What Locals Love About Their Neighborhoods

When you’re house hunting, style and square footage matter, but don’t get so caught up in those details that you forget about one of the most important considerations: neighborhood personality. Whether you’re looking for a cul-de-sac full of your kids’ future friends or a short walk to your favorite bar, picking the right neighborhood is essential to your homeowner happiness.

Who knows neighborhoods best? The locals. Here’s what residents around the nation love about their own stomping grounds.

  • Atlanta, Georgia

    what locals love about Atlanta

    From Midtown’s friendliness to East Atlanta’s community events, Georgia’s capital is neighborly as can be.

    Saying “Hi” to Neighbors: Midtown

    If you think Atlanta is a friendly place, you should check out Midtown. The residents of this neighborhood are committed to the art of congeniality—an impressive 79.7 percent of them say “hi” to their neighbors when they see them. In addition to strong community connections, this area is a hub for arts and culture. Midtown is home to the High Museum of Art and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. It also borders Atlanta’s iconic Piedmont Park.

    what locals love about homes in Atlanta's Midtown neighborhood

    Live your friendliest life in this modern Midtown house. See more photos here.

     

    Sprawling contemporary home

    $885,000

    Offering a rooftop patio, backyard garden, and chef’s kitchen, this spacious townhouse is the perfect home for entertaining—or just taking a break from the hustle and bustle of Midtown.

     

    Attending Community Events: East Atlanta

    In East Atlanta, you can venture to celebrated music halls, check out vibrant street art, eat at upscale dining hotspots—or you can opt for a little bonding time with your neighbors instead. More than 72 percent of East Atlanta residents say they’ve attended a community event in this area, like a block party or barbecue. Afterward, you can take the family to see the sights at Zoo Atlanta in Grant Park or take a stroll through the gravestones at the famous Oakland Cemetery.

    what locals love about East Atlanta homes

    This East Atlanta home begs for a barbeque. See more photos here.

     

    Charming three-bedroom craftsman

    $360,000

    This sunny East Atlanta home is roomy inside and out. With an enviable front porch, back deck, and spacious yard, you might just host a few community events of your own.

     

     

  • San Francisco, California

    what locals love about San Francisco

    San Franciscans love nature and the holidays. That’s very clear in Bernal Heights and Mission Bay.

    Decorating for the Holidays: Mission Bay

    This sleek, up-and-coming San Francisco neighborhood is full of holiday cheer. More than 70 percent of Mission Bay residents decorate their homes for the holidays, making it a fun spot for the young at heart. Known as a hub for professionals in the science and tech space, Mission Bay has plenty of outdoor activities, too—like kayaking in the bay—that make this area a great time year-round.

    what locals love about San Francisco's Mission Bay neighborhood

    This Mission Bay condo is in the midst of holiday heaven. See more photos here.

     

    Light and bright condo

    $949,000

    Love to be in the middle of the action? Location is everything, and this little condo has it. In the heart of Mission Bay, it has plenty of windows to create a spacious feel, despite the low square footage. Perfect for checking out the neighborhood holiday light displays.

     

    Seeing Nature Outside Your Door: Bernal Heights

    Sitting atop a large hill, Bernal Heights offers a small-town feel in the middle of a big city. Residents even get in touch with nature here, as a whopping 68 percent report they have spotted wild animals outside their door. If a combination of parks and urban boutiques and restaurants sounds like your perfect spot, you might want to hurry—home prices in this area are on the rise as more people discover its charm.

    what locals love about San Francisco's Bernal Heights neighborhoods

    Love critters? Just look around in Bernal Heights. See more photos here.

     

    Beautifully updated multi-family home

    $1,998,000

    Interested in earning a little extra cash? With this updated multi-family unit you can plant your roots and rent out the adjacent unit.

     

     

     

  • Denver, Colorado

    what locals love about Denver

    Whether you’re footloose or have kids in tow, Denver’s Capitol Hill and Montbello are ready for you.

    Having a Walkable Neighborhood: Capitol Hill

    In Denver‘s popular Capitol Hill neighborhood, it’s easy to park your car and forget about it. Or ditch it completely. Not only are there tons of restaurants to walk to (and 93.3 percent of residents do exactly that), but some of the city’s biggest attractions are here—like the Colorado State Capitol, the Denver Art Museum, Colorado History Museum, City Park, and more.

    what locals love about Denver's Capitol Hill neighborhood

    Who needs a car with a front stoop in Capitol Hill? See more photos here.

     

    Hi-rise condo with amenities galore

    $629,900

    With this three-bedroom condo, you can enjoy beautiful views of the Rocky Mountains and soak up the fun of city life. From restaurants to culture, everything you need is right outside your door. And inside? Luxury amenities like an on-site concierge.

     

    Being Kid-Friendly: Montbello

    The Denver area is booming, and the community of Montbello is no exception. Considered one of the hottest suburban home markets in the nation, families love Montbello’s close-knit vibe, beautiful views, and abundant open space. Plus, it’s an area where 86.4 percent of residents say they regularly see kids playing outside.

    What locals love about Denver's Montbello neighborhood

    Call the kids in to eat in this Montbello home. See more photos here.

     

    Four-bedroom gem on a corner lot

    $299,000

    With more than 7,000 square feet of yard space, this Montbello home has plenty of room for the energy of a growing family—and all their neighborhood friends.

     

     

  • Austin, Texas

    what locals love about Austin, Texas

    Whether it’s pets or plants, Austinites love caring for living things—especially in Riverside and Bouldin.

    Being Dog-Friendly: Riverside

    Love your pooch? You’ve come to the right place. More than 94 percent of residents in the pet-friendly, up-and-coming Austin neighborhood of Riverside say they see people walking dogs. Close to the University of Texas and a short drive to Downtown Austin, it’s home to young professionals and students. Major redevelopments underway mean new restaurants and attractions are popping up regularly, too.

    what locals love about Austin's Riverside neighborhood

    This Riverside yard is a dog enthusiast’s dream. See more photos here.

     

    Remodeled home in a quiet spot

    $565,000

    With more than 2,000 square feet of space inside and nearly 8,000 square feet of yard, this Riverside colonial could be home to all dogs as you can handle. And thanks to the quiet street, they won’t even howl at passing cars all day.

     

    Having Pretty Front Yards: Bouldin

    Bouldin is both family-friendly and full of all the things that make Austin famously quirky. You’ll find tattoo shops, food trucks, eccentric art galleries, and second-hand shops—as well as plenty of green thumbs. A reported 81.8 percent of residents take pride in their yard, making Bouldin as pretty as it is funky.

    what locals love about Austin, Bouldin

    Gardeners will love this Bouldin front yard. See more photos here.

     

    Modern home with city views

    $1,400,000

    Not only is this home colorful and fun, this home is also in a prime spot—just one mile from Lady Bird Lake, two miles from Downtown Austin, and a 10-minute drive to the airport.

     

     

Looking for a home in a neighborhood that fits your personality? Find your perfect spot on Trulia.

The post What Locals Love About Their Neighborhoods appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

How to Perfectly Pair Your Décor With Your Home’s Architectural Style

Finding a home requires trade-offs, whether in the house or neighborhood. And though it’s not easy to change your neighborhood, you can certainly change the way your home looks and feels. This is why we’re excited to showcase advice and insights from the Trulia Design Panel, an expert group of interior designers, home stagers, and organizers from across the nation, to help homeowners and renters make their house a home, wherever it is.

America’s Most Popular Architectural Styles

What architectural style do Americans love most, and where are they most likely to find those homes? To find out, a new Trulia survey conducted online by Harris Poll of more than 2,000 Americans age 18 and older asked and found that the top home styles Americans cite as their favorites are craftsman (43%), ranch (41%), and colonial (36%). However, this varies by age. Millennials, age 18–34, were more likely to favor craftsman-style homes (52% vs. 36% of those age 55+), while older adults, age 55+, were more likely favor ranch-style homes (52% vs. 28% of millennials).

Despite the overwhelming popularity of craftsman-style homes, ranch homes are much easier to find on the market. Among all the for-sale home listings on Trulia, the most common architectural styles are colonial, ranch, Cape Cod, Victorian, and mid-century. Though, state by state, it definitely varies.

There are local surprises as well. Although brownstones are practically synonymous with New York City, colonial houses are actually more common in the city. Similarly, although art deco is Miami‘s best-known architectural feature, mid-century homes are by far the most common throughout the city. And if you’re looking for a ranch-style home, Colorado Springs, CO, has the highest proportion of them in the country.

Trulia Design Panel Tips

Given the five most common architectural styles in America, the ones that buyers are more likely to find, the Trulia Design Panel offered their tips on how to decorate for each type of home. Here’s what they suggested:

Colonial

Layne Brookshire of Ms. Placed suggests augmenting your home’s classic style with textured, woven baskets of natural materials like rattan, sisal, or water hyacinth. Houseplants, including dramatic palms and ferns, are also good options to create this effect.

Jay Britto and David Charette of Britto Charette recommend nodding to the colonial style’s spartan take on neoclassical grandeur. Collect handcrafted wooden bowls and ladles, and seek art that involves the crude human figures of the colonial period.

Hannah Crowell of Crowell & Co. suggests a more counterintuitive approach, pairing modern light fixtures and furniture with your home’s traditional architecture. “I find the juxtaposition between the two styles to be endlessly intriguing and interesting.”

The colonial style emphasizes wood tones and handcrafted elements. Becki Owens says you can keep those features feeling fresh with dramatic bright or dark paint choices on walls or furniture.

Ranch

Brookshire suggests embracing the rustic inspiration behind the ranch style with Western-flavored elements like cowhide and leather ottomans, rugs, and pillows. Wood elements like floating shelves, trays, and coat racks also help.

Britto and Charette say ranch style emphasizes social space and natural light. To capitalize on those elements, they recommend using neutrals with no heavy patterns and grabbing a bar cart and serve-ware for entertaining.

“I have a 1960s ranch-style home of my own, and I love it!” Crowell says. She enjoys making modern statements on the style with elements like cement floor tiles, light floor stains, and minimalist trim and molding.

“The ranch looks best when you embrace its modern simplicity,” Owens says. She recommends sticking to clean-lined furniture but adding personality through rattan accents and an eclectic mix of metals.

 

Cape Cod

Brookshire suggests nodding to the Cape Cod style’s East Coast origins with vignettes of nautical items or vintage hardcover books. Accent your home’s cozy simplicity with white or light bedding, sofa slipcovers, and pillows.

Britto and Charette also recommend emulating the simplicity and function of architectural style in your décor. They suggest painting walls in “tried-and-true” neutrals like Benjamin Moore® Decorator’s White.

As always, Crowell embraces the unexpected, suggesting Cape Cod owners keep original moldings and details while adding aesthetic surprises, such as modern tiling, windows, and furnishings.

Owens recommends taking advantage of a Cape Cod’s charming, symmetrical exterior by focusing on curb appeal with floral boxes or large planters.

Victorian

Brookshire recommends hearkening back to this architectural style’s namesake era by choosing lace, ribbon, or embroidered linens in neutral or white for tablecloths, curtains, and bedding. Mismatched antique furnishings are also a good look.

Britto and Charette recommend painting baseboards dark espresso or high-gloss black to mimic the dark wood elements that were popular in the era. To add personality, follow another Victorian tradition and fill a curio with collectibles.

Victorians enthusiastically embraced patterns, but Owens suggests modernizing by wallpapering one feature wall while keeping others neutral. An ornate furniture piece can also make a nice accent.

 

 

Mid-century

Brookshire suggests starting simply and inexpensively by swapping out the legs on your existing furniture for the tapered legs characteristic of the mid-century style. A low-profile sofa or arched floor lamp are other easy ways to achieve this style.

Britto and Charette also say the right furniture is crucial, but price can be an issue. “Don’t go for original,” they warn, suggesting instead to find modern designers and stores whose products mimic the style of the time period.

Crowell says her own style leans toward mid-century, but she likes to balance its modern aesthetic with antique pieces.

Owens recommends giving a mid-century home an update with a new paint job. “White always looks fresh, or consider a dramatic, dark tone paired with medium wood accents,” she says.

Methodology: Trulia analyzed all for-sale listing descriptions nationwide and at each state level in all 50 states since 2012 to identify the most common property types that were listed in each location. Property types included: art deco, brownstone, Cape Cod, Colonial, contemporary, craftsman, French Provincial, Georgian, Greek Revival, mid-century, ranch, Tudor, and Victorian.

Survey Methodology: This survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Poll on behalf of Trulia February 6th–8th, 2018 among 2,079 U.S. adults ages 18 and older. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables and subgroup sample sizes, please contact pr@trulia.com.

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Can You Guess the Price of These Mini Rentals?

Tiny homes are still going strong as a popular choice for rentals—and there’s no sign of the trend stopping. Many renters are used to the idea of living in itty-bitty studios in order to enjoy the excitement of living in an urban area. However, suburban and rural minimalist homes for rent can often be just as a fabulous. But are they a steal, or will you pay big for the tiny home lifestyle? Across the country, the answer is a mixed bag. Check out these tiny homes for rent, and take your best guess at how much they cost per month.

 

minimalist home

With custom features like built-in shelves, this bungalow promises to be a cozy home. See more photos here.

Billings, Montana

Petite bungalow near the University of Montana

(Click for price.)

In Montana’s largest city, you won’t be surrounded by the open range that comes to mind when you think of the state. But you will still get gorgeous mountain views, and you’ll be close to outdoor recreation. For example, in the North Park neighborhood where this blue, 480-square-foot bungalow is located, you’re minutes away from hiking in Shields Park (which has 60 acres of unspoiled nature ready to explore year-round). If you’d rather hike to entertainment options, North Park has you covered. Since it’s also the home of the University of Montana – Billings, there are a few low-key options that appeal to both students and full-time residents—like City Brew Coffee and 406 Kitchen & Taproom—a mere four blocks from your home. Since this charming one-bedroom is priced well below North Park’s median rent, you could buy your new neighbors the next round.

 

minimalist home

Quaint is an understatement for this Midwestern cottage in an idyllic, walkable neighborhood. See more photos here.

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Sunny two-bedroom on a tree-lined street

(Click for price.)

If you gravitate toward vintage homes, you’ll love the Alger Heights neighborhood of Grand Rapids. Here, petite cottages, ranches, and other charming home styles line the streets, along with old-growth trees. These sights, plus the fact that it’s mostly all residential, make this section of the city feel like a throwback to the 1950s in the best way. You can safely walk your dog or ride your bike down to the MacKay-Jaycees Park, a popular spot for local baseball games and picnics. Or, closer by, catch up with neighbors at the pocket-size Paris Park (a green space two blocks south of this sweet little home). There are also some signs the neighborhood is coming into the 21st century—the industrial-styled gastropub The Old Goat just south of Alger Street SE has become a favorite hangout for locals. As with many neighborhoods with more single-family homes than apartments, rents can trend a little higher. Yet this 637-square-foot two-bedroom is still below Alger Heights’ median rent.

 

minimalist home

This perfectly cute house in a perfect Austin, Texas spot is full of fun—including a bright green shower. See more photos here.

Austin, Texas

Quirky home near fantastic shopping

(Click for price.)

Old meets new in the city’s Old West Austin neighborhood. Though it’s historical—this section dates back to the mid-1800s—the look is constantly evolving. You’ll still find the old homes that make this neighborhood sought-after, but many have been expanded or updated. For instance, this simple, 675-square-foot bungalow was added to a bigger property as a guest house. Still, it has plenty of character, from the micro front porch to the gnarled old tree in its tiny front yard. The biggest draw is the fact that it’s located right around the corner from N. Lamar Blvd, one of Austin‘s best shopping and entertainment districts. From the boho boutique Kick Pleat to the Mexican food window Fresa’s, you can walk to indie places (and even mainstream retailers like Whole Foods) with ease. Location is everything, so remember that when you guess the rent.

 

minimalist homes

Living above a garage has never been more chic. Check out the angled ceiling and modern appliances. See more photos here.

Broomfield, Colorado

Elegant carriage house in a quiet development

(Click for price.)

Located north of Denver and southeast of Boulder, Broomfield is a popular commuter hub that’s grown into a city. The city designation can feel misleading at times since Broomfield’s overall character feels like a series of well-planned suburban developments. There aren’t official neighborhoods, and instead of one main downtown area, there are two shopping districts populated by chain restaurants and shops. That doesn’t mean it’s all big box stores—you’ll also find the upscale Omni Interlocken hotel and spa. But most of Broomfield’s residential streets are purely residential, making for a quiet and peaceful atmosphere. This magazine-ready, 550-square-foot carriage house sits on a winding street with other well-designed homes, all connected via roomy sidewalks to the large Broadlands West Park.

 

minimalist homes

A garage is a big deal for a little home. It’ll hold plenty of trikes in this family-friendly neighborhood. See more photos here.

Portland, Oregon

1930s cottage at the end of a quiet street

(Click for price.)

Interestingly named for the German word for “butcher,” Portland‘s Metzger neighborhood feels slightly more conventional than the city’s famous downtown. Here, you won’t find obscure record shops, but you will find darling little homes and suburban standbys like Costco and Target. This, combined with good schools, makes Metzger particularly popular with families. However, empty-nesters have been moving in at a steady rate, too. For them, the appeal might be in smaller-sized vintage homes that are still available here—like this 683-square-foot, 1930s home. If you’re looking for a little excitement, its proximity to I-5 gets you to all the quirkier offerings downtown in less than 15 minutes. Though it’s a short ride, you’d be surprised at just how this home’s rent compares to the median price of Portland.

 

minimalist homes

Fisherman’s Wharf is world famous. This tidy studio could be your own small piece of it. See more photos here.

San Francisco, California

Open and airy studio in a classic San Francisco neighborhood

(Click for price.)

If you know anything about San Francisco, odds are good you’ve heard of the Fisherman’s Wharf neighborhood. This is where you can board a cruise to Alcatraz, climb the historic Coit Tower to see 360-degree views of the city, climb the steep Greenwich Steps or Filbert Street Stairs, and brush up on your denim knowledge at Levi’s Plaza. Living here is like living in a postcard of San Francisco. This bright, 477-square-foot studio is within walking distance of all of the above attractions, but it doesn’t mean you’d be limited to playing tourist 365 days a year. (Though we would definitely endorse Tulipmania and its 39,000 blooms in February.) You can do light grocery shopping around the corner at RJ’s Market, workout across the street at Bay Club San Francisco, or board a streetcar two blocks away at The Embarcadero & Sansome Street stop for the rest of your errands. Your commute never looked so good, but like everything else in San Francisco, expect to pay a premium.

 

minimalist homes

If you love the unique face of this wee house, wait until you see all the windows and wainscoting inside. See more photos here.

Seattle, Washington

Quaint home in an up-and-coming neighborhood

(Click for price.)

As the tech boom continues to shake up Seattle, those looking to find a close-knit (and reasonably-priced) community continue to explore lesser-known neighborhoods. Mount Baker, located southeast of downtown Seattle, is one of those on-the-rise areas. Here, the streets are lined with some of the most adorable little cottages you’ll see in the city—this 470-square-foot, one-bedroom home is in good company—instead of high-rise condos. This, along with the lush trees and often beautifully-landscaped yards, makes Mount Baker feel a world away from the hectic pace you’ll find in more built-up neighborhoods. Take a walk to Rainier Avenue S. for takeout from any one of the diverse restaurants (from soul food to pho), enjoy it at home in front of the freestanding fireplace, then try to tell us that this isn’t the good life. And you may be surprised to learn that it’s more affordable than one might assume for Seattle.

 

minimalist homes

With lively tile and breezy windows, this place is a beach lover’s paradise. Who needs square footage? See more photos here.

Long Beach, California

Cozy one-bedroom with ocean views

(Click for price.)

Long Beach‘s name isn’t a misnomer—there really is a nice, long beach here. But like everywhere else in California, the shores attract lots of visitors. This is especially true here because of tourist attractions like the RMS Queen Mary, the Aquarium of the Pacific, and museums like the Long Beach Museum of Art. So if you crave the water without the crowds, Belmont Shore is the place to be. It’s almost entirely residential, with narrow streets and close-together homes that tend to discourage gawkers. Locals enjoy the quiet Seaside Walk (a serene boardwalk) for ocean views, but you just have to look out your window to enjoy a spectacular scene. This 530-square-foot furnished rental is the upstairs suite of a sweet cottage, giving you a boost that gives you an even better look at those beach views. If you have a boat—or know of someone who does—definitely take a fast trip across the bay to Ballast Point Brewing Long Beach.

 

minimalist homes

With dirt sidewalks and incredible views, Seattle’s earthy Ravenna neighborhood is an appropriate spot for this sweet stone cottage. See more photos here.

Seattle, Washington

Unusual stone home in a bike-friendly area

(Click for price.)

Situated right near the popular open-air shopping at University Village, the Ravenna neighborhood is a surprisingly peaceful little oasis that feels a little less manicured—but no less stylish—than others in Seattle. For one, it’s not unusual to find dirt sidewalks (particularly on NE Blakeley Street), and the local landscape makes it easy to envision Ravenna’s past as Seattle’s wilderness. (You can also see evidence of this in the woodsy wonderland of Ravenna Park.) This unique, 600-square-foot stone cottage is right off NE Blakeley Street, which is right next to the Burke-Gilman Trail. This bikeable and walkable path stretches 27 miles through Seattle, making it possible to commute without a car (and without traffic worries). With what you’ll save on parking, gas, and auto maintenance, this home could be a better deal than you might think at first glance.

Originally published October 2, 2017; updated February 16, 2018. 

Ready to find your own tiny home? Search for rentals of any size right here on Trulia.

The post Can You Guess the Price of These Mini Rentals? appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

How to Tell if You’ll Love a New Neighborhood

When searching for a new place to live, don’t feel confined to your current location. Yes, buying a home is a big commitment, but it’s also an opportunity to make a change and venture out into a new neighborhood or a new town altogether. But how will you know if a new area is really for you or if you’ll end up with buyers’ remorse soon after closing the deal? With a little bit of forethought and exploration, it’s easy to feel confident about your potential new neighborhood. Here’s where to start.

Ask yourself these five questions when choosing a home base.

What do you need to have nearby?

Yoga studio owner Annalisa Berns moved from Los Angeles to Big Bear, California, four years ago because she had an epiphany during her housing search—not only did she want to live in the mountains, but she also wanted a community that came equipped with a health food store and other yogis. “Those two things were critical to me,” she says.

Think about your day-to-day life, brainstorm the things that are important to you, then make a list of the amenities that you can’t do without. If living near a yoga studio or specific type of food store is a must-have, drive around the areas closest to those businesses to find pockets of neighborhoods that meet your needs.

Is walking important to you?

For a lot of people, not having stores or eateries within convenient walking distance is a definite no-go, so you should consider if it’s one for you, too. When scoping out at a potential new address, be sure to check Trulia’s amenity maps which pinpoint grocery stores, cafes, salons, and more to get the lay of the land.

“Walkability index is a biggie for me and my husband,” says avid sailor Dana Greyson. She and her husband factor in commutes when they search for housing back on dry land. “We want to have a place where, when we get home, we don’t have to get back into our car to live our life.”

Are you going for a quiet or lively environment?

You may love to hang out and party with friends in a certain bustling neighborhood every weekend, but would you want to buy a home there? Maybe not. Portland, Oregon, resident and realtor Jenelle Isaacson sees a lot of folks in the young, hipster city drawn to the most happening areas, only to find out they don’t exactly match their priorities—or noise-level preference.

“I’ve worked with many clients who are lured to a neighborhood by popular restaurants and coffee shops,” she says. “They want to hang their hats where they hang out on weekends, but when it comes to living in these areas, they suddenly find they don’t like the nuisance of so many other people coming to their neighborhood parking, making noise at night. Being in the middle of the party isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.”

The takeaway here? Reconcile the fact that if you love an area for its lively atmosphere, lots of others probably do too. Weigh the importance of having hot spots nearby with the importance of a good night’s sleep.

Do you want to have friends nearby?

Whether your besties are already in the neighborhood or you want to chum it up with your new neighbors, you should take into account the kind of social life you hope to have in your brand new home base. Atlanta, Georgia, veteran Carol Gee knew her new community was the one when a neighbor waved to her from across the street as Gee and her husband moved boxes—and they became longtime friends.

Think about how your new home is situated. If you’re on a cul-de-sac or across the courtyard from another neighbor, there’s going to be some required water cooler talk chat. “Some people really like to be in an area where their friends are nearby or at least close enough so they’ll come visit,” says real estate specialist Kathleen Perkins. Others not so much.

After you’ve done your research, does it seem like a place where you’d want to live?

Once you’ve done your due diligence, visiting your potential neighborhood during different hours of the day to get a real sense of it and checking to ensure all the boxes are checked on your must-have list, trust your gut.

Some say intuition is a gift, so go with it. If a neighborhood just feels right, it probably is. On the flip side, if anything gives you pause—hit the pause button. It may be time to try and reach out to residents (or realtors) who actually live there to get a first-hand perspective of what everyday life is like, or it may be time to move on.

 

Even moving just a few blocks or miles can make for a totally new neighborhood feel. Do your research, then go with your gut.

 

Articles that might be useful:

Originally published April 7, 2015; updated February 16, 2018.

The post How to Tell if You’ll Love a New Neighborhood appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

The Best Places to Live in America’s New Tech Hubs

AT A GLANCE
  • Silicon Valley doesn’t have a monopoly on great tech jobs anymore—tech companies are opening in mid-sized cities across America.
  • These new tech hubs offer promising job opportunities, plus more affordable home prices.
  • Wondering where to begin a home search? Trulia’s search data points the way to the neighborhoods locals love in these cities.

There’s no shortage of good tech jobs in Silicon Valley and San Francisco, of course. But with the median home price topping $1 million, even highly paid tech workers can have trouble making ends meet. Fortunately, several mid-sized cities across the country are experiencing their own tech booms, with startups galore and plenty of job openings. And, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, this is just the beginning. The BLS predicts that over the next decade employment in tech will grow 13 percent, faster than the average for all other occupations.

So, where are these new tech hubs? Everywhere from Alabama to Colorado. Here’s a look at four cities where job prospects are growing rapidly and where a tech salary (which averages $109,000 nationwide according to industry nonprofit CompTIA) will go a lot farther in the housing market.

As a home-buying headstart for people looking to relocate for a job, we dug into Trulia’s data to find out which neighborhood or suburb in each of these tech hubs gets the most searches by locals—in other words, by the people who know the area best. If you’re up for relocating, consider it a sweet spot for starting your home search.

 

best places to live near tech companies

The best places to live near tech companies in Huntsville, Alabama

Huntsville, aka “Rocket City,” is booming, with jobs in aeronautics and other tech industries up 309 percent.

1. Huntsville, Alabama

Where to Work 

Since the early days of the space age in the 1950s and ’60s, engineers have flocked to Huntsville, aka “Rocket City,” to join the teams at NASA, McDonnell Douglas, and Boeing. These companies landed Department of Defense contracts and produced more and more spin-off companies, all requiring engineering and tech talent, says John Norris, chief economist at Oakworth Capital Bank in Birmingham, Alabama. More recently, Huntsville has attracted Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ space venture, Blue Origin, which is investing $200 million to build its BE-4 rocket engine here, and Aerojet Rocketdyne, which is bringing 800 new jobs to town. It all adds up: ZipRecruiter data shows tech jobs in Huntsville up a whopping 309 percent in 2017 over 2016.

Where to Live: Madison

Part of what attracts companies to Huntsville, Alabama’s second largest city, is its low cost of living. With a median home price of $150,000, housing in Huntsville leaves tech workers with plenty of disposable income. Even in Madison, a bedroom community west of Huntsville that’s the most popular among locals searching for homes on Trulia, the median price for a house—$190,000—is still less than the nationwide median. The suburb, once covered in cotton and soybean fields, is now a hot housing market “with good schools and new shopping areas,” says local agent Sid Pugh. “And local officials are pursuing a minor league baseball team and stadium.” All this is enjoyed, says Pugh, by “a good mix of the old Madison residents and up-and-coming engineers who are new to the area.”

The best places to live near tech companies in Huntsville, Alabama

best places to live near tech companies best places to live near tech companies

 

The best places to live near tech companies in Detroit, Michigan

With automakers hiring software engineers and Google coming to town, tech jobs in Detroit are up 81 percent.

2. Detroit, Michigan

Where to Work 

The overall unemployment rate in Detroit inched down 1.2 percent last year, reports the BLS—but employment in tech was absolutely on fire. Tech jobs shot up 81 percent in 2017 over 2016, landing the city on ZipRecruiter’s list of fastest-growing tech towns in the U.S. The growth is being driven by Detroit’s traditional employers, the big automakers, who are hiring more and more software engineers. Google is also moving an office up from Birmingham, Alabama, and will be joining a cluster of tech companies, including Twitter and Microsoft, on and around the Madison Block downtown. Meanwhile, TechTown, a Detroit incubator that has helped companies create 1,300 jobs since 2007, continues to nurture new startups into existence.

Where to Live: Dearborn Heights

Even after Detroit’s home values leaped 18 percent last year, the city remains one of the nation’s most affordable. Indeed counts Detroit in the top 10 cities where tech salaries go furthest, once you factor in the local cost of living. In fact, with a median home price of just $49,580, Trulia’s data shows that school teachers, who have a median income of $63,000, can afford 75 percent of homes for sale in the area—so software engineers should have no trouble at all.

The median home price is higher—$123,000—in Dearborn Heights, a suburb west of downtown where locals search Trulia for homes in more than anywhere else in the Detroit metro area. And demand is high. “Dearborn Heights is rocking,” says Jeff Darwish, a local agent. It’s the “little sister” to nearby Dearborn, where Ford’s campus is undergoing a $1.2 billion redevelopment. Homes in both suburbs are selling quickly, and new restaurants and shops are opening for business. People are drawn to Dearborn Heights’ diversity, Darwish says, as well as its easy freeway access and proximity to the airport and downtown. “People—including engineers and tech workers—are coming in from all over.”

The best places to live near tech companies in Detroit, Michigan

best places to live near tech companies best places to live near tech companies

 

The best places to live near tech companies in Denver, Colorado

Denver’s vibrant startup scene fueled an 81 percent jump in tech jobs last year.

3. Denver, Colorado

Where to Work 

Thanks to a business-friendly city government and a well-educated workforce, Denver’s startup scene has developed real momentum. The city ranks as one of the top U.S. cities for entrepreneurs and tech startups—higher than both San Francisco and Silicon Valley—according to the 2017 Kauffman Index of Startup Activity. Warehouses are being remade into hip HQs at a  rapid clip. CBRE reports that the tech industry has become the biggest customer of downtown office space. And things are only heating up. HomeAdvisor, which connects consumers to home repair pros online, is opening a new office in Denver’s RiNo neighborhood, in part to be more attractive to its millennial workers. Meanwhile, Ibotta, a shopping app developer, just keeps expanding its downtown HQ, and the marketing email company SendGrid is in growth mode, too. Even bigger things may be in store: Amazon has narrowed its search for its massive second headquarters to 20 cities, and Denver is on the shortlist.

Where to Live: Aurora

Denver’s housing market is hot—the median price went up 7 percent in 2017 over 2016 to $385,000. Trulia data shows that it’s also one of the nation’s top-10 fastest-moving housing markets—houses do not sit on the market long. Newcomers are flocking to Aurora, a suburb east of Denver that gets more home searches by locals than anywhere else in the area. Buyers look to Aurora for relatively affordable newer houses with big yards within an easy commuting distance of downtown, says local agent Jani Bielenberg.

The best places to live near tech companies in Denver, Colorado

The best places to live near tech companies in Denver, Colorado The best places to live near tech companies in Denver, Colorado

 

The best places to live near tech companies in Austin, Texas

Austin’s 5,500 tech companies are thriving—and hiring—earning the city the nickname “Silicon Hills.”

4. Austin, Texas

Where to Work 

Austin is no newcomer to tech—Michael Dell founded Dell Computers here back in the ’80s. Since then, it’s only been up and up for a place known as “Silicon Hills.” Glassdoor data puts Austin near the top of the list of cities that gained the biggest share of software jobs between 2012 and 2017. Innovate Austin counts 5,500 tech companies in the area, plus 46 incubators, accelerators and maker and co-working spaces, all places where startups are born. And, last year, jobs at Austin’s top 100 tech companies grew by 11 percent, reports Built In Austin. Salaries, too, are high compared to the cost of living. Indeed put Austin third on its list of cities where tech salaries go furthest, one notch above San Francisco.

Dell, IBM, and Apple are among the city’s top employers—and Amazon, Facebook, and Google all have offices here, too. Meanwhile, up-and-comers like Turnkey Vacation Rentals and ESO Solutions are growing at a rapid clip. And, in a recent boost, it was announced that Austin is among the 20 cities still in the running to be home to Amazon’s second headquarters.

Where to Live: Cedar Park

Austin is the fastest-growing market in the nation, with a staggering 12 percent population growth, Trulia data shows. And with an average listing price of $579,552 and a low inventory of homes for sale, house-hunting is no cakewalk. Austinites looking for homes on Trulia focus their searches on suburban areas, with Cedar Park topping the list. Home buyers are drawn to the relatively affordable suburb for its good schools, nearby Metro rail line stop, and proximity to jobs in northwest Austin. Cedar Park also has lots of new home developments and “all the good restaurants,” says local real estate agent Perry Henderson. “It has just exploded.”

The best places to live near tech companies in Austin, Texas

The best places to live near tech companies in Austin, Texas The best places to live near tech companies in Austin, Texas

 

 

METHODOLOGY: Trulia identified the ZIP code in each of these metro areas that had the most home searches by locals of that metro area from December 2016 to December 2017.

 

Which of these cities would you up and move to for a great job? Tell us in the comments.

The post The Best Places to Live in America’s New Tech Hubs appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

How to Get Acquainted With Your Neighborhood

Moving to a new neighborhood is tough, and it gets harder when the move includes relocating to a new city or neighborhood. Finding your sense of place within a new-to-you community is not always straightforward. Meeting people in your neighborhood can be a bit intimidating, but it’s the most direct route to make a new community feel like your home.

Here are tips to feeling like part of your new neighborhood, whether you’re moving across town or across the country.

 

Make the first move.

Sure, it can feel daunting to approach a new next-door neighbor and introduce yourself, but they may be equally hesitant to disturb your family, particularly if you seem busy moving boxes and unpacking. So take the initiative and look for an opportunity when the neighbors don’t look rushed or preoccupied either. A wave or hello can open the door without being intrusive, and a simple question about the trash pickup schedule on the block or what local grocery store someone recommends is an easy conversation starter.

Make yourself approachable.

Likewise, create chances for others to welcome you. Sit on the front porch. Take leisurely walks. Or perhaps just focus on being approachable—slow down the usual mad dash to your car every morning and tone down the grumpy expression upon returning from work.

The same rule applies when you’re out and about in the community. At the local diner, pick a bar seat instead of a corner table; there’s something about communal seating that encourages conversation. Take the kids to a nearby playground or park—and don’t keep your face in your phone. Make eye contact, smile, and say hello.

Check out the local hangouts.

Do as the locals do and frequent a local restaurant, farmers market, or shop. Got a dog? Even better. Dog parks practically require you and your pet to make new friends. Soon enough, one of these local hangouts will become a place where at least a few people know your name.

Get involved.

There’s no better way to meet like-minded people than by participating in activities that are meaningful to you. Finding the right fit may just require a little digging. Check with local schools and universities, park districts, recreation commissions, sports organizations, and—perhaps the greatest reference of all—neighbors and fellow parents. Donating your time to community organizations the improve the neighborhood by cleaning up trash, helping other residents, or clearing park trails will help you meet people and get to know the neighborhood.

Parents, of course, have many ready-made outlets for making new friends, like volunteering at the school, getting involved in carpools, and hosting playdates or a Halloween party for the kids on the block.

Use your network.

Take advantage of organized programs that can help you meet others in your new community. If you were active in a church or place of worship in your previous home, ask for a referral to a similar establishment. Many employers offer programs that connect newly relocated workers with longtime residents.

Most colleges and universities also have local alumni chapters. And don’t forget to mine your online networks. Ask Facebook friends if they know anyone in your new town, or search sites like Meetup.com to find others with similar interests. With a little time, you’ll find that community is wherever you make it.

 

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Get to know more about the place you’ve chosen to live with Trulia’s maps detailing schools, crime stats, affordability, and more.

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What Is Renters Insurance?

The first thing people think about when they rent a new place is getting renters insurance to protect their belongings, right? No, not really. Almost all homeowners have homeowners insurance—95 percent of them, according to the Insurance Information Institute. Mortgage lenders require it, after all. But only about 40 percent of renters buy renters insurance. If you’re a renter, you may be wondering: What is renters insurance? And how much does it cost? Most policies cost about $15 a month. But the scenarios that renters insurance covers are broader than you might think. Here are some essentials to know when deciding whether to buy a policy.

What is renters insurance?

Renters insurance is a type of insurance that covers your personal property. If someone breaks into your rental and steals your belongings, your landlord typically is not responsible … unless you can prove the landlord was negligent by, say, not providing a lock for your doors or windows. Otherwise, you’ll have to pay to replace what was taken or damaged. But renters insurance would cover the cost of replacing the items. It also often covers damage to your belongings from fire, vandalism, and other disasters.

Renters insurance covers your stuff even when it’s not in your home.

Any valuables you keep in your car or that you bring with you, such as on vacation, are covered by most renters insurance policies. Renters insurance will reimburse you the same amount whether your bike is stolen from inside your apartment or while parked outside your favorite coffee shop, but whether your insurance pays what your property is worth (actual cash value) or the cost to replace it (replacement-cost coverage) depends on the details of your policy.

It covers damage to other people’s stuff, too.

Your renters insurance policy sticks with you when you (or, say, your kids) go out into the world, such as to a friend’s house or shopping. “If your kids decide to play around in the china department of a store, can you afford to pay for the damages to the merchandise?” asks Eric Narcisco, CEO of Effective Coverage. “That’s property damage liability, and renters insurance pays for that.”

You could stay in a hotel in case of emergency.

If your rental unit is unlivable for a time because of damages from a fire or a storm, the cost of a temporary hotel stay would likely be covered by renters insurance. Your policy should kick in even if your neighbor has a fire and management has to turn off utilities to your building for a few days to make repairs. “Loss-of-use coverage on your policy could take care of that for you,” says Narcisco.

You’re covered if someone gets hurt on your watch.

What if one of your friends is injured in your apartment? If a friend rolls an ankle because they stepped on your dog’s chew toy in your living room, you’re liable for the medical costs. You’d also be accountable for legal costs if your guest filed a lawsuit. But if you have renters insurance, the liability part of the policy will cover that. It also covers damage to the apartment that you cause, such as water damage from letting a bathtub overflow. The landlord will probably sue you to pay for damages not covered by your security deposit, and that’s when your insurance would kick in.

Third-party property damage? Covered.

Let’s look further into that overflowing-bathtub scenario. What if, in addition to damaging your apartment, the overflowing tub also caused damage to your downstairs neighbor’s unit? Or what if you drove your car into your neighbor’s fence? Renters insurance would typically cover the cost of repairs in both instances.

An important note about property damage: Renters insurance doesn’t typically cover damage done to your rental property by another person. If someone were to break your window, for example, and that person doesn’t have renters insurance, you’d be on your own for working out the costs.

But not everything is covered, so read the fine print.

Note that renters insurance comes with coverage limits, so it’s important to know what is and isn’t covered in the policy you select. It’s up to you to decide how much liability and personal property coverage to buy. For example, you might decide to get $300,000 in liability coverage and $50,000 in personal property coverage.

And there are state-by-state exceptions for disaster coverage: California renters, for instance, are not covered for damages from an earthquake, and Florida tenants are not covered for damages from a natural flood. Those usually require a separate policy. Your policy will spell out in detail which scenarios and disasters are covered.

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8 Cozy Country Cottages for Sale Under $200,000

When looking for a home, there are a few things you’re going to consider: location, price, size, and (maybe) style. We’d like to add one more thing to your list—the aww factor. It’s the emotional pull that a particularly adorable home brings. It can make you fall in love the minute you step into the driveway. No style has more “aww” than a classic cottage, particularly when it’s in a storybook setting. Plus, since cottages tend to be on the smaller side, you can often find great bargains. Don’t believe us? We’ve rounded up eight country cottages under $200,000 that are the very definition of enchanting.

 

country cottages under $200K

1. Greentown, Pennsylvania

Classic cottage near a lake

$69,900

Summer is when Greentown shines. That’s because life in this small village near the Poconos revolves around Lake Wallenpaupack, a popular spot for fishing and boating. But the village has its charms year-round, especially if you’re into outdoor pursuits. For instance, the general area is very popular for hunting, and the rural beauty of Greentown is especially gorgeous in the snowy season. While it’s a bit remote, (there’s a small grocery store in town, and that’s about it), you’re not too far from civilization. Scranton is a quick drive on nearby I-84, as is Port Jervis, New York where you can—believe it or not—pick up a train to New York City.

This cheery, mid-century, two-bedroom cottage is surrounded by trees, giving you a lovely view no matter the season—especially from the enclosed porch. You’re close to the aforementioned highways along with lots of parkland, giving you the ideal location for work-life balance.

 

country cottages under $200K

2. Alton, New Hampshire

Roomy, storybook home in the woods

$175,000

Alton is part of the vacation-friendly Lakes Region of New Hampshire, where summer resorts have thrived for decades. It’s located on the water in the scenic cove of Alton Bay, off of Lake Winnipesaukee. Alton is a great choice for those who enjoy the beauty of the region but aren’t huge fans of the summer crowds. Tourists stick mostly to the campgrounds on the shore of the lake, and anyone else passing through is likely en route to the nearby mountains: Rocky Mountain, Pine Mountain, Cedar Mountain, Mount Major—need we go on? Hiking and skiing are the things to do here, so if you’re the type who is at L.L. Bean so often that you could send the staff Christmas cards, Alton is for you. There’s also a great garden center (Alton Home & Garden) and a beer/wine-making supply shop (Kettle to Keg Homebrew).

At 1,338-square-feet, this two-bedroom home has plenty of space for your hobbies. Built in 1910, living in this cottage is like stepping back in time. From the shutters to the stone fireplace, this cozy home looks kind of like a place Goldilocks would visit.

 

country cottages under $200K

3. Hayesville, North Carolina

Sweet chalet in the mountains

$99,900

Living in Hayesville is like living in a postcard—you’re surrounded by some of the most dramatically beautiful vistas in the state, which range from mountains to lakes. What you won’t be surrounded by? People. Located near the North Carolina-Georgia border, Hayesville has a population of fewer than 350 people. It’s an ideal town for aspiring Thoreau-types who have grown tired of the packed sidewalks of cities or the constant traffic in big suburbs. While you won’t find any trendy bars in Hayesville, you will find something to do beyond relaxing on Chatuge Lake or hiking the famed mountain trails in the region. (You’re near the Blue Ridge Mountains, along with the Appalachian Trail.) From sampling vintages at Eagle Fork Vineyards to indulging in a hot fudge sundae at the old-fashioned ice cream counter Chinquapins in the historic (and tiny) downtown square, you’ll quickly understand why weekenders love this town.

For such a beautiful destination, you’d expect sky-high prices and huge weekend homes. That’s not really the case here. For less than $100,000, you can call this downright adorable two-bedroom cottage yours. Even better? It’s right on the lake.

 

country cottages under $200K

4. Running Springs, California

Vintage home with rustic character

$113,000

If you want to find a bargain in California, you have to head away from the coasts and cities. And up a mountain. Sitting 6,000 feet above sea level, the town of Running Springs is mainly known as a ski destination. (Locals take advantage of the weekday discounts—and the free birthday admission—to Snow Valley Ski Area, a favorite since the 1930s.) There’s plenty of snow to enjoy, but the winters are mild. Plus, summers offer events like the Mountain Top Days—a community-wide celebration that includes a chili cook-off and outdoor concerts. The lack of big chain stores adds to the charm, though you can find all the essentials you’ll need on Hilltop Boulevard. While the small-town vibe and uniquely beautiful scenery make Running Springs feel remote, it’s only 90 minutes east of Los Angeles.

Located in Smiley Park Country Club, this 1930, two-bedroom home is a throwback to the town’s heyday. Vintage-home lovers will hone in on the period details and quirky charm, from the stone fireplace to the beamed ceilings. A little cosmetic TLC, and this is a gem that’ll shine.

 

country cottages under $200K

5. Corvallis, Montana

1920s home with an unexpected modern layout

$194,000

Derived from the French words for “heart” and “valley,” Corvallis lives up to its name. This is the kind of small town where you’ll get to know all your neighbors. There’s just a handful of hangouts for the fewer than 1,000 people who live in the region. By “handful,” we mean three: The Memories Cafe, the Corvallis Tavern, and Wild Mare (a western-themed bar). So, what’s everyone doing here, aside from enjoying the year-round Christmas shop The Brooks? Probably taking in the scenery. Corvallis is home to the Teller Wildlife Refuge and is part of the beautiful Bitterroot Valley region. What Corvallis lacks in excitement, it makes up for in stunning natural beauty—perhaps this is why the town is home to a few artists and studios, like Aspen Hot Glass.

If you want to have your own studio, this recently updated two-bedroom cottage might be for you. Built in 1920, the two-bedroom home was remodeled to maximize the interior light—a must for any artist. This effect was achieved by creating a more open floor plan, another feature that helps you get creative. Art studio in the living room? Why not?

 

country cottages under $200K

6. Moodus, Connecticut

Tiny cottage near the water

$59,900

Moodus is a country getaway that was super popular in the 1940s and 1950s when this village had the nickname the “Catskills of Connecticut.” You can still see glimpses of this past in the area’s vintage buildings. If you love history, you’ll definitely feel at home here. There’s even a ghost town (Johnsonville Village), a house museum (Amasa Day House), and the Machimoodus State Park, where you can take in great views of the region from a lookout point on Mt. Tom (including the adjacent Sunrise State Park, a former summer resort).

Though the woods are beautiful, they’re also home to an unusual phenomenon called “Moodus Noises.” Described as kind of a low screaming, this unexpected noise comes from micro-earthquakes. The good news? You can’t hear them from this tiny two-bedroom home on the other side of town. The roomy yard makes up for its size, along with deck space, an enclosed dining porch, and a pier on the Connecticut River. Plus, it’s just across the river from The Gillette Castle, a mansion inspired by a medieval castle.

 

country cottages under $200K

7. Deer Park, Washington

Sweet little bungalow with a huge lot

$84,900

With just 4,000 residents, Deer Park has the feel of a small country town. It’s a tight-knit community with a lot of local pride, which comes out in full-force during the town’s three big annual events: Winterfest, a family-oriented celebration held in January that includes outhouse races and a craft fair; a summer concert series held in Mix Park; and Deer Park Settler’s Day, the oldest community celebration in Washington, held every July. The year-round entertainment options are similarly down-to-earth and mainly revolve around the local bowling alley. You’d swear you were in the Midwest if it wasn’t for the breathtaking mountain landscape surrounding Deer Park. And when you want a little taste of city life, Spokane is a 20-mile drive away.

This 1900 bungalow is as quaint as you’d expect for Deer Park, complete with a white picket fence. The blue and white charmer is also technically zoned “central commercial” in case you are looking to start your own small business. The price is just right if you’d rather invest more of your budget in your new venture.

 

country cottages under $200K

8. Englewood, Tennessee

Little red house with an unexpected interior

$89,000

With a low cost of living and plenty of natural beauty, Englewood might be ideal for retirees—or anyone on a budget. The town dates back to the early 1900s when Englewood was a thriving hub for textile production. (You can see glimpses of its past at the Englewood Textile Museum.) Located almost halfway between Chattanooga and Knoxville, Englewood is the very definition of a rural retreat. There isn’t a main street, or touristy areas, just the splendor of the Great Smoky Mountains nearby. Your Walmart and supermarkets are in nearby Athens, while Target and other suburban standbys are about a half-hour away in Cleveland. What we’re trying to say is that you should really love peace and quiet if you decide to live here.

The serene atmosphere makes this rural one-bedroom house feel like a retreat. Though the exterior is appropriately quaint, inside you’ll find a huge open-concept layout with polished hardwood floors. And there’s vintage charm too—like stained glass windows and built-in shelves.

Originally published May 5, 2015; updated January 29, 2018.

Looking for a cutesy cottage in your area? See what’s available near you, right here on Trulia.

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9 Cities That Have Big Apartments with Affordable Rent

It’s important to find an apartment that has enough space to let you live the life you want—whether that includes weekly dinner parties, regular yoga sessions, or movie marathons with your seven best friends. If your interests require lots of room, finding big apartments with affordable rent can be a challenge. In some areas, it’s a near-impossible task. Luckily, there are cities across the U.S. where you can find spacious rentals that won’t break the bank.

To help make room for your favorite at-home activities, we’ve found nine apartments with more than 1,000 square feet that cost less than their area’s median rent.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

1. Fort Worth, Texas

Median Rent: $1,500/month

Roomy rental near the farmers market

$1,014-$1,227/month

big apartments with affordable rent

Best known for its reputation as “Cowtown,” Fort Worth has far more to offer than cattle drives and cowboy boots—though you’ll find both within city limits. Home to Fortune 500 companies such as Lockheed Martin, American Airlines, and D.R. Horton, the city is bursting with business, Texas charm, and plenty of entertainment. Art aficionados get their Monet and Picasso fix at the Kimbell Art Museum, foodies enjoy a diverse restaurant scene, and rodeo enthusiasts find plenty of cowboy culture at the famous Stockyards. Fort Worth offers big-city amenities with small-town perks (think: easy parking and light traffic), so don’t be surprised if it jumps to the top of your “future hometown” list.

The Oaks at Hulen Bend apartments keep you close to the city without sacrificing closet space. Currently, two-bedroom, two bathroom rentals offer 1,044 square feet and range from $1,014 to $1,227 per month—well below Fort Worth’s median rent. When you and your roomie are ready to stock up on fresh produce, don’t forget to check out the Clearfork Farmers Market, which is just a 10-minute drive away.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

2. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Median rent: $995/month

Pet-friendly apartment in a family-focused neighborhood

$811/month

big apartments with affordable rentThough Oklahoma City has a fast-growing population, it offers plenty of spacious (and affordable) apartments—which means most renters aren’t confined to shoebox-sized studios. If you’re on the hunt for a safe, family-friendly neighborhood with easy access to the city’s amenities, consider Harvest Hills. The proximity to Will Rogers Airport and Interstates 44 and 240 is ideal for frequent travelers, and Seller’s Park—which offers a playground and splash pad for kids—is just a short walk or drive away. And when you’re ready for a grown-up night out, you can still get to Downtown OKC in 15 minutes or less.

Avana 3131 Rentals combine luxury and affordability in this idyllic neighborhood. Here, you can stay under OKC’s median rent and opt for more space with a two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment for $811/month. The 1,083 square-foot rental is an especially good find in the Harvest Hills area, where the median rent jumps to $1,200/month.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

3. Portland, Maine

Median rent: $2,025/month

Bright, furnished apartment in a walkable neighborhood

$1,875/month

big apartments with affordable rentThe most populous city in Maine, Portland is celebrated for its mild summers, breathtaking seascapes, and many historical sites and landmarks. There’s something for everyone in this well-loved city—whether you prefer to spend the day kayaking, shopping, or touring museums and mansions. And in Deering Center, you’ll find a small-town charm within Portland city limits. This walkable neighborhood converges on Stevens Avenue, where local retailers and restaurants provide residents a charming, nearby spot to shop and dine.

If you want to spend more time getting to know the neighborhood and less time in picking out end tables, this furnished two-bedroom condo is the answer. At $1,875 per month, this cheerful rental is under Portland’s median rent—and you’ll have both off-street parking and a five-minute walk to the scenic Capisic Brook Trail.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

4. Denver, Colorado

Median rent: $2,200/month

Modern living near work and play

$1,876/month

big apartments with affordable rentDenver regularly makes it onto lists of the fastest-growing cities in the U.S., and there can be no question as to why. Few places rival Denver’s unique combination of urban attractions, natural beauty, and a bustling business sector. Washington Park West is an ideal spot for professionals looking for a cozy, fun-filled neighborhood with easy access to the Central Business District and Tech Center. Local attractions include the many shops and restaurants on South Pearl Street, and—of course—the lush landscape, lakes, and running trails of Washington Park.

In Denver, it’s rare to find ample space and dual walk-in closets without paying above-average rent. But you can rent this two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment in Washington Park West for $1,876 per month. With plenty of shops, restaurants, and cafes within walking distance, you won’t need a car to have an activity-packed weekend.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

5. San Diego, California

Median Rent: $2,775/month

Stylish space with mountain views

$2,225-$2,250/month

big apartments with affordable rentLet’s face it: San Diego is an easy sell. Known worldwide for its enviable climate and gorgeous beaches, the California city draws in hoards of tourists and new residents each year. San Diego, a master-planned community northeast of downtown, keeps everything at your fingertips. Bordered by mountains, canyons, and Lake Hodges, this neighborhood offers locals plenty of opportunities to get active. Of course, if wining and dining is more your speed, look no further than the Bernardo Winery and the Rancho Bernardo Inn.

With its long list of accolades, it’s natural that San Diego isn’t known for big apartments with affordable rent. Still, spacious deals exist, such as this two-bedroom, two-bathroom rental at La Serena. For $525 under the city’s median rent, enjoy upscale amenities, mountain views, and the convenience of living in Rancho Bernardo.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

6. Los Angeles, California

Median Rent: $4,150/month

Upscale amenities in West L.A.

$2,975/month

big apartments with affordable rentBesides the hope of a chance encounter with Ryan Gosling, plenty of factors contribute to L.A.’s residential appeal. Los Angeles is known for its diverse population, and this large-scale cultural exchange helps the city offer the very best in food, entertainment, and the arts. This is especially true in the San Diego area—a diverse, youthful neighborhood 20 minutes outside of downtown. Just five miles from UCLA’s campus and neighboring Culver City, this area is a great spot for commuters and offers a hometown feel in a city that can be a bit overwhelming to navigate.

For well below the city’s median rent, The Woodcliff offers a two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment for $2,975 per month. Coming in at 1,250 square feet, this rental is one of the largest on our list and a great find in the Palms. When you aren’t sampling the fresh-as-can-be pizza at The Doughroom, enjoy having access to an upscale pool, fitness center, and yoga studio—right at home.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

7. Knoxville, Tennessee

Median rent: $1,200/month

Upscale apartment community close to downtown

$970/month

big apartments with affordable rentHome to the University of Tennessee and less than an hour’s drive from the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Knoxville offers a blend of culture, comfort, and the great outdoors. Runners and bikers enjoy the many trails and greenways, and water-sports lovers flock to parks along the Tennessee River. When you’re ready for a fun night out, head over to Market Square to experience some of the city’s best restaurants. One favorite is Tupelo Honey, a “Southern comfort” joint that serves modern dishes, craft beers, and cocktails.

With so much to enjoy in Knoxville, you’ll want to stay close to the action. Fortunately, Evergreen at the Bluffs is just a ten-minute drive from Market Square. For $970 per month, you can lock down a two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment in this top-notch residence.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

8. Las Vegas, Nevada

Median rent: $1,395/month

Resort oasis near the Las Vegas Strip

$1,221/month

big apartments with affordable rent

Las Vegas has earned its reputation as the unofficial capital of gambling, shopping, shows, and entertainment in the U.S. But if you live in Vegas, you’re going want to sleep sometimes, which is why the Canyon Gate neighborhood is a smart choice for renters. Located within walking distance of two parks (Firefighters Memorial and Rainbow Family) and 25 minutes outside of Red Rock Canyon, this neighborhood is ideal for someone who wants to stay close to the action—while still getting some much-needed fresh air.

Just 20 minutes away from the Strip, Sahara West is a sprawling apartment community offering plenty of its own entertainment. Currently, a three-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment goes for $1,221 per month. If you’re more interested in baked goods than blackjack, pop over to Is Sweet and ask for the famous honey toast. You won’t regret it.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

9. Phoenix, Arizona

Median rent: $1,395/month

Laid-back luxury surrounded by natural beauty

$1,061/month

big apartments with affordable rentListed as one of the fastest-growing U.S. cities of 2017, Phoenix is known for its year-round sunshine. It’s a dream city for people with active lifestyles, offering everything from hiking and mountain climbing to bike trails and water parks. For those living in the North Mountain neighborhood, this couldn’t be truer. As the name suggests, the area borders North Mountain Park—a part of the Phoenix Mountain Preserve with hiking trails of all lengths and intensities. When you’ve finished your trek, head over to Scramble for a well-deserved brunch.

Set along the North Mountain Preserve, Avana at the Pointe is the ideal spot for outdoor lovers looking for quick access to hiking and biking trails. At the moment, it’s also a great place to score a two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment for less than the city’s median rent. Once you’ve moved into your 1,105-square-foot rental, settle down by the pool and take in the sweeping mountain views.

Originally published November 27, 2017; updated January 30, 2018.

Looking for a spacious apartment you can afford? Start your search right here on Trulia.

The post 9 Cities That Have Big Apartments with Affordable Rent appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

Cities That Have Big Apartments With Affordable Rent

It’s important to find an apartment that has enough space to let you live the life you want—whether that includes weekly dinner parties, regular yoga sessions, or movie marathons with your seven best friends. If your interests require lots of room, finding big apartments with affordable rent can be a challenge. In some areas, it’s a near-impossible task. Luckily, there are cities across the U.S. where you can find spacious rentals that won’t break the bank.

To help make room for your favorite at-home activities, we’ve found nine apartments with more than 1,000 square feet that cost less than their area’s median rent.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

1. Fort Worth, Texas

Median Rent: $1,500/month

Roomy rental near the farmers market

$1,014-$1,227/month

big apartments with affordable rent

Best known for its reputation as “Cowtown,” Fort Worth has far more to offer than cattle drives and cowboy boots—though you’ll find both within city limits. Home to Fortune 500 companies such as Lockheed Martin, American Airlines, and D.R. Horton, the city is bursting with business, Texas charm, and plenty of entertainment. Art aficionados get their Monet and Picasso fix at the Kimbell Art Museum, foodies enjoy a diverse restaurant scene, and rodeo enthusiasts find plenty of cowboy culture at the famous Stockyards. Fort Worth offers big-city amenities with small-town perks (think: easy parking and light traffic), so don’t be surprised if it jumps to the top of your “future hometown” list.

The Oaks at Hulen Bend apartments keep you close to the city without sacrificing closet space. Currently, two-bedroom, two bathroom rentals offer 1,044 square feet and range from $1,014 to $1,227 per month—well below Fort Worth’s median rent. When you and your roomie are ready to stock up on fresh produce, don’t forget to check out the Clearfork Farmers Market, which is just a 10-minute drive away.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

2. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Median rent: $995/month

Pet-friendly apartment in a family-focused neighborhood

$811/month

big apartments with affordable rentThough Oklahoma City has a fast-growing population, it offers plenty of spacious (and affordable) apartments—which means most renters aren’t confined to shoebox-sized studios. If you’re on the hunt for a safe, family-friendly neighborhood with easy access to the city’s amenities, consider Harvest Hills. The proximity to Will Rogers Airport and Interstates 44 and 240 is ideal for frequent travelers, and Seller’s Park—which offers a playground and splash pad for kids—is just a short walk or drive away. And when you’re ready for a grown-up night out, you can still get to Downtown OKC in 15 minutes or less.

Avana 3131 Rentals combine luxury and affordability in this idyllic neighborhood. Here, you can stay under OKC’s median rent and opt for more space with a two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment for $811/month. The 1,083 square-foot rental is an especially good find in the Harvest Hills area, where the median rent jumps to $1,200/month.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

3. Portland, Maine

Median rent: $2,025/month

Bright, furnished apartment in a walkable neighborhood

$1,875/month

big apartments with affordable rentThe most populous city in Maine, Portland is celebrated for its mild summers, breathtaking seascapes, and many historical sites and landmarks. There’s something for everyone in this well-loved city—whether you prefer to spend the day kayaking, shopping, or touring museums and mansions. And in Deering Center, you’ll find a small-town charm within Portland city limits. This walkable neighborhood converges on Stevens Avenue, where local retailers and restaurants provide residents a charming, nearby spot to shop and dine.

If you want to spend more time getting to know the neighborhood and less time in picking out end tables, this furnished two-bedroom condo is the answer. At $1,875 per month, this cheerful rental is under Portland’s median rent—and you’ll have both off-street parking and a five-minute walk to the scenic Capisic Brook Trail.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

4. Denver, Colorado

Median rent: $2,200/month

Modern living near work and play

$1,876/month

big apartments with affordable rentDenver regularly makes it onto lists of the fastest-growing cities in the U.S., and there can be no question as to why. Few places rival Denver’s unique combination of urban attractions, natural beauty, and a bustling business sector. Washington Park West is an ideal spot for professionals looking for a cozy, fun-filled neighborhood with easy access to the Central Business District and Tech Center. Local attractions include the many shops and restaurants on South Pearl Street, and—of course—the lush landscape, lakes, and running trails of Washington Park.

In Denver, it’s rare to find ample space and dual walk-in closets without paying above-average rent. But you can rent this two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment in Washington Park West for $1,876 per month. With plenty of shops, restaurants, and cafes within walking distance, you won’t need a car to have an activity-packed weekend.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

5. San Diego, California

Median Rent: $2,775/month

Stylish space with mountain views

$2,225-$2,250/month

big apartments with affordable rentLet’s face it: San Diego is an easy sell. Known worldwide for its enviable climate and gorgeous beaches, the California city draws in hoards of tourists and new residents each year. San Diego, a master-planned community northeast of downtown, keeps everything at your fingertips. Bordered by mountains, canyons, and Lake Hodges, this neighborhood offers locals plenty of opportunities to get active. Of course, if wining and dining is more your speed, look no further than the Bernardo Winery and the Rancho Bernardo Inn.

With its long list of accolades, it’s natural that San Diego isn’t known for big apartments with affordable rent. Still, spacious deals exist, such as this two-bedroom, two-bathroom rental at La Serena. For $525 under the city’s median rent, enjoy upscale amenities, mountain views, and the convenience of living in Rancho Bernardo.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

6. Los Angeles, California

Median Rent: $4,150/month

Upscale amenities in West L.A.

$2,975/month

big apartments with affordable rentBesides the hope of a chance encounter with Ryan Gosling, plenty of factors contribute to L.A.’s residential appeal. Los Angeles is known for its diverse population, and this large-scale cultural exchange helps the city offer the very best in food, entertainment, and the arts. This is especially true in the San Diego area—a diverse, youthful neighborhood 20 minutes outside of downtown. Just five miles from UCLA’s campus and neighboring Culver City, this area is a great spot for commuters and offers a hometown feel in a city that can be a bit overwhelming to navigate.

For well below the city’s median rent, The Woodcliff offers a two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment for $2,975 per month. Coming in at 1,250 square feet, this rental is one of the largest on our list and a great find in the Palms. When you aren’t sampling the fresh-as-can-be pizza at The Doughroom, enjoy having access to an upscale pool, fitness center, and yoga studio—right at home.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

7. Knoxville, Tennessee

Median rent: $1,200/month

Upscale apartment community close to downtown

$970/month

big apartments with affordable rentHome to the University of Tennessee and less than an hour’s drive from the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Knoxville offers a blend of culture, comfort, and the great outdoors. Runners and bikers enjoy the many trails and greenways, and water-sports lovers flock to parks along the Tennessee River. When you’re ready for a fun night out, head over to Market Square to experience some of the city’s best restaurants. One favorite is Tupelo Honey, a “Southern comfort” joint that serves modern dishes, craft beers, and cocktails.

With so much to enjoy in Knoxville, you’ll want to stay close to the action. Fortunately, Evergreen at the Bluffs is just a ten-minute drive from Market Square. For $970 per month, you can lock down a two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment in this top-notch residence.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

8. Las Vegas, Nevada

Median rent: $1,395/month

Resort oasis near the Las Vegas Strip

$1,221/month

big apartments with affordable rent

Las Vegas has earned its reputation as the unofficial capital of gambling, shopping, shows, and entertainment in the U.S. But if you live in Vegas, you’re going want to sleep sometimes, which is why the Canyon Gate neighborhood is a smart choice for renters. Located within walking distance of two parks (Firefighters Memorial and Rainbow Family) and 25 minutes outside of Red Rock Canyon, this neighborhood is ideal for someone who wants to stay close to the action—while still getting some much-needed fresh air.

Just 20 minutes away from the Strip, Sahara West is a sprawling apartment community offering plenty of its own entertainment. Currently, a three-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment goes for $1,221 per month. If you’re more interested in baked goods than blackjack, pop over to Is Sweet and ask for the famous honey toast. You won’t regret it.

 

big apartments with affordable rent

9. Phoenix, Arizona

Median rent: $1,395/month

Laid-back luxury surrounded by natural beauty

$1,061/month

big apartments with affordable rentListed as one of the fastest-growing U.S. cities of 2017, Phoenix is known for its year-round sunshine. It’s a dream city for people with active lifestyles, offering everything from hiking and mountain climbing to bike trails and water parks. For those living in the North Mountain neighborhood, this couldn’t be truer. As the name suggests, the area borders North Mountain Park—a part of the Phoenix Mountain Preserve with hiking trails of all lengths and intensities. When you’ve finished your trek, head over to Scramble for a well-deserved brunch.

Set along the North Mountain Preserve, Avana at the Pointe is the ideal spot for outdoor lovers looking for quick access to hiking and biking trails. At the moment, it’s also a great place to score a two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment for less than the city’s median rent. Once you’ve moved into your 1,105-square-foot rental, settle down by the pool and take in the sweeping mountain views.

Originally published November 27, 2017; updated January 30, 2018.

Looking for a spacious apartment you can afford? Start your search right here on Trulia.

The post Cities That Have Big Apartments With Affordable Rent appeared first on Trulia's Blog.