and 2018. The hot rental market all but erases the difference between on- and off-campus housing: At $865 for off-campus rental and $866 for campus housing, you can make your decision by flipping a coin.

You can almost see the split between students and professionals by a visit to two popular streets: Monroe Street, which has Trader Joe’s and boutique restaurants, and Regent Street, where you’ll find pubs and pizza joints. But in either location, you can enjoy a little more grown-up living than in many student-heavy neighborhoods. Both Madison’s Regent and Dudgeon-Monroe rate high for safety, tidy yards, walkability, and dog-friendliness.

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Gainesville, Florida

On-campus: $641 ~ Off-campus: $687

With a campus made up of more than 150 research centers and institutes, not to mention a popular sports program, the University of Florida is the backbone of Gainesville. Rents have increased by an incredible 18.4 percent between 2012 and 2018, and the types of rentals available off-campus tend to include more standalone homes instead of big apartment complexes. Sharing your part of a two-bedroom would cost $641 on average. When compared to the on-campus estimate of $687 (which doesn’t include food), it costs you $46 more per month.

There are other perks to off-campus living if you’re in the College Park neighborhood; locals say it’s easy to find parking, walkable to things to do, quiet, and 100 percent say they feel comfortable walking alone at night there.

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College Station, Texas

On-campus: $875 ~ Off-campus: $760

As you can guess by the name, College Station, the home of Texas A&M University, is positively packed with students. Nearly half of the population is in college (44.9 percent), which explains why the median age here is 24. The University also is the city’s largest employer, creating plenty of post-grad employment opportunities—which could contribute to rents going up 16.8 percent between 2012 and 2018.

Still, those market rates are a good deal for students. If you’re looking to stay off-campus, your part of a two-bedroom rental would cost $760 versus $875 on-campus (without food), saving you $115 per month.

One unique aspect of the off-campus housing search in College Station is that there are buildings that are designated for student living and structure their properties accordingly. For instance, Rise at Northgate, a luxury community that’s practically on-campus, charges by the bed instead of the unit. Also, keep in mind that College Station’s Texas climate isn’t exactly amenable to walking outside (only 1 percent commute by foot), so calculate in transportation costs.

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Tempe, Arizona

On-campus: $861 ~ Off-campus: $825

Tempe is home to Arizona State University, a surprisingly lush campus surrounded by an arboretum downtown. Like many of the cities on our list, rent has trended upward between 2012 and 2018, increasing by 18.2 percent. Your part of an off-campus two-bedroom would set you back $825 versus $861 on campus (without food), which saves you $36 per month.

Of course, newer apartments in the city’s more modern complexes near campus are priced far higher, but looking slightly to the east of campus will yield more affordable rents. A two-bedroom apartment at The Hyve is $1,448 (or $724 per roommate) and is about a half a mile east of campus. And the lower prices don’t mean compromising on lifestyle; the modern finishes and luxury amenities like a pool and gym prove there are great off-campus deals to be found in Tempe.

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

On-campus: $1,222 ~ Off-campus: $1,193

The University of Michigan is one of the top-ranked universities in the world, and its home of Ann Arbor was declared the “Best College Town in the U.S.” in 2018 by Forbes, so it’s no wonder demand for housing is so high in this relatively small Midwestern city. Rents increased 14.3 percent between 2012 and 2018, and they were pretty high to begin with. The biggest change has come to two-bedrooms (they’ve increased by 33 percent). Your part of a two-bedroom would be $1,193 versus $1,222 on campus (including food) for a difference of only $29.

The good news for on-campus living in Ann Arbor is that the university and city are super close together. That means you’re right in the middle of the same arts, food, and culture everyone living in the uber-expensive Kerrytown and South University neighborhoods enjoys—unless your dorm is on North Campus, which is, admittedly, a hike from downtown. If you’re looking for a deal, rental prices go down the closer you get to nearby Ypsilanti, where the median rent drops by more than a third, but note that you’re in for a long bus ride to campus.

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Provo, Utah

On-campus: $417 ~ Off-campus: $693

Thanks to Brigham Young University, this scenic mountain city hasn’t escaped the trend of higher rents in college towns. Provo‘s rents increased 22.4 percent between 2012 and 2018. Young families and college students could be making two-bedrooms particularly in demand, as these units have increased in price by 24 percent. As a result, your part of the rent on a two-bedroom would be $693 versus $417 for on-campus housing. Opting to stay on-campus would save you $276 per month.

But if you have your heart set on off-campus life, consider focusing your search on Joaquin, the neighborhood bordering the south side of Brigham Young University. Here, locals praise the walkability, holiday spirit, and dog-friendliness, and you can rent a two-bedroom home for $875 total. Overall, it’s an affordable, family-friendly area that feels a bit different than other college cities.

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Bloomington, Indiana

On-campus: $774 ~ Off-campus: $733

The home of the University of Indiana – Bloomington feels like a small town, despite its 80,000 residents. Life revolves around the academic calendar, and there’s a petite downtown tailored to appeal to college budgets with affordable cafes, fast-food restaurants, coffee shops, and pubs. Bloomington is the rare entry on our list where the rent has actually decreased between 2012 and 2018, at a rate of -4.7 percent. The savings between off- and on-campus housing can differ, but on average, you’ll pay $733 for your half of a two-bedroom off-campus compared to $774 on-campus (without food).

Looking in the 47403 zip, which covers the walkable neighborhood Prospect Hill, can yield the biggest off-campus rental bargains—but watch out for added expenses. “Estimated utilities for a 2-bedroom unit in this area could cost upwards of $250 per month though, completely wiping out any savings,” Chacon says. “On top of that, most apartments in this zip code though are not very close to the university.”

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Berkeley, California

On-campus: $1,861 ~ Off-campus: $2,263

The University of California – Berkeley is another of the highest-ranking universities on the globe, and it has plenty of other things going for it, too: The campus is gorgeous, the weather is always great, and it’s right next to downtown Berkeley (home to some of the best food in the entire country).

A low cost of living, however, isn’t one of the benefits of living in this college city. Rents are very, very high, increasing a whopping 43.5 percent on average between 2012 and 2018. Your part of a two-bedroom is a steep $2,263 versus the on-campus cost of $1,861 (without food). Though both figures are the highest on our list, on-campus is still $402 cheaper.

Want to save more? Get ready for a commute. “To get anywhere near the on-campus rate, two roommates would have to look south 10 miles to Oakland‘s 94621, or 5 miles north to El Cerrito‘s 94530, which would cost $1,696 and $1,875, respectively, before utilities and transit costs,” says Chacon.

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Fort Collins, Colorado

On-campus: $1,444 ~ Off-campus: $1,026

Fort Collins is home to University of Colorado, as well as picture-perfect natural features like waterfalls and mountains. Rents in the highly livable community have increased 24.6 percent between 2012 and 2018, though you still might be able to save a few bucks by living off-campus. Your portion of the rent for a two-bedroom costs, on average, $1,026 compared to the estimated on-campus cost of $1,444 per month (a figure that does include food, however).

The $418 you’ll save living off-campus will cover plenty of visits to Totally ’80s Pizza, home to the only ’80s museum in the world. Wondering where to look for your new, affordable place? Try Old Prospect, a neighborhood across South College Avenue from the University of Colorado. It’s just a short bike ride away from the Old Town historic district, where you can browse shops in restored 1800s buildings. Some even compare the quaint area to Disneyland’s Main Street U.S.A.

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Thinking of living off-campus?​

Here’s our cheat sheet for getting the most value for your dollar:

  • Consider the price of utilities and meals. On-campus housing often bundles these costs in, while off-campus usually means everyone fends for themselves in those areas. In regions with more extreme weather, expect to pay a lot more for utilities in drafty rentals.
  • Factor in travel expenses. An off-campus bargain might not save you that much in the long run if you have to commute a long distance and budget for gas and parking (and parking tickets). If public transit is available, note how long the route between your rental and campus is before committing.
  • Keep lease length in mind. While some off-campus units might offer academic year leases, others might charge a lease-breaking fee or another penalty if you live there less than the full 12 months. Also, if you do have a 12-month lease, divide the year’s total rent by 9 to reflect the actual price of living for an academic year.

Methodology

In picking our college towns, we looked at census-defined places with at least 45,000 people as of the 2016 5-year ACS in which at least 20 percent of the population identified as enrolled in college or graduate school. Estimates for on-campus housing costs were obtained directly from the websites of the largest college or university in each of these places and we excluded the cost of meals when possible. When not explicitly stated, the cost for a full academic year (9 months) of on-campus housing was calculated either based on monthly, or per semester rates given.

To compare on-campus housing costs with off-campus market rates, we took the median estimated 12-month rent cost of all 2-bedroom units in an area, divided it between 2roommates, and divided it out over 9 months to match the academic year. So, for example, if the median rent of a 2-bedroom unit were $600 per month, that would be $7,200 for a year. Spread out over 9-months instead of 12 though, that works out to $800 per month and divided by 2 people is $400 per month.

This was done for both the cities where these colleges and universities are situated as well asthe zip codes of the surrounding area.

What are your favorite money-saving tips for getting the most out of your on- or off-campus budget? Let us know in the comments!

The post We Graded College Housing Data, and Off-campus Gets an A for Affordability appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

What a $250,000 Home Looks Like in Every State

Whether you’re simply browsing or looking to relocate, we’ve scoped out a home for sale for $250,000 in each of the largest cities in every state for $250,000, which is just shy of the national median list price of $289,000. These homes range from from 900 square feet in New York City to 3,504 square feet in Wichita, KS, and show where you can get the most bang for your buck.

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    $250K-in-Every-State-Birmingham-AL

    Alabama

    Alabama: Birmingham
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

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    $250K-in-Every-State-Anchorage-AK

    Alaska

    Alaska: Anchorage
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

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    $250K-in-Every-State-Phoenix-AZ

    Arizona

    Arizona: Phoenix
    Three Bedroom Home
    $259,000

  •  

     



    Arkansas

    Arkansas: Little Rock
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    California

    California: Los Angeles
    Three Bedroom House
    $255,000

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    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Denver-CO

    Colorado

    Colorado: Denver
    Two Bedroom Condo
    $250,000

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    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Bridgeport-CT

    Connecticut

    Connecticut: Bridgeport
    Nine Bedroom Townhouse
    $255,000

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    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Wilmington-DE

    Delaware

    Delaware: Wilmington
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Jacksonville-FL

    Florida

    Florida: Jacksonville
    Four Bedroom Home
    $254,900

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    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Atlanta-GA

    Georgia

    Georgia: Atlanta
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

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    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Honolulu-HI

    Hawaii

    Hawaii: Honolulu
    One Bedroom Condo
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Idaho

    Idaho: Boise
    Three Bedroom Home
    $259,900

  •  

     



    Illinois

    Illinois: Chicago
    One Bedroom Apartment
    $250,000

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    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Indianapolis-IN

    Indiana

    Indiana: Indianapolis
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Iowa

    Iowa: Des Moines
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Kansas

    Kansas: Wichita
    Five Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Louisville-KY

    Kentucky

    Kentucky: Louisville
    Two Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Louisiana

    Louisiana: New Orleans
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Maine

    Maine: Portland
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Maryland

    Maryland: Baltimore
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Boston-MA

    Massachusetts

    Massachusettes: Boston
    Three Bedroom Condo
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Detroit-MI

    Michigan

    Michigan: Detroit
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Minnesota

    Minnesota: Minneapolis
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

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    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Jackson-MS

    Mississippi

    Mississippi: Jackson
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

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    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Kansas-City-MO

    Missouri

    Missouri: Kansas City
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Montana

    Montana: Billings
    Two Bedroom Townhouse
    $250,000

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    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Omaha-NE

    Nebraska

    Nebraska: Omaha
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

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    Nevada

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    New Hampshire

    New Hampshire: Manchester
    Two Bedroom House
    $250,000

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    New Jersey

    New Jersey: Newark
    Three Bedroom Townhouse
    $259,800

  •  

     



    New Mexico

    New Mexico: Albuquerque
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

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    $250K-Homes-Across-America-New York-NY

    New York

    New York: New York
    Three Bedroom Coop
    $250,000

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    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Charlotte-NC

    North Carolina

    North Carolina: Charlotte
    Four Bedroom Home
    $250,000

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    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Fargo-ND

    North Dakota

    North Dakota: Fargo
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Columbus-OH

    Ohio

    Ohio: Columbus
    Three Bedroom Home
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Oklahoma-City-OK

    Oklahoma

    Oklahoma: Oklahoma City
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Portland-OR

    Oregon

    Oregon: Portland
    Two Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    Pennslyvania

    Pennslyvania: Philadelphia
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Providence-RI

    Rhode Island

    Rhode Island: Providence
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

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    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Charleston-SC

    South Carolina

    South Carolina: Charleston
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Sioux-Falls-SD

    South Dakota

    South Dakota: Sioux Falls
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

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    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Nashville-TN

    Tennessee

    Tennessee: Nashville
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Houston-TX

    Texas

    Texas: Houston
    Two Bedroom Apartment
    $250,000

  •  

     



    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Salt-Lake-City-UT

    Utah

    Utah: Salt Lake City
    Three Bedroom House
    $255,000

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    Vermont

    Vermont: Burlington
    Three Bedroom Townhouse
    $270,000

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    Virginia

    Virginia: Virginia Beach
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

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    Washington

    Washington: Seattle
    Two Bedroom Home
    $250,000

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    $250K-Homes-Across-America-Washington-D.C.

    Washington, D.C.

    Washington, D.C.
    Studio Apartment
    $259,999

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    Wisconsin

    Wisconsin: Milwaukee
    Four Bedroom House
    $250,000

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    Wyoming

    Wyoming: Cheyenne
    Three Bedroom House
    $250,000

Any cities on the list that excite or surprise you? Comment below and let us know!

The post What a $250,000 Home Looks Like in Every State appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

What Locals Love About Their Austin Neighborhoods

If you’re thinking about moving to Austin, one of the most important things to figure out is what neighborhoods might be a good fit for you. Do you want to be close to the action or somewhere quieter? Are you a family with kids or a recent college grad just starting to build your adult life? Austin has neighborhoods to suit almost anyone – but if you really want to understand what an area has to offer, you have to talk to the people who live there. Which is why Trulia has added a new feature – What Locals Say – to every home listing. More than fifteen million locals have shared insights about their neighborhoods, and an average of 100,000 reviews are being added every day. We used that data to identify four very special, and very different, Austin neighborhoods that you might want to consider in your home search.

What Locals Love About Bouldin

Best for: A taste of all the things that make Austin Austin

If some locals consider this hip enclave to be the best neighborhood in all of Austin, it’s for a good reason. Bouldin, a historic zone just across the river from downtown’s core, contains a taste of all of the things that make the city great. And while it has a reputation for being a paradise for young singles, it’s much more than that – which you find when you dig into the numbers.

Fans of urban living value one neighborhood characteristic above all others: walkability. And Bouldin sure is walkable. Want to be able to mosey to cool bars and hot restaurants? Check, according to 94% of residents, with almost the same number adding that the neighborhood is a safe place to walk alone at night – and a large majority appreciating the fact that even there are sidewalks, which is not a given in this car-oriented town. Interested in a tattoo? Bouldin has you (literally, if that’s your style) covered. Are you an Asian-food fan? Great, because Bouldin features some of the best Vietnamese and Thai restaurants in the city. Enjoy silence? So do your potential neighbors, despite the lively shopping and dining scene on the main drags, with 82% describing Bouldin as quiet. Love dogs? A resounding 100% of locals who weighed in on the matter describe the hood as ‘dog friendly.’ And while 75% of residents say you are probably going to want to own a car, the same number note that you won’t need it for errands like grocery shopping. As one local puts it: “Living so near [downtown] and having the peace and quiet of a suburban neighborhood gives you the feeling that every day is a vacation. What a great place to live!


A main street in Bouldin



Locals love Bouldin’s walkability.

If you’re interested in more of what Bouldin has to offer, here are some key spots to check out during your visit:

  • Best mega-Austin-y restaurant: The popular and bohemian Bouldin Creek Cafe, which one local describes as ‘the best Vegan diner on earth”
  • Best Vietnamese restaurant: Elizabeth Street Cafe, which also serves delicious French-Vietnamese baked goods
  • Best castle: Bouldin Castle, a Franciscan monastery-turned-spectacular medieval-inspired home  
  • Best park: Town Lake Memorial Park, which hugs the Colorado river with spectacular views of downtown
  • Best concert hall: The Long Center for the Performing Arts
  • Best neon-sign gallery: Roadhouse Relics, where local artist Todd Sanders crafts vintage-style designs
  • Best landmark: The famous ‘Greetings from Austin’ mural
  • Second-best landmark: The statue of late blues-guitar master Stevie Ray Vaughan

A busy street in Bouldin

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What Locals Love About Hyde Park

Best for: Bookish, crunchy, and mellow families who want a small-town feel in the big city

If you are looking for a small-town feel, historic Hyde Park – which is overwhelmingly residential and full of turn-of-the-century homes – is the move. The neighborhood has a longstanding reputation for being brainy, with deep connections to the nearby University of Texas,  and a little bit hippy. But dig into the numbers and you’ll find one of the most interesting residential zones in the city.

Victorian mansions meet modest bungalows in this leafy, historically protected district. But even though it is mostly residential, locals love the Hyde Park’s convenience to all key amenities. More than 95% of residents say that grocery shopping and dining are within easy walking distance (although this is still car-oriented Austin and 93% say you need a car). That urban feeling has some trade-offs, though, with less than half of residents finding their neighbors friendly or lauding their “holiday spirit.” But everyone loves dogs, with 100% claiming dog-friendliness, and even if you need to have a car, a solid 85% say that parking is no problem. As one local fan proclaims, “Great homes with character, walkable, friendly neighbors. The best!”


A Hyde Park local establishment



Quack’s Bakery is a Hyde Park staple.

Considering living in Hyde Park and planning on swinging by the neighborhood? Here are some things to look for:

  • Best bakery: Get a cupcake at Quack’s 43rd Street Bakery
  • Best coffee spot: Flightpath Coffeehouse, where the beard-and-glasses crowd huddle around Macbooks working on their dissertations  
  • Best historic home-turned-museum: The Elisabet Ney Museum, former home and workplace of the acclaimed German-American sculptor
  • Best hippie cafe: Mother’s, a classic vegetarian spot
  • Best comedy club: ColdTowne Theater, where you can also take an improv class
  • Best diner: Every neighborhood should have a diner, and the Omlettery is Hyde Park’s
  • Best import: In N’ Out Burger

Tree lined street in Hyde Park

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What Locals Love About Old West Austin

Best for: Hip families with young kids who love urban amenities

Back in 1991, Richard Linklater put both Austin and a certain style of local resident on the map with his groundbreaking feature-film debut, Slacker. And if you want to feel like you are a part of that movie, you could do worse than moving to – and spending your days drifting though – lovely Old West Austin’s vintage record stores, thrift shops, blues bars, and hip locavore restaurants. The ‘old’ part of the neighborhood’s name tells a big part of the story – it is one of the oldest areas in Austin, and its historic housing stock is protected by landmark laws. In part because of its location just west of downtown, Old West Austin also has a reputation for being a place that younger people, often just out of college, gravitate to, but if you talk to the locals and look art the numbers you’ll find a different story.

While Old West Austin is a great fit for young singles, it really shines as family neighborhood. A large majority of residents say that it’s safe for kids to play outside, which isn’t true of many nearby areas. They also agree that neighbors are friendly, holiday spirit abounds, dogs are loved, and it is safe to walk through at night. While virtually everyone agrees that you’ll need a car, 98% say parking is easy, and once you are in the neighborhood and looking for evening or weekend activities, you won’t need it much: 96% say grocery shopping is an easy walk, and 88% say the same of dining out. Parks, playground and hiking and biking trails abound. As one enthused resident puts it: “Dogs, people, location is great! Really special place that I can’t imagine living elsewhere! Never moving!”





Residents get a taste of Old West Austin in this rustic establishment.

If you want to get a taste of Old West Austin, here are some spots to check out:

  • Best vintage soda fountain: Grab a burger and a shake at Nau’s Enfield Drug’s vintage lunch counter in the back of a pharmacy
  • Best beer and wine bar: Chill out on the patio at Mean Eyed Cat
  • Best beach: Rent a kayak, ride a bike, or just catch a tan at Ladybird Lake-Lamar Beach Metro Park
  • Best bookstore: Bookpeople is a locally owned classic
  • Best record store: Waterloo Records is the indie record store of your Slacker-inspired dreams
  • Best Locavore restaurant: Get a reservation at Wink, a neighborhood institution
  • Best coffee spot: Caffe Medici

Locals kayaking and paddle boarding in Old West Austin

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What Locals Love About Allandale

Best for: Families looking for suburban amenities with a dash of Austin weird

This affluent north-central Austin neighborhood has everything a professional family might need: good schools, a wide variety of single-family homes on good-sized lots, parks and easy access to shopping an amenities. But it’s still Austin – and that means that there aren’t just Walmarts (although there is one of those) – there are also plenty of vibe-y bars, shops, and locavore restaurants. The neighborhood is also well served by public transportation, and sporty commuters have the option of a bike path that takes you all the way downtown. And if you talk to the locals and look at the numbers, you’ll understand why this is such a special place to live.

Everything a growing family might care about are the areas in which Allandale excels. More than 80% say that kids are safe to play outside – a high number for Austin. More than 95% say that yards are well-tended, parking is a breeze, and dogs are loved. More than 90% love the sidewalks and walkable grocery shopping. And a large majority say they are in for the long haul – with 79% saying they plan to remain in the area for at least five years. As one resident puts it, “I love this area! It’s close to everything and still secluded from the hustle of the city. The neighbors are super friendly.”


Austin Spider Tree



Allandale keeps Austin weird with their Austin Spider Tree.

If you’re considering Allandale, here are some neighborhood highlights to consider:

  • Best donuts: Gourdough’s has a wide variety of sweet treats
  • Best tiny pies: Tiny Pies bakes sweet and savory personal-sized pies
  • Best Mexican-Korean fusion: Get Korean barbecue in a taco at Chi’lantro
  • Best outdoor hang: Yard Bar is a dog-friendly spot for local beers and bites
  • Best Park: Sheffield Northwest Park’s playgrounds, lake, and tennis courts are the heart of the neighborhood
  • Best refurbished gas station: Phil’s Ice House, where you can grab a solid burger

A main street in Allandale

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The post What Locals Love About Their Austin Neighborhoods appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

Affordable Rentals With Bathrooms That’ll Make You Go, “Ooo!”

Searching for a great place to rent under $1,500 can be a daunting task in many cities. Add a need for a stellar bathroom into the mix, and it can feel downright impossible. And yet, it’s not. There are affordable apartments with beautiful bathrooms. And once you start thinking about double sinks, sleek finishes, and storage to spare, you might decide it’s worth the hunt. Here are seven apartments with bathrooms that pack a lot of charm into a manageable rental rate.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

Like the look of this apartment’s bathroom? The kitchen matches. See more photos here.

Las Vegas, Nevada

Chill one-bedroom outside The Strip

$1,190/month

The Strip is all glitz and glamour, but just outside the heart of the city you can find a sense of calm in the Somerset at Providence neighborhood. This area of Las Vegas has very low crime and features a natural landscape with a number of different parks.

one-bedroom apartment at Liberty Square at Providence Apartments comes with the standard rental community amenities, like a pool, gym, and a nice clubhouse, but the bathroom goes beyond the ordinary. Wood-grain flooring, espresso cabinets topped with white granite countertops and two sinks—it’s almost like a spa. Or, at least, the bathroom at a spa. If you happen to have spent the day working in the chaotic Strip (or doing anything anywhere in the Las Vegas heat), it’s a perfect place to decompress.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

After a sunny, sweaty day out on the water, this apartment offers a lovely spot to get cleaned up. See more photos here.

Charleston, South Carolina

Modern apartment with Southern charm

$1,315/month

Charleston is becoming a desired city with its burgeoning food scene, gorgeous beaches, and Southern charm. The Sweetwater Rentals community on the north end of Charleston has all that, plus easy access to nearby Nowell Creek and Cooper River for boating and breathtaking landscapes.

Inside this one-bedroom rental, you’ll enjoy cheerful, white decor in a very spacious bathroom. The gray, granite countertop has plenty of room for toiletries, and the multiple lights bring a bright, daytime glow to the upbeat space.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

This place isn’t afraid of color, from the red mirror to accent walls throughout the apartment. See more photos here.

San Antonio, Texas

Sleek apartments in the heart of the city

$1,470/month

San Antonio is a lively city full of plenty of restaurants, nightlife, and activities for both young professionals and families. Arrive Elian Rentals is steps from it all with dozens of nearby restaurants and an IMAX movie theater. On the property, there are jogging trails, two outdoor pools, and an outdoor kitchen for entertaining friends.

And the bathroom is great? Inside this one-bedroom apartment’s powder room, you’ll find a blend of sleek, modern finishes and fun accents like a red-framed mirror that pops against gray-blue walls. The bathroom also has a separate tub and shower stall, giving you more options for getting clean than you’ll know what to do with.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

This spa-like look continues throughout the entire apartment community. See more photos here.

Birmingham, Alabama

Upscale one-bedroom in a low-key neighborhood

$1,391/month

Alabama’s largest city is a great place to live if you’re trying to stretch the dollar—Birmingham is one of the cities in the U.S. where your paycheck goes the furthest. This one-bedroom apartment in the Park 35 on Clairmont community is a case in point. It’s affordable, it’s right between a beautiful golf course and fun restaurants, and it’s in the young, majority-single, low-crime neighborhood of Forest Park. And then, there’s the bathroom.

The look of white walls against white subway tile against white cabinets against light floor tiles and silver finishes gives this bathroom a deeply serene vibe. And though the complex is pet-friendly, you don’t have to worry about clogging your lovely shower drain with Fido’s hair—there’s a self-service pet spa on site.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

As if this bathroom doesn’t look relaxing enough, the apartment has cozy deck, too. See more photos here.

Cincinnati, Ohio

Suburban style close to downtown
$1,490/month

Altitude Blue Ash apartment community in suburban Cincinnati checks many livability boxes for its walkability, proximity to downtown Blue Ash, and award-winning school districts. Just north of Cincinnati, Blue Ash offers plenty to do in its own right with great restaurants, like the Sleepy Bee Cafe and Bangkok Terrace.

Inside this affordable two-bedroom, you’ll find plenty of privacy, with a door separating the toilet from the sinks and closet space. The sink countertop is granite with plenty of storage below and is topped with a nice, long mirror to help you evaluate your look from any angle.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

This apartment is full of fun details, like oversized floor tiles and a retro backsplash in the kitchen. See more photos here.

Dallas, Texas

Retro charm a quirky community

$1,045/month

The picturesque Lakewood area of Dallas is home to many families and nature-lovers. It’s a generally pricey neighborhood, which makes the affordable Lakewood Plaza apartments an even better deal.  And if retro-chic is your idea of beautiful, the bathroom in this one-bedroom apartment definitely qualifies as lovely.

With shiny, mint tile wrapping around every wall and quirky, hexagonal floor tiles, this small-but-sweet bathroom turns on the charm. The look continues throughout the apartment, with a misty-green subway tile in the kitchen that’s equally adorable. And if you like the retro look of the place, you’ll love the look of the historic Lakewood Theater, a nearby landmark locals are currently trying to preserve.

 Looking for a beautiful bathroom to call your own? Find your next apartment on Trulia.

The post Affordable Rentals With Bathrooms That’ll Make You Go, “Ooo!” appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

What It’s Like to Live in These American Gayborhoods

The Castro. Greenwich Village. Chelsea. America’s most historic LGBTQ neighborhoods have plenty of name recognition, but lesser-known gayborhoods are in almost every city in the country. And living in them is not all Pride parades and rainbow-clad bars (although there are plenty of those, too). From Salt Lake City to suburban Atlanta, we take an inside look at everyday life in these five fascinating gayborhoods.

 

South End, Boston

Good music is easy to find in Boston’s South End. See available homes here.

South End, Boston

Boston’s South End was once a jazz stronghold—now it’s a gay one.

With its collection of immaculately preserved Victorian row houses (the largest in the nation), handsome public parks, and sought-after restaurants, the South End is considered one of Boston’s most desirable neighborhoods. It’s also the gayest: According to the 2010 census, it was the city’s most popular neighborhood for same-sex male couples.

In the mid-19th century, the area was a haven for wealthy urbanites. When they fled for the suburbs in the early 20th century, the neighborhood became a home for African Americans, who brought jazz to the South End. Between 1915 and 1917, the top black musicians’ union in the country had its offices in the South End. Wally’s Cafe, one of the last remaining jazz clubs in the area, keeps the neighborhood’s musical legacy alive today.

Outside of jazz, there are many other beloved nightlife spots to be found—including the Boston Eagle, a long-running gay bar. These buzzy spots keep South End’s commercial district running late into the night, mostly with young professionals. But many of the leafy side streets are whisper-quiet. “While a lot of people like to say the South End is gentrifying, it’s not all for the worst,” says Jeffrey Borst, a retiree who has lived in the neighborhood for 12 years. “More families are moving in, and the food scene is better than ever. You don’t need to go to other neighborhoods for good food anymore.”

The centrally-located and increasingly swanky South End is among Boston’s pricier areas. The median home sales price is $905,000. (Elsewhere in Boston it’s $620,000.) Median rent lands at $5,350. The good news is the South End has plenty available to buy or rent.


 

 

Avondale Estates, Georgia

Avondale Estates Georgia is as quaint a town as they come. See available homes here.

Avondale Estates, Georgia

 Avondale Estates is home to the Georgia General Assembly’s first openly gay representative—and she’s still serving after 17 years.

This tight-knit community is only eight miles east of Atlanta, though it can feel more like England. Named after Shakespeare’s birthplace, Avondale Estates is full of tree-lined streets, small-town charm and an impressive collection of Tudor Revival architecture. Even the downtown looks straight out of the English countryside (complete with the Towne Cinema).

Avondale Estates not only has the state’s highest population of same-sex couples, it’s also had a gay representative, Karla Drenner, since 2001. She was the first openly gay person elected to the Georgia General Assembly and is now one of only four LGBTQ representatives.

The well-behaved suburb offers a flourishing food and arts scene—every fall is the annual AutumnFest, which brings together local artisans and food (including an apple pie contest). Because of the many families that call the Estates home—it’s home to a popular magnet school—expect to see lots of strollers on the streets, and plenty of family-friendly dining and entertainment options. “We really hit the jackpot,” one resident says in a Trulia school review.

Avondale Estates—while still affordable, compared to other parts of metro Atlanta—is seeing substantial growth in home value. The median sales price for homes is $322,500, up from $292,900 the year before. The median rent is $1,947, but the market for rentals can be scarce.


 

 

Marmalade District, Salt Lake City

Want to live in Salt Lake City’s Marmalade District? Knowing how to preserve fruit will come in handy. See available homes here.

Marmalade District, Salt Lake City

The Marmalade District was named after fruit preserves, so of course its first gay bar was called “Club Jam.”

Salt Lake City—or Utah for that matter—probably isn’t the first place people think of when they think of LGBTQ enclaves. But the city’s historic Marmalade District, located just north of downtown and west of the Capitol Building, has been drawing LGBTQ individuals for at least a decade—and they’ve helped shaped Salt Lake City into a welcoming place for all kinds of people.

The neighborhood was the original home of the Utah Pride Center, but many locals credit the 2007 opening of Club Jam, the neighborhood’s first gay bar, for sowing the seeds of inclusivity.

Speaking of seeds, the neighborhood was named after the fruit trees planted by early settlers, and every year the neighborhood council hosts the Marmalade Jam Fest, which features a fruit preservation competition.

The Marmalade District is quiet, residential, and picturesque. “Many parks, historic sites, cultural opportunities nearby,” one resident says on Trulia’s What Locals Say. “Ensign Peak is a couple of miles to the north, and is one of my favorite spots with stunning views of the entire south and western valley.”

The Marmalade District is considered part of the Capitol Hill neighborhood. It’s among the city’s priciest areas—the average listing price is $720,566. (The average listing price in all of Salt Lake City is $432,629.) In Marmalade, in particular, many of the homes are historic and highly coveted. The eclectic mix of homes feature examples of Carpenter, Gothic, and Italianate architecture.


 

 

Andersonville, Chicago

Andersonville is a gayborhood with more than its fair share of pickled herring and knäckebröd. See available homes here.

Andersonville, Chicago

Andersonville has a Scandinavian past and an LGBTQ present. 

The Boystown neighborhood may get all the credit—what with being the nation’s first officially recognized gay village and all—but nearby Andersonville, about seven miles north of downtown Chicago, is a gayborhood unlike any other. Swedish farmers first settled the area in the mid-19th century, and the neighborhood still has a strong Scandinavian identity, anchored by the Swedish American Museum and an assortment of Swedish bakeries and restaurants.

The community of about 110,000 has long been considered a lesbian enclave—it’s sometimes referred to as “Girlstown.” Many locals point to the opening of the feminist and LGBTQ-oriented Women and Children First bookstore in the early ’90s for the initial influx of lesbians to the neighborhood, and it’s still a neighborhood institution.

Thanks to Andersonville’s well-regarded public schools, more families are starting to call the neighborhood home. But young, single adults can still find a bustling downtown area with beloved, locally-owned shops and bars. “We don’t like to leave on the weekends,” Karen Krider says, who’s lived in the neighborhood with her family for six years. “It’s a small town not far from the big city, and a quiet, lovely place to return to each night.”

You can also find great value for your dollar in Andersonville. The median home price is $275,000. The median rent is around $3,850, and there are lots of properties to be found.


 

 

Washington Square West

When the neighborhood is named after a park, you know it’s going to be pretty. See available homes here.

Washington Square West, Philadelphia

Washington Square West’s rainbow-hued street signs make it one of four LGBT districts in North America to be visibly marked.

Though it was first coined “The Gayborhood” by a local newspaper writer in 1992, Philadelphia’s Washington Square West had long been the city’s epicenter of LGBTQ activity. Throughout the ’70s and ’80s, it was the center of Philadelphia’s gay bathhouse culture. In 2007, the city officially recognized the area as a gay village and added gay pride rainbow flag symbols to street signs throughout the neighborhood.

Washington Square West is within walking distance of all the city’s major commercial districts—but there are lots of local shops and restaurants, too, including many with outdoor seating, like Talula’s Garden.

“This neighborhood is central to everything,” one resident says on Trulia’s What Locals Say reviews. “I can’t think of a neighborhood with a better location.” The area buzzes with pedestrian traffic during the day, and its many bars keep it hopping late into the night. But the stately Washington Square offers a peaceful escape from the city’s hustle and bustle. On warm days, kids can be seen playing in the square’s fountain.

In Washington Square West, the average home price is $414,250, and the median rent falls around $2,600.

Looking for a more inclusive neighborhood? Find what’s available in these communities and more on Trulia.

The post What It’s Like to Live in These American Gayborhoods appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

What an Average Home Looks Like in Every State

Across the United States, an average home can look very different state by state. Although the median list price nationwide is $289,000, in Hawaii, it’s $639,000, and in West Virginia, that number drops down to $164,000. Check out our roundup of what an average home looks like in each state to see how your state compares to the rest.

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    Alabama

    Median List Price: $214,900

    Four Bedroom Home: $214,900

    In Smiths Town, on the border with Georgia, a four-bedroom single-family rambler sits on a grassy lot. There’s a spacious living room, a kitchen with granite counters, stainless steel appliances and space for a breakfast table. The cost per square foot is $97.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Alaska

    Alaska

    Median List Price: $294,000

    Four Bedroom Home: $289,900

    This 1,652 square-foot ranch house in Anchorage sports a new roof and a renovated kitchen and bathrooms. The detached garage offers lots of storage space.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Arizona

    Arizona

    Median List Price: $299,000

    Three Bedroom Home: $299,000

    This coral-colored 1,638 square-foot house in North Phoenix has a big backyard for entertainment and play. The interior boasts three bedrooms, two bathrooms and an open-concept living area with a spacious Great Room.

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    Median-List-Price-Arkansas

    Arkansas

    Median List Price: $179,900

    Three Bedroom Home: $179,900

    This 2,187 square-foot house sits on 3.5 acres in Harrisburg, in the northeastern part of the state. A screened patio is great for outdoor meals. Sit on a rocker or swing on the front porch to watch the world go by.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-California

    California

    Median List Price: $549,000

    Five Bedroom Home: $549,000

    For this budget in the Rancho Vista Estates, located in Temecula, you can buy a five-bedroom house with three-car garage and pool. The kitchen is outfitted with white cabinets, granite counters and a center island. There are separate living and dining rooms.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Colorado

    Colorado

    Median List Price: $425,000

    Three Bedroom Home: $410,000

    This 1,680 square-foot house northwest of Denver is close to good roads and public transit. Built in 1907, it has been upgraded with new floors and new appliances.The master bedroom and two smaller bedrooms are on the main level and an upstairs loft can be designed as a fourth bedroom.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Connecticut

    Connecticut

    Median List Price: $340,000

    Three Bedroom Home: $339,000

    In Waterford, close to Long Island Sound, this budget buys you a 1,600 square-foot single-family home. Adjacent to the house is a saltwater pool, pool house, heated garage and fenced patio. The open-concept interior features a living and dining room plus kitchen and is perfect for hanging out. A large basement can be configured as an exercise room, lounge, office or playroom.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Delaware

    Delaware

    Median List Price: $295,000

    Three Bedroom Home: $294,900

    For this budget in Wilmington, you can buy a three-bedroom ranch house on a quarter-acre lot. This 1,150 square-foot house features hardwood floors throughout and a flagstone patio. The finished lower level offers three rooms that can be designed to suit your taste and needs.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Florida

    Florida

    Median List Price: $299,900

    Three Bedroom Home: $299,900

    Palm Harbor, northwest of Tampa on Saint Joseph Sound, is where you can find this 2,000 square-foot split-level home. The three-bedroom house has been refurbished with fresh paint, new windows and carpeting. The house is part of the community of Westlake Village, which offers residents a pool, clubhouse, ball courts and playground.

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    Median List Price in Every State: Georgia

    Georgia

    Median List Price: $265,000

    Four Bedroom Home: $265,000

    North of Atlanta in Marietta, you can buy this 2,280 square-foot, three-level contemporary house. Built in 1977, the home sits on a wooded, 10,000 square-foot lot. A deck overlooks the backyard and is perfect for hosting a party.

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    Hawaii

    Median List Price: $639,000

    Three Bedroom Home: $635,000

    In Wahiawa, on the island of Oahu northwest of Honolulu, you can buy a 1,128 square-foot single-family on a corner lot. Lychee trees, flowers and palm trees of all sizes surround the house. You can park your car, bike, stroller or motorcycle in the carport.

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    Idaho

    Median List Price: $314,303

    Four Bedroom Home: $315,000

    In Boise, this budget allows you to buy a 2,000 square-foot, single-family house where you can relax on the front porch and have meals on the rear deck. The updated kitchen features an island, granite counters, hardwood floors and stainless steel appliances.

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    Illinois

    Median List Price: $245,000

    Three Bedroom Home: $245,000

    West of Chicago in Dekalb, this brick rambler on nearly two acres is on the market for just shy of a quarter million. A gazebo and screened porch lets you enjoy the country-like setting. The living room has a fireplace and the kitchen has white glazed cabinetry.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Indiana

    Indiana

    Median List Price: $196,607

    Two Bedroom Home: $196,900

    East of South Bend and just below the Michigan border, you can find this 1986 ranch house with nearly 3,000 square feet. The living room bay window lets in plenty of natural light and there’s a gas fireplace. The two-bedroom boasts an updated eat-in kitchen and a basement that can be reconfigured into another bedroom, office or playroom.

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    Iowa

    Median List Price: $199,000

    Five Bedroom Home: $199,600

    In Lamoni, south of Des Moines, you can snap up a five-bedroom rambler under $200,000. This home features a kitchen with cherry custom cabinets and a breakfast eating area. A custom-built china cabinet is part of the dining room. There’s an enclosed, three-season room with southern exposure and a partially finished basement.

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    Kansas

    Median List Price: $199,000

    Five Bedroom Home: $199,000

    In Wichita, a 16-year-old redbrick home is selling for $93 per square foot. The large footprint offers five bedrooms, three bathrooms, vaulted ceilings and a spacious basement. There’s a triple-car garage and grassy front yard.

     

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Kentucky

    Kentucky

    Median List Price: $189,900

    Four Bedroom Home: $189,900

    This Winchester home, on a fenced-in corner lot, is just 12 minutes from Lexington. Four bedrooms and three bathrooms are spread over 2,300 square feet. An open kitchen is adjacent to a large living room that features a fireplace. The back porch is furnished with a hot tub.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Louisiana

    Louisiana

    Median List Price: $220,000

    Three Bedroom Home: $215,000

    In Lafayette, you can buy this custom-built, single-family house. A rear patio looks out on trees and a yard big enough to install a pool. The master bathroom boasts a whirlpool tub.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Maine

    Maine

    Median List Price: $239,900

    Three Bedroom Home: $239,900

    This white-painted brick home in Falmouth is about 900 square feet. Built in 1900, the single-family house features two bedrooms and one bathroom.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Maryland

    Maryland

    Median List Price: $345,000

    Three Bedroom Home: $345,000

    This three-bedroom, two-bathroom brick rambler is 3,100 square feet. It’s located in Westminster, which is northwest of Baltimore. The nearly two-acre lot is fenced and overlooks a horse farm. There’s a large deck in the backyard.

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    Massachusetts

    Median List Price: $470,000

    Three Bedroom Home: $475,000

    In Middleboro, south of Boston, a buyer can get this 2,600-square-foot single-family. The three-bedroom house sits on 5.6 acres of woods and is adjacent to a 450-acre conservation property. Inside, there’s a wood fireplace with stone surround to get cozy.

     

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    Michigan

    Median List Price: $200,703

    Three Bedroom Home: $190,000

    For less than $200,00 you can get this two-level Ann Arbor house. The 1,200 square-foot single-family has an open-layout interior and features a two-car garage and a large basement with laundry facilities.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Minnesota

    Minnesota

    Median List Price: $275,455

    Four Bedroom Home: $275,000

    In Big Lake, northwest of Minneapolis, this budget will get you a 2,100 square-foot single-family with four bedrooms and two bathrooms. The house, built in 1984, lies on five acres and includes a fenced garden and lawn. An outdoor deck is an attractive feature.

     

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    Mississippi

    Median List Price: $188,900

    Two Bedroom Home: $189,000

    This three-year-old, 1,300 square-foot stone cottage is located on a wooded acre in Oxford, southeast of Memphis. It is close to Holly Springs National Forest. There are two bedrooms, two bathrooms and a screened porch.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Missouri

    Missouri

    Median List Price: $189,900

    Two Bedroom Home: $189,900

    This redbrick 1,400 square-foot house in St. Louis features a large eat-in kitchen, a dining room decorated with wainscoting, and a master bedroom. An upstairs loft can be configured to suit a buyer’s needs.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Montana

    Montana

    Median List Price: $324,556

    One Bedroom Home: $325,000

    This 1,000 square-foot boathouse in Bigfork has one bedroom and bathroom. It features a drive-in boat garage beneath the house for three boats, and a garage door and concrete dock. This waterfront property is for sale by owner.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Nebraska

    Nebraska

    Median List Price: $227,000

    Three Bedroom Home: $229,900

    Southwest of Omaha, in Gretna, you can buy a three-bedroom, brick-and-siding rambler. The house is 2,650 square feet and sits on a third of an acre. You can add additional rooms across the lower level plus build a third garage. The price is $85 per square foot.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Nevada

    Nevada

    Median List Price: $319,900

    Three Bedroom Home: $319,900

    In Las Vegas, this budget will enable you to buy a 2,000 square-foot, terra cotta-roofed house with a two-car garage. The kitchen offers dark cabinetry, granite counters, an island and stainless steel appliances. The kitchen space blends with the family room and dining area. The house was built in 2010.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-New-Hampshire

    New Hampshire

    Median List Price: $300,000

    Three Bedroom Home: $300,000

    In Dover, just west of the Atlantic Ocean coastline, this 1,700 square-foot house has been renovated and updated. Built in 1900, it sits on an 8,300 square-foot lot under the shade of a tall old tree.

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    Median-List-Price in-Every-State-New-Jersey

    New Jersey

    Median List Price: $359,000

    Three Bedroom Home: $359,000

    In Toms River you can buy a 2,000 square-foot single-family home with nine-foot ceilings, three bedrooms and many upgrades. The house boasts two fireplaces, Anderson windows, granite kitchen counters and a spacious deck. There’s also an 11,000-pound boat lift.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-New-Mexico

    New Mexico

    Median List Price: $239,900

    Three Bedroom Home: $239,000

    For this budget, you can purchase a three-bedroom, 1,400 square-foot house in Ruidoso, which lies roughly between Albuquerque and El Paso. The house has two levels with wrap-around decks on both levels. The interior features wood floors and an open floor plan.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-New-York

    New York

    Median List Price: $399,000

    Four Bedroom Home: $399,000

    This two-story house is for sale in Freeport, Long Island, an hour’s drive from New York City. The four-bedroom single-family home was built in 1898 in a Victorian style but the interior was gutted and re-imagined for contemporary living. It has an open floor plan, and a finished attic and basement.

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    North Carolina

    Median List Price: $271,103

    Three Bedroom Home: $272,000

    In Wilmington, this 1,815 square-foot home with three bedrooms and two bathrooms is move-in ready. It features new floors and carpet, new light fixtures, stainless steel appliances and granite counters. The house was built in 1997.

     

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    North Dakota

    Median List Price: $238,000

    Four Bedroom Home: $235,000

    In Grand Forks, midway between Fargo and the Canadian border, you can find a four-bedroom, single-family house for less than a quarter million. This home has a fenced backyard and a two-car garage.

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    Ohio

    Median List Price: $179,900

    Four Bedroom Home: $179,900

    West of Cleveland in North Olmsted, this budget can get you a 1,750-square-foot ranch house on half an acre. Hardwood floors run throughout this home and the kitchen was updated this year. The house is handicap accessible with a walk-in shower, second kitchen, and a ramp that can be removed.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Oklahoma

    Oklahoma

    Median List Price: $189,500

    Three Bedroom Home: $189,500

    In Owasso, northeast of Tulsa, you can get a red brick rambler with three bedrooms and two updated bathrooms. The 1,790 square-foot house sits on a 1.1-acre corner lot and and has a spacious front yard. It costs $106 per square foot.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Oregon

    Oregon

    Median List Price: $394,000

    Three Bedroom Home: $395,000

    This updated 1945 Portland house offers three bedrooms and bathrooms across 3,000 square feet. The basement can be refurbished for more space. A one-car garage is in the rear.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Pennslyvania

    Pennslyvania

    Median List Price: $224,900

    Four Bedroom Home: $225,000

    This 1,700 square-foot home in Horsham, north of Philadelphia, is a foreclosure property. The price per square foot for this four-bedroom home is $125.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Rhode-Island

    Rhode Island

    Median List Price: $329,000

    Three Bedroom Home: $329,000

    For this budget you can buy a renovated 1,700 square-foot Cape Cod house in Warwick. This three-bedroom house has pink siding with white window trim, black shutters and a black roof. The interior is designed around an open floor plan. The home features cathedral ceiling, two fireplaces and a roof deck.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-South-Carolina

    South Carolina

    Median List Price: $259,000

    Four Bedroom Home: $259,000

    In Beaufort, northeast of Savannah, this budget will allow you to buy a 1,400-square-foot house. This two-level property has three bedrooms and a two-car garage. The living and dining rooms have bamboo floors.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-South-Dakota

    South Dakota

    Median List Price: $231,000

    Four Bedroom Home: $234,900

    For this price in Sioux Falls you can buy an 1,800 square-foot split-level. The main level has an open floor plan, with a sliding glass door leading to a covered deck. There are four bedrooms and two bathrooms.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Tennessee

    Tennessee

    Median List Price: $253,183

    Four Bedroom Home: $253,000

    In Maryville, south of Knoxville, you can purchase this 2,400-square-foot brick rambler that was designed by an architect in 1978. A traditional layout offers separate living and dining rooms, a den with fireplace, a spacious kitchen and a basement rec room.

     

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Texas

    Texas

    Median List Price: $288,255

    Three Bedroom Home: $288,000

    Carrollton is north of Dallas. There, this budget will get you a 1,700-square-foot townhouse. This two-story, three-bedroom home was built in 2004. It has an adjacent two-car garage. Residents are automatically community members and have access to a pool.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Utah

    Utah

    Median List Price: $363,583

    Three Bedroom Home: $364,000

    In Hurricane, northeast of Las Vegas, this budget lets you buy a 2,140-square-foot ranch house. The lot of this single-family is slightly larger than half-acre. You can choose where to while away your weekends: The backyard is shaded and the house front has a porch.

     

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Vermont

    Vermont

    Median List Price: $271,871

    Three Bedroom Townhouse: $270,000

    In Burlington, this two-level townhome has three bedrooms across 1,500 square feet. There’s a rear fenced patio, a deck and two-car garage. Residents are members of the community association and pay a monthly fee of $279 for communal services like trash pickup and snow removal.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Virginia

    Virginia

    Median List Price: $325,000

    Four Bedroom Home: $319,900

    This 2,000 square-foot house in Chesapeake, south of Norfolk and west of Virginia Beach, was built in 1986. The single-family is priced at $159 per square foot. There are four bedrooms, two bathrooms and a front porch. Mature trees shade the lot.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Washington

    Washington

    Median List Price: $400,000

    Four Bedroom Home: $400,000

    This 1917 Craftsman-style house in Tacoma has hardwood floors, new bathrooms, new light fixtures and fresh paint. The single-family is well-situated for accessing community amenities and features a three-car garage.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Washington-D.C.

    Washington, D.C.

    Median List Price: $619,900

    Three Bedroom Home:$599,000

    In the Woodbridge neighborhood of Northeast D.C. this budget will enable you to buy a 1,200 square-foot house. This two-story house has three bedrooms, three bathrooms and a front porch. The 1940 single-family has been remodeled with hardwood floors, kitchen island, granite counters and white cabinets.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-West-Virginia

    West Virginia

    Median List Price: $164,000

    Four Bedroom Home: $164,000

    In Westover, not far from the Monongahela River, you can buy a four-bedroom house with 1,400 square feet. The kitchen and bathroom of this single-family have been updated. There are hardwood floors and a large basement.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Wisconsin

    Wisconsin

    Median List Price: $226,303

    Four Bedroom Home: $226,900

    In Medford, northeast of Eau Claire, a 4,000 square-foot house boasts separate living and dining rooms. The walk-out basement is designed as a family room with a wet bar, and an adjacent room can be used as an office or a bedroom. The house is on a cul-de-sac lot about one acre in size.

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    Median-List-Price-in-Every-State-Wyoming

    Wyoming

    Median List Price: $255,000

    Three Bedroom Home: $255,000

    Star Valley Ranch is just south of Grand Teton National Park. There, you can get an 1,100 square-foot cabin on nearly an acre lot for about a quarter million. Views of the mountains are visible around this three-bedroom, single-family house, and especially from the deck. The home features a fireplace, a vaulted ceiling, an open loft and hardwood floors.

Which state surprised you the most? Comment below and let us know!

The post What an Average Home Looks Like in Every State appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

What Locals Love About Their Austin Neighborhoods

If you’re thinking about moving to Austin, one of the most important things to figure out is what neighborhoods might be a good fit for you. Do you want to be close to the action or somewhere quieter? Are you a family with kids or a recent college grad just starting to build your adult life? Austin has neighborhoods to suit almost anyone – but if you really want to understand what an area has to offer, you have to talk to the people who live there. Which is why Trulia has added a new feature – What Locals Say – to every home listing. More than fifteen million locals have shared insights about their neighborhoods, and an average of 100,000 reviews are being added every day. We used that data to identify four very special, and very different, Austin neighborhoods that you might want to consider in your home search.

What Locals Love About Bouldin

Best for: A taste of all the things that make Austin Austin

If some locals consider this hip enclave to be the best neighborhood in all of Austin, it’s for a good reason. Bouldin, a historic zone just across the river from downtown’s core, contains a taste of all of the things that make the city great. And while it has a reputation for being a paradise for young singles, it’s much more than that – which you find when you dig into the numbers.

Fans of urban living value one neighborhood characteristic above all others: walkability. And Bouldin sure is walkable. Want to be able to mosey to cool bars and hot restaurants? Check, according to 94% of residents, with almost the same number adding that the neighborhood is a safe place to walk alone at night – and a large majority appreciating the fact that even there are sidewalks, which is not a given in this car-oriented town. Interested in a tattoo? Bouldin has you (literally, if that’s your style) covered. Are you an Asian-food fan? Great, because Bouldin features some of the best Vietnamese and Thai restaurants in the city. Enjoy silence? So do your potential neighbors, despite the lively shopping and dining scene on the main drags, with 82% describing Bouldin as quiet. Love dogs? A resounding 100% of locals who weighed in on the matter describe the hood as ‘dog friendly.’ And while 75% of residents say you are probably going to want to own a car, the same number note that you won’t need it for errands like grocery shopping. As one local puts it: “Living so near [downtown] and having the peace and quiet of a suburban neighborhood gives you the feeling that every day is a vacation. What a great place to live!


A main street in Bouldin



Locals love Bouldin’s walkability.

If you’re interested in more of what Bouldin has to offer, here are some key spots to check out during your visit:

  • Best mega-Austin-y restaurant: The popular and bohemian Bouldin Creek Cafe, which one local describes as ‘the best Vegan diner on earth”
  • Best Vietnamese restaurant: Elizabeth Street Cafe, which also serves delicious French-Vietnamese baked goods
  • Best castle: Bouldin Castle, a Franciscan monastery-turned-spectacular medieval-inspired home  
  • Best park: Town Lake Memorial Park, which hugs the Colorado river with spectacular views of downtown
  • Best concert hall: The Long Center for the Performing Arts
  • Best neon-sign gallery: Roadhouse Relics, where local artist Todd Sanders crafts vintage-style designs
  • Best landmark: The famous ‘Greetings from Austin’ mural
  • Second-best landmark: The statue of late blues-guitar master Stevie Ray Vaughan

A busy street in Bouldin

Check out homes in Bouldin

View homes

What Locals Love About Hyde Park

Best for: Bookish, crunchy, and mellow families who want a small-town feel in the big city

If you are looking for a small-town feel, historic Hyde Park – which is overwhelmingly residential and full of turn-of-the-century homes – is the move. The neighborhood has a longstanding reputation for being brainy, with deep connections to the nearby University of Texas,  and a little bit hippy. But dig into the numbers and you’ll find one of the most interesting residential zones in the city.

Victorian mansions meet modest bungalows in this leafy, historically protected district. But even though it is mostly residential, locals love the Hyde Park’s convenience to all key amenities. More than 95% of residents say that grocery shopping and dining are within easy walking distance (although this is still car-oriented Austin and 93% say you need a car). That urban feeling has some trade-offs, though, with less than half of residents finding their neighbors friendly or lauding their “holiday spirit.” But everyone loves dogs, with 100% claiming dog-friendliness, and even if you need to have a car, a solid 85% say that parking is no problem. As one local fan proclaims, “Great homes with character, walkable, friendly neighbors. The best!”


A Hyde Park local establishment



Quack’s Bakery is a Hyde Park staple.

Considering living in Hyde Park and planning on swinging by the neighborhood? Here are some things to look for:

  • Best bakery: Get a cupcake at Quack’s 43rd Street Bakery
  • Best coffee spot: Flightpath Coffeehouse, where the beard-and-glasses crowd huddle around Macbooks working on their dissertations  
  • Best historic home-turned-museum: The Elisabet Ney Museum, former home and workplace of the acclaimed German-American sculptor
  • Best hippie cafe: Mother’s, a classic vegetarian spot
  • Best comedy club: ColdTowne Theater, where you can also take an improv class
  • Best diner: Every neighborhood should have a diner, and the Omlettery is Hyde Park’s
  • Best import: In N’ Out Burger

Tree lined street in Hyde Park

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What Locals Love About Old West Austin

Best for: Hip families with young kids who love urban amenities

Back in 1991, Richard Linklater put both Austin and a certain style of local resident on the map with his groundbreaking feature-film debut, Slacker. And if you want to feel like you are a part of that movie, you could do worse than moving to – and spending your days drifting though – lovely Old West Austin’s vintage record stores, thrift shops, blues bars, and hip locavore restaurants. The ‘old’ part of the neighborhood’s name tells a big part of the story – it is one of the oldest areas in Austin, and its historic housing stock is protected by landmark laws. In part because of its location just west of downtown, Old West Austin also has a reputation for being a place that younger people, often just out of college, gravitate to, but if you talk to the locals and look art the numbers you’ll find a different story.

While Old West Austin is a great fit for young singles, it really shines as family neighborhood. A large majority of residents say that it’s safe for kids to play outside, which isn’t true of many nearby areas. They also agree that neighbors are friendly, holiday spirit abounds, dogs are loved, and it is safe to walk through at night. While virtually everyone agrees that you’ll need a car, 98% say parking is easy, and once you are in the neighborhood and looking for evening or weekend activities, you won’t need it much: 96% say grocery shopping is an easy walk, and 88% say the same of dining out. Parks, playground and hiking and biking trails abound. As one enthused resident puts it: “Dogs, people, location is great! Really special place that I can’t imagine living elsewhere! Never moving!”





Residents get a taste of Old West Austin in this rustic establishment.

If you want to get a taste of Old West Austin, here are some spots to check out:

  • Best vintage soda fountain: Grab a burger and a shake at Nau’s Enfield Drug’s vintage lunch counter in the back of a pharmacy
  • Best beer and wine bar: Chill out on the patio at Mean Eyed Cat
  • Best beach: Rent a kayak, ride a bike, or just catch a tan at Ladybird Lake-Lamar Beach Metro Park
  • Best bookstore: Bookpeople is a locally owned classic
  • Best record store: Waterloo Records is the indie record store of your Slacker-inspired dreams
  • Best Locavore restaurant: Get a reservation at Wink, a neighborhood institution
  • Best coffee spot: Caffe Medici

Locals kayaking and paddle boarding in Old West Austin

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What Locals Love About Allandale

Best for: Families looking for suburban amenities with a dash of Austin weird

This affluent north-central Austin neighborhood has everything a professional family might need: good schools, a wide variety of single-family homes on good-sized lots, parks and easy access to shopping an amenities. But it’s still Austin – and that means that there aren’t just Walmarts (although there is one of those) – there are also plenty of vibe-y bars, shops, and locavore restaurants. The neighborhood is also well served by public transportation, and sporty commuters have the option of a bike path that takes you all the way downtown. And if you talk to the locals and look at the numbers, you’ll understand why this is such a special place to live.

Everything a growing family might care about are the areas in which Allandale excels. More than 80% say that kids are safe to play outside – a high number for Austin. More than 95% say that yards are well-tended, parking is a breeze, and dogs are loved. More than 90% love the sidewalks and walkable grocery shopping. And a large majority say they are in for the long haul – with 79% saying they plan to remain in the area for at least five years. As one resident puts it, “I love this area! It’s close to everything and still secluded from the hustle of the city. The neighbors are super friendly.”


Austin Spider Tree



Allandale keeps Austin weird with their Austin Spider Tree.

If you’re considering Allandale, here are some neighborhood highlights to consider:

  • Best donuts: Gourdough’s has a wide variety of sweet treats
  • Best tiny pies: Tiny Pies bakes sweet and savory personal-sized pies
  • Best Mexican-Korean fusion: Get Korean barbecue in a taco at Chi’lantro
  • Best outdoor hang: Yard Bar is a dog-friendly spot for local beers and bites
  • Best Park: Sheffield Northwest Park’s playgrounds, lake, and tennis courts are the heart of the neighborhood
  • Best refurbished gas station: Phil’s Ice House, where you can grab a solid burger

A main street in Allandale

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