The Place Generation

Place matters to young adults. So much so that they are building their lives around the cities and neighborhoods where they want to live—not where they need to live for a job. In fact, just 11.9 percent of millennials cite a new position or a work transfer as their reason for a move.

What draws them to their ideal city? Our data show that for millennial homeowners, what’s happening outside their door—like shopping, dining, and community events—factors into their home-buying decisions more than the older generations.

Moving to a city for the lifestyle it offers and building a life and career around it requires a little bit of guts and certain amount of strategy. Here are five people who did it—and how they pulled it off.


Tara Mackay

Los Angeles, California

What Tara Mackey did seven years ago—quitting a prestigious job at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City to drive cross-country to California with no job and $300 in her pocket—might sound unwise at best. But, Mackey, 31, had chronic health problems for which she was taking a staggering 14 prescription medications a day. The sunny Los Angeles lifestyle called to her.

“I wanted to learn about alternative therapies, from herbs to Ayurveda, and to study yoga and meditation,” she says, “and California seemed like the perfect place to do just that.”

Quickly, Tara was able to find holistic solutions to treat her illnesses, is now prescription-free, and has since started a wildly popular blog, The Organic Life. She’s also written two best-selling natural-healing books and launched a skincare line—all of which she attributes to wisdom she’s gained in her adopted home.

“It was so much better here than what I was expecting,” Tara says. “Imagine feeling sick for 25 years, and then finally finding a solution and regaining your health? Every single day I wake up and it is sunny and beautiful—I get up, I take the pups on a hike, do interviews, email, write. I am such a hippie, and it suits me here.”


Taylor Griffin

Bushwick, New York

A native of California, Taylor Griffin went to college and lived for a few years post-graduation in the Pacific Northwest. But it just wasn’t the right fit for him. “I had long been thinking about NYC as a dream—and I was 25, and I thought, if I didn’t do it now, I never will.”

He did it—with a duffle bag in tow, and with the help of friends who shared their couches while he found a place. Why was the move worth it? New York City’s active comedy scene. “Improv is my jam—basically my whole social scene is based on people I’ve met at UCB [Upright Citizen’s Brigade] classes,” Taylor says.

By day, Taylor is an Apple store manager in Manhattan. The job covers his bills in an apartment that he shares with two roommates in the popular Brooklyn neighborhood of Bushwick, which offers the fast-paced, access-to-everything, NYC lifestyle he wanted

“Hands down, my favorite part of living in New York is that there is always something to do,” Taylor says. “You could live here a lifetime and still discover new things to do, see, eat, smell, sit on, fall in love with, get mad at, wait in line for. It’s an entire world just a $2.75 metro fare away.”

Taylor’s big move and the pursuit of his craft are paying off in the city he has come to love, as he is now working on a comedic web series with his improv friends.


Ni’kesia Pannell

Atlanta, Georgia

Now 30, Ni’kesia Pannell grew up in Orlando, Florida where she got her Master’s degree in creative writing for entertainment. But Pannell set her sights on a place bigger than her hometown. At nearly twice the population, and with energy and culture to spare, Atlanta would be the perfect city for an entertainment-loving, style-conscious creative like herself.

“I called my mom to tell her I was moving, and she said, ‘What part of Orlando?’ She didn’t really believe me,” Ni’kesia says. She moved to the Northlake section of Atlanta in 2013, and she found her apartment—remotely from Orlando—by searching online and having a trusted friend go to check out apartments. However, despite her prestigious degree, once she got to Atlanta, finding a job wasn’t as easy as she’d imagined.

After bouncing from gig to gig for three years, she realized writing about her Atlanta lifestyle—music, relationship, and her faith included—was her passion. “I started my blog in 2014, and it changed everything for me,” she says. Soon after, she was in New York for Fashion Week and arranged a meeting with an editor at Essence. Now, she’s the magazine’s food and travel columnist.

“I love the culture in Atlanta—you can’t get any of this, from music and fashion, anywhere else,” says Ni’kesia. “I go to a little spot called Cinco, just down the street from my apartment,” she says of her favorite restaurant. “I go there every Friday, and bring everyone who visits from out of town.” Today, Ni’Kesia lives in Marietta, which is five minutes outside of Atlanta proper. “My neighborhood is bustling,” says Ni’kesia, “I’m just a few minutes from Cumberland Mall and The Battery, where the spectacular new Braves stadium and lifestyle plaza has been built.”

Atlanta has even found its way into her professional work—Marietta Square in particular. “[It’s] where I go a lot to do photo shoots. It’s a little quieter, there are great little antique shops and record stores, and it’s a perfect place to grab a bite to eat.”


Alana Esposito

New York City, New York

Alana Esposito has lived plenty of places—including Greece and Paris—and has had plenty of jobs, from art-gallery administrator to freelance writer. But her heart has always been in the Big Apple.

“I grew up in Providence, Rhode Island, but my mom was from New York City,” says 33-year-old Alana. “I grew up visiting relatives in the city, and my whole life I knew I would eventually end up here.”

In 2015, she finally moved there. After a long apartment search, she ended up in a studio south of the West Village and north of Tribeca with an amazing rooftop.

“What I love about the city is that people feel free to be whoever they are, and, despite everyone seeming to be too busy to care about their fellow New Yorkers, people here do pull through for each other in dark times such as by volunteering to clean up and rebuild after Sandy,” Alana says.

She now owns an apartment on the border of Chinatown and the Lower East Side—it is a vibrant and culturally diverse area with global restaurants and magical little community gardens between the buildings.

Career-wise, Alana returned to her original field of study, international relations. “I work at a non-profit that is focused on the well-being of women around the world. Because of the time difference, I am sometimes on calls from 11 p.m. to 2:30 a.m., but that’s New York, and the subway’s always running and hailing a taxi is easy!”


Kate Brannen

Washington, D.C.

Just 25, Kate Brannen graduated from the University of Oklahoma with a dual major in PR and women’s representation in the media. She moved to Washington, D.C., soon after she got her degree, without any job prospects and not knowing a soul in the city, and ended up in the Vienna, Virginia area of Metro D.C. “It was super convenient because it was right across from the metro station and above a grocery store, and just a few blocks from the Mosaic District which has great restaurants, a movie theater, and shopping,” Kate says. From the beginning, she just knew D.C.’s career-focused, breakneck vibe was for her.

Brannen now lives in Arlington, Virginia‘s Courthouse neighborhood. “I love it,” she says. “People here work hard and play hard. Patios and rooftop happy hours are a way of staying sane. For me, it’s meeting friends in Clarendon for Wednesday night bingo, grabbing a drink at Courthaus Social or canceling out any workout with Fireworks Pizza.”

Sure enough, she eventually found just the kind of job she was hoping D.C. would have for her. “I started researching influencers online, and one posted a job,” Kate says. Her PR company does crisis counseling and marketing. Her favorite part of the job is the clients. “So many of them are involved in great philanthropy,” she says. “We work with the Olympics, we do a lot of pro-bono work, and that feels great.”

And the D.C. lifestyle is everything she imagined. “Living in Oklahoma, I had to drive everywhere, but here everything is so accessible,” Kate says. “I love that I can walk to work, jump on the metro for a short ride into D.C., and bike or run the miles and miles of beautiful trails that connect Virginia, D.C., and Maryland.”

How These Movers Made It Work

“Give yourself a good plan. Do your finances and stick to your home-buying goals.”

– TARA MACKEY

 

“Use every single network that you have—you never know who may have a friend or a relative with a place right where you want to be.”

– KATE BRANNEN

“Everyone gets happiness from different things. Pick something you have can control over. Things you can’t control? Relationships and jobs. Find something you are passionate about and focus on that.”

– TAYLOR GRIFFEN

“If you’ve moved to a new and unfamiliar place, and you’re supposed to be there, it will happen for you. Don’t let anyone, your family or friends, talk you out of your dreams.”

– NI’KESIA PANNELL

Want to make your big move?

Start Searching

The post The Place Generation appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

The Place Generation

Place matters to young adults. So much so that they are building their lives around the cities and neighborhoods where they want to live—not where they need to live for a job. In fact, just 11.9 percent of millennials cite a new position or a work transfer as their reason for a move.

What draws them to their ideal city? Our data show that for millennial homeowners, what’s happening outside their door—like shopping, dining, and community events—factors into their home-buying decisions more than the older generations.

Moving to a city for the lifestyle it offers and building a life and career around it requires a little bit of guts and certain amount of strategy. Here are five people who did it—and how they pulled it off.


Tara Mackay

Los Angeles, California

What Tara Mackey did seven years ago—quitting a prestigious job at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City to drive cross-country to California with no job and $300 in her pocket—might sound unwise at best. But, Mackey, 31, had chronic health problems for which she was taking a staggering 14 prescription medications a day. The sunny Los Angeles lifestyle called to her.

“I wanted to learn about alternative therapies, from herbs to Ayurveda, and to study yoga and meditation,” she says, “and California seemed like the perfect place to do just that.”

Quickly, Tara was able to find holistic solutions to treat her illnesses, is now prescription-free, and has since started a wildly popular blog, The Organic Life. She’s also written two best-selling natural-healing books and launched a skincare line—all of which she attributes to wisdom she’s gained in her adopted home.

“It was so much better here than what I was expecting,” Tara says. “Imagine feeling sick for 25 years, and then finally finding a solution and regaining your health? Every single day I wake up and it is sunny and beautiful—I get up, I take the pups on a hike, do interviews, email, write. I am such a hippie, and it suits me here.”


Taylor Griffin

Bushwick, New York

A native of California, Taylor Griffin went to college and lived for a few years post-graduation in the Pacific Northwest. But it just wasn’t the right fit for him. “I had long been thinking about NYC as a dream—and I was 25, and I thought, if I didn’t do it now, I never will.”

He did it—with a duffle bag in tow, and with the help of friends who shared their couches while he found a place. Why was the move worth it? New York City’s active comedy scene. “Improv is my jam—basically my whole social scene is based on people I’ve met at UCB [Upright Citizen’s Brigade] classes,” Taylor says.

By day, Taylor is an Apple store manager in Manhattan. The job covers his bills in an apartment that he shares with two roommates in the popular Brooklyn neighborhood of Bushwick, which offers the fast-paced, access-to-everything, NYC lifestyle he wanted

“Hands down, my favorite part of living in New York is that there is always something to do,” Taylor says. “You could live here a lifetime and still discover new things to do, see, eat, smell, sit on, fall in love with, get mad at, wait in line for. It’s an entire world just a $2.75 metro fare away.”

Taylor’s big move and the pursuit of his craft are paying off in the city he has come to love, as he is now working on a comedic web series with his improv friends.


Ni’kesia Pannell

Atlanta, Georgia

Now 30, Ni’kesia Pannell grew up in Orlando, Florida where she got her Master’s degree in creative writing for entertainment. But Pannell set her sights on a place bigger than her hometown. At nearly twice the population, and with energy and culture to spare, Atlanta would be the perfect city for an entertainment-loving, style-conscious creative like herself.

“I called my mom to tell her I was moving, and she said, ‘What part of Orlando?’ She didn’t really believe me,” Ni’kesia says. She moved to the Northlake section of Atlanta in 2013, and she found her apartment—remotely from Orlando—by searching online and having a trusted friend go to check out apartments. However, despite her prestigious degree, once she got to Atlanta, finding a job wasn’t as easy as she’d imagined.

After bouncing from gig to gig for three years, she realized writing about her Atlanta lifestyle—music, relationship, and her faith included—was her passion. “I started my blog in 2014, and it changed everything for me,” she says. Soon after, she was in New York for Fashion Week and arranged a meeting with an editor at Essence. Now, she’s the magazine’s food and travel columnist.

“I love the culture in Atlanta—you can’t get any of this, from music and fashion, anywhere else,” says Ni’kesia. “I go to a little spot called Cinco, just down the street from my apartment,” she says of her favorite restaurant. “I go there every Friday, and bring everyone who visits from out of town.” Today, Ni’Kesia lives in Marietta, which is five minutes outside of Atlanta proper. “My neighborhood is bustling,” says Ni’kesia, “I’m just a few minutes from Cumberland Mall and The Battery, where the spectacular new Braves stadium and lifestyle plaza has been built.”

Atlanta has even found its way into her professional work—Marietta Square in particular. “[It’s] where I go a lot to do photo shoots. It’s a little quieter, there are great little antique shops and record stores, and it’s a perfect place to grab a bite to eat.”


Alana Esposito

New York City, New York

Alana Esposito has lived plenty of places—including Greece and Paris—and has had plenty of jobs, from art-gallery administrator to freelance writer. But her heart has always been in the Big Apple.

“I grew up in Providence, Rhode Island, but my mom was from New York City,” says 33-year-old Alana. “I grew up visiting relatives in the city, and my whole life I knew I would eventually end up here.”

In 2015, she finally moved there. After a long apartment search, she ended up in a studio south of the West Village and north of Tribeca with an amazing rooftop.

“What I love about the city is that people feel free to be whoever they are, and, despite everyone seeming to be too busy to care about their fellow New Yorkers, people here do pull through for each other in dark times such as by volunteering to clean up and rebuild after Sandy,” Alana says.

She now owns an apartment on the border of Chinatown and the Lower East Side—it is a vibrant and culturally diverse area with global restaurants and magical little community gardens between the buildings.

Career-wise, Alana returned to her original field of study, international relations. “I work at a non-profit that is focused on the well-being of women around the world. Because of the time difference, I am sometimes on calls from 11 p.m. to 2:30 a.m., but that’s New York, and the subway’s always running and hailing a taxi is easy!”


Kate Brannen

Washington, D.C.

Just 25, Kate Brannen graduated from the University of Oklahoma with a dual major in PR and women’s representation in the media. She moved to Washington, D.C., soon after she got her degree, without any job prospects and not knowing a soul in the city, and ended up in the Vienna, Virginia area of Metro D.C. “It was super convenient because it was right across from the metro station and above a grocery store, and just a few blocks from the Mosaic District which has great restaurants, a movie theater, and shopping,” Kate says. From the beginning, she just knew D.C.’s career-focused, breakneck vibe was for her.

Brannen now lives in Arlington, Virginia‘s Courthouse neighborhood. “I love it,” she says. “People here work hard and play hard. Patios and rooftop happy hours are a way of staying sane. For me, it’s meeting friends in Clarendon for Wednesday night bingo, grabbing a drink at Courthaus Social or canceling out any workout with Fireworks Pizza.”

Sure enough, she eventually found just the kind of job she was hoping D.C. would have for her. “I started researching influencers online, and one posted a job,” Kate says. Her PR company does crisis counseling and marketing. Her favorite part of the job is the clients. “So many of them are involved in great philanthropy,” she says. “We work with the Olympics, we do a lot of pro-bono work, and that feels great.”

And the D.C. lifestyle is everything she imagined. “Living in Oklahoma, I had to drive everywhere, but here everything is so accessible,” Kate says. “I love that I can walk to work, jump on the metro for a short ride into D.C., and bike or run the miles and miles of beautiful trails that connect Virginia, D.C., and Maryland.”

How These Movers Made It Work

“Give yourself a good plan. Do your finances and stick to your home-buying goals.”

– TARA MACKEY

 

“Use every single network that you have—you never know who may have a friend or a relative with a place right where you want to be.”

– KATE BRANNEN

“Everyone gets happiness from different things. Pick something you have can control over. Things you can’t control? Relationships and jobs. Find something you are passionate about and focus on that.”

– TAYLOR GRIFFEN

“If you’ve moved to a new and unfamiliar place, and you’re supposed to be there, it will happen for you. Don’t let anyone, your family or friends, talk you out of your dreams.”

– NI’KESIA PANNELL

Want to make your big move?

Start Searching

The post The Place Generation appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

The Most Popular Lakeside Towns You Never Knew Existed

If you’ve been dreaming of dangling your feet off a dock with the sun warming your shoulders, there’s nowhere better to do it than at your own lake house. These charming lakeside towns are among the most searched on Trulia—and they all have lake homes for sale, meaning they could make your second-home dreams become a sunshine-filled reality.

Can’t you just imagine zipping into this little town in your flipflops for fireworks and popsicles? See available homes here.

Rome City, Indiana

A Midwestern lake town for nature lovers.

Indiana doesn’t share the same summer-destination reputation as its Great Lakes neighbors, but Rome City has Midwestern-getaway vibes to spare. Located on the inland Sylvan Lake in northeast Indiana (less than an hour from Fort Wayne), Rome City both offers outdoorsy activities and celebrates outdoorsy culture with the Gene Stratton-Porter State Museum and Historic site. This preserved home of Indiana’s most famous female conservationist, photographer, and author hosts workshops, cookouts, and outdoor music events all summer.

Sixteen miles of shoreline give Rome City residents room for waterskiing, fishing, or kayaking at home as well. There are plenty of cottages, farmhouses, ranch-style, and Colonial houses available both on and just off the water, and you can find some deals. You could build custom on a $10,000 lot or get a 1,600-square-foot three-bedroom on the water for $269,000.

Henrico, North Carolina

A rural setting for families, retirees, and Sasquatch, too.

There are few things as relaxing as sitting barefoot by the lake with a glass of sweet tea. And in the area around Henrico, North Carolina—a rural hamlet on Lake Gastonsecond-homebuyers are sure to find plenty of places to lift their glasses.

Lake Gaston spans five counties between northeastern North Carolina and southeastern Virginia and includes communities like Henrico, Littleton and Roanoke Rapids. While the towns themselves are small, there are around 150,000 retirees, families, and tourists who call the Lake Gaston area home.

Greet you summer neighbors over a BBQ lunch at Grandpa’s Kitchen or take a selfie with Bigfoot at the Cryptozoology & Paranormal Museum in Littleton, just a few minutes’ drive down the road. Henrico’s charm comes from its mix of residents—and its variety of homes, ranging from a large lakeside cottage on the waterfront for $499,900 to a 700-square-foot fisherman’s cabin for $112,000.

 

In Kimberling City, you can spend the afternoon on the lake and catch an evening concert in the city. See available homes here.

Kimberling City, Missouri

A hidden retreat just minutes from Branson.

For those who love the idea of a hidden lakeside retreat but don’t want to be too far from the bright lights of the city, try Kimberling City, Missouri. This town of 2,400, located on crystal-clear Table Rock Lake in the Ozark mountains, is just a 35-minute drive from Branson, Missouri, one of America’s favorite vacation hubs.

Ski-Doo riders can catch a wake in the morning and hop aboard the Time Traveler, the world’s fastest, steepest and tallest coaster at Silver Dollar City in the afternoon. By evening, theater lovers can take in 76 Country Boulevard, Branson’s main-street district— and still make it home by nightfall to watch the nightly theater: sunset from the dock.

Try a lakeside condo for $160,000 or enjoy the lake breezes and mountain views from a large, family home in the hills above the water.

 

Longville, Minnesota

An unspoiled resort nestled between the lakes.

Paddle a kayak into the quiet, misty waters at dawn or draw in a breath of the pure, fresh air in Longville, Minnesota, an unspoiled resort roughly four hours north of the Twin Cities.

Bounded by Leech Lake to the north, Hackensack to the west and Remer to the east, Longville is a quiet, uncrowded area where you can enjoy some of the best water recreation in the state. Campers love the area for the pristine woods, and kids of all ages join up for the weekly Turtle Races, held Wednesdays from June to August.

Homes reflect the natural beauty. With their abundance of wood and glass, structures like this $280,000 log cabin fit seamlessly into the landscape.

south haven, minnesota

Quintessential small-town America awaits in the itty-bitty lakeside community of South Haven. See available homes here.

South Haven, Minnesota

An ideal location for those who crave the quiet life.

The 192-resident town of South Haven is in Minnesota, about 20 miles south of St. Cloud. Surrounded by 26 lakes, all within a 10-mile radius, it’s an ideal spot for people looking for a quiet summer on the water.

Anglers target South Haven to cast their rods, especially Clearwater Lake (the largest in the area), which is abundantly stocked with bass, pike, walleye, bluegill, and crappie. But life in the super-small town isn’t antisocial. There are a couple of places to grab a hot meal in town—Mom’s Place and Bedrock Bar and Grill—and on summer Saturdays, you can put down the pole and visit the huge and busy Swappers Meet, a combination garage sale, antique store, and farmer’s market.

You can find a lakeside home in South Haven on a wooded lot for the mid-$300s or a rambler-style house at the water’s edge for $200,000.

nebagamon, Wisconsin

From summer parades to sunsets that’ll melt your heart, Lake Nebagamon is a summer-lover’s dream. See available homes here.

Lake Nebagamon, Wisconsin

A vacation spot that’s a slice of pure Americana.

Find a slice of pure Americana at Lake Nebagamon, Wisconsin. This lakeside village at Wisconsin’s northwestern tip (about 175 miles north of the Twin Cities), takes people from their harried daily lives and drops them into to a simpler time.

Here, you can enjoy melting ice cream cones, 4th of July boat parades and hikes with the family. And in the winter, cozy up to the fire with hot chocolate and marshmallows after a day of snowmobiling and ice sports.

The fireworks over the lake would be breathtaking from a historic home in the $150,00 range or choose a lakeside paradise, a modern luxury home with its own dock, for $749,000.

Graford, Texas

A premier resort in the heart of Texas.

Located about 60 miles west of Fort Worth, Graford is one of Texas’ premier resorts. Spa-goers can rejuvenate at one of its lavish hotels and spas, like the Lush Resort, a lakeside hotel with hammock-like lounges that invite napping.

Or for those who crave adventure over downtime, there’s the challenge of scuba diving or trail running in the hills above Possum Kingdom Lake, a waterway known for its breathtaking views and over 300 miles of shoreline.

If lake-house living, Texas style, is making your boots scoot, try an 800 sq ft vacation condo — or a multi-million dollar custom homes built right into the lake’s cliffs.

Deerwood, Minnesota

A year-round destination for fishing enthusiasts.
You know you’ve found Deerwood, Minnesota, when you see the Leaping Deer in Elmer Park, at the site of the old Deerwood Railroad Depot. Located 125 miles north of the Twin Cities, this tiny city fronts on Serpent Lake, a clear, fresh waterway with nine miles of shoreline.

More than 250 homes and cabins cling to the meandering lakeside, sheltered by towering birch, pine and oak forests. Campers and hikers take in the clear air and clearer water, while the kids work off their animal spirits at Traditions, a family fun center with mini golf, water wars and frozen yogurt.

Like nearby Clearwater Lake (about 100 miles south), Serpent Lake is home to many fish species, and hosts fishing tournaments like Bassmaster and an annual ice fishing competition, making it another year-round destination for anglers.

See how much it costs to live in:


METHODOLOGY: These locations represent 10 of the top 20 searched zip codes identified as lake house vacation home areas on Trulia. Lake house vacation home areas were identified as those where at least 25 percent of homes listed on Trulia are vacation homes.

Ready to start your summer home search? See what’s available, here on Trulia.

The post The Most Popular Lakeside Towns You Never Knew Existed appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

Cindy Crawford And Rande Gerber Sell Their Malibu Home For $45M

Cindy Crawford and Rande Gerber are going strong. The world-famous supermodel and her entrepreneur husband just sold their four-bed, six-bath home in Malibu for a whopping $45 million. Technically it’s a loss for the duo, who bought the home for $50.5 million back in 2015 and intended to sell it at a profit after renovations. But we’re guessing they aren’t shedding any tears over this flop of a house flip!

Measuring 5254 square feet, this one-of-a-kind beach compound is set on three natural acres filled with mature trees, panoramic ocean views, and winding walkways to the sandy beach. Guests enter through the long driveway, which winds past a tennis court to the newly-renovated, architectural-style home, which was originally built in 1944. On the main floor, a great room with floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors provides panoramic views of Malibu’s sparkling beaches and ocean. A large kitchen with a breakfast bar and spacious island is the dream of any aspiring chef. The master suite is like a vacation in itself, thanks to a cozy fireplace, sitting area, two separate spa-like baths and roomy dressing closets. An additional room with beautiful ocean views currently functions as a media room, but could easily be converted into a home office or additional bedroom.

Just last year, the couple dropped $11.625 million on a sprawling estate in Beverly Hills. That home, which is located inside the coveted Trousdale Estates, was purchased from One Republic singer Ryan Tedder. The couple also owns two other properties in Malibu, including a beach house that can be yours for the low, low price of $19,500 a month.  Then there’s their property in Los Cabos, Mexico and a lake house near Ontario, Canada, because hey, everyone’s got to have options.

 

The post Cindy Crawford And Rande Gerber Sell Their Malibu Home For $45M appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

Cindy Crawford And Rande Gerber Sell Their Malibu Home For $45M

Cindy Crawford and Rande Gerber are going strong. The world-famous supermodel and her entrepreneur husband just sold their four-bed, six-bath home in Malibu for a whopping $45 million. Technically it’s a loss for the duo, who bought the home for $50.5 million back in 2015 and intended to sell it at a profit after renovations. But we’re guessing they aren’t shedding any tears over this flop of a house flip!

Measuring 5254 square feet, this one-of-a-kind beach compound is set on three natural acres filled with mature trees, panoramic ocean views, and winding walkways to the sandy beach. Guests enter through the long driveway, which winds past a tennis court to the newly-renovated, architectural-style home, which was originally built in 1944. On the main floor, a great room with floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors provides panoramic views of Malibu’s sparkling beaches and ocean. A large kitchen with a breakfast bar and spacious island is the dream of any aspiring chef. The master suite is like a vacation in itself, thanks to a cozy fireplace, sitting area, two separate spa-like baths and roomy dressing closets. An additional room with beautiful ocean views currently functions as a media room, but could easily be converted into a home office or additional bedroom.

Just last year, the couple dropped $11.625 million on a sprawling estate in Beverly Hills. That home, which is located inside the coveted Trousdale Estates, was purchased from One Republic singer Ryan Tedder. The couple also owns two other properties in Malibu, including a beach house that can be yours for the low, low price of $19,500 a month.  Then there’s their property in Los Cabos, Mexico and a lake house near Ontario, Canada, because hey, everyone’s got to have options.

 

The post Cindy Crawford And Rande Gerber Sell Their Malibu Home For $45M appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

Affordable Rentals With Bathrooms That’ll Make You Go, “Ooo!”

Searching for a great place to rent under $1,500 can be a daunting task in many cities. Add a need for a stellar bathroom into the mix, and it can feel downright impossible. And yet, it’s not. There are affordable apartments with beautiful bathrooms. And once you start thinking about double sinks, sleek finishes, and storage to spare, you might decide it’s worth the hunt. Here are seven apartments with bathrooms that pack a lot of charm into a manageable rental rate.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

Like the look of this apartment’s bathroom? The kitchen matches. See more photos here.

Las Vegas, Nevada

Chill one-bedroom outside The Strip

$1,190/month

The Strip is all glitz and glamour, but just outside the heart of the city you can find a sense of calm in the Somerset at Providence neighborhood. This area of Las Vegas has very low crime and features a natural landscape with a number of different parks.

one-bedroom apartment at Liberty Square at Providence Apartments comes with the standard rental community amenities, like a pool, gym, and a nice clubhouse, but the bathroom goes beyond the ordinary. Wood-grain flooring, espresso cabinets topped with white granite countertops and two sinks—it’s almost like a spa. Or, at least, the bathroom at a spa. If you happen to have spent the day working in the chaotic Strip (or doing anything anywhere in the Las Vegas heat), it’s a perfect place to decompress.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

After a sunny, sweaty day out on the water, this apartment offers a lovely spot to get cleaned up. See more photos here.

Charleston, South Carolina

Modern apartment with Southern charm

$1,315/month

Charleston is becoming a desired city with its burgeoning food scene, gorgeous beaches, and Southern charm. The Sweetwater Rentals community on the north end of Charleston has all that, plus easy access to nearby Nowell Creek and Cooper River for boating and breathtaking landscapes.

Inside this one-bedroom rental, you’ll enjoy cheerful, white decor in a very spacious bathroom. The gray, granite countertop has plenty of room for toiletries, and the multiple lights bring a bright, daytime glow to the upbeat space.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

This place isn’t afraid of color, from the red mirror to accent walls throughout the apartment. See more photos here.

San Antonio, Texas

Sleek apartments in the heart of the city

$1,470/month

San Antonio is a lively city full of plenty of restaurants, nightlife, and activities for both young professionals and families. Arrive Elian Rentals is steps from it all with dozens of nearby restaurants and an IMAX movie theater. On the property, there are jogging trails, two outdoor pools, and an outdoor kitchen for entertaining friends.

And the bathroom is great? Inside this one-bedroom apartment’s powder room, you’ll find a blend of sleek, modern finishes and fun accents like a red-framed mirror that pops against gray-blue walls. The bathroom also has a separate tub and shower stall, giving you more options for getting clean than you’ll know what to do with.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

This spa-like look continues throughout the entire apartment community. See more photos here.

Birmingham, Alabama

Upscale one-bedroom in a low-key neighborhood

$1,391/month

Alabama’s largest city is a great place to live if you’re trying to stretch the dollar—Birmingham is one of the cities in the U.S. where your paycheck goes the furthest. This one-bedroom apartment in the Park 35 on Clairmont community is a case in point. It’s affordable, it’s right between a beautiful golf course and fun restaurants, and it’s in the young, majority-single, low-crime neighborhood of Forest Park. And then, there’s the bathroom.

The look of white walls against white subway tile against white cabinets against light floor tiles and silver finishes gives this bathroom a deeply serene vibe. And though the complex is pet-friendly, you don’t have to worry about clogging your lovely shower drain with Fido’s hair—there’s a self-service pet spa on site.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

As if this bathroom doesn’t look relaxing enough, the apartment has cozy deck, too. See more photos here.

Cincinnati, Ohio

Suburban style close to downtown
$1,490/month

Altitude Blue Ash apartment community in suburban Cincinnati checks many livability boxes for its walkability, proximity to downtown Blue Ash, and award-winning school districts. Just north of Cincinnati, Blue Ash offers plenty to do in its own right with great restaurants, like the Sleepy Bee Cafe and Bangkok Terrace.

Inside this affordable two-bedroom, you’ll find plenty of privacy, with a door separating the toilet from the sinks and closet space. The sink countertop is granite with plenty of storage below and is topped with a nice, long mirror to help you evaluate your look from any angle.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

This apartment is full of fun details, like oversized floor tiles and a retro backsplash in the kitchen. See more photos here.

Dallas, Texas

Retro charm a quirky community

$1,045/month

The picturesque Lakewood area of Dallas is home to many families and nature-lovers. It’s a generally pricey neighborhood, which makes the affordable Lakewood Plaza apartments an even better deal.  And if retro-chic is your idea of beautiful, the bathroom in this one-bedroom apartment definitely qualifies as lovely.

With shiny, mint tile wrapping around every wall and quirky, hexagonal floor tiles, this small-but-sweet bathroom turns on the charm. The look continues throughout the apartment, with a misty-green subway tile in the kitchen that’s equally adorable. And if you like the retro look of the place, you’ll love the look of the historic Lakewood Theater, a nearby landmark locals are currently trying to preserve.

 Looking for a beautiful bathroom to call your own? Find your next apartment on Trulia.

The post Affordable Rentals With Bathrooms That’ll Make You Go, “Ooo!” appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

Affordable Rentals With Bathrooms That’ll Make You Go, “Ooo!”

Searching for a great place to rent under $1,500 can be a daunting task in many cities. Add a need for a stellar bathroom into the mix, and it can feel downright impossible. And yet, it’s not. There are affordable apartments with beautiful bathrooms. And once you start thinking about double sinks, sleek finishes, and storage to spare, you might decide it’s worth the hunt. Here are seven apartments with bathrooms that pack a lot of charm into a manageable rental rate.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

Like the look of this apartment’s bathroom? The kitchen matches. See more photos here.

Las Vegas, Nevada

Chill one-bedroom outside The Strip

$1,190/month

The Strip is all glitz and glamour, but just outside the heart of the city you can find a sense of calm in the Somerset at Providence neighborhood. This area of Las Vegas has very low crime and features a natural landscape with a number of different parks.

one-bedroom apartment at Liberty Square at Providence Apartments comes with the standard rental community amenities, like a pool, gym, and a nice clubhouse, but the bathroom goes beyond the ordinary. Wood-grain flooring, espresso cabinets topped with white granite countertops and two sinks—it’s almost like a spa. Or, at least, the bathroom at a spa. If you happen to have spent the day working in the chaotic Strip (or doing anything anywhere in the Las Vegas heat), it’s a perfect place to decompress.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

After a sunny, sweaty day out on the water, this apartment offers a lovely spot to get cleaned up. See more photos here.

Charleston, South Carolina

Modern apartment with Southern charm

$1,315/month

Charleston is becoming a desired city with its burgeoning food scene, gorgeous beaches, and Southern charm. The Sweetwater Rentals community on the north end of Charleston has all that, plus easy access to nearby Nowell Creek and Cooper River for boating and breathtaking landscapes.

Inside this one-bedroom rental, you’ll enjoy cheerful, white decor in a very spacious bathroom. The gray, granite countertop has plenty of room for toiletries, and the multiple lights bring a bright, daytime glow to the upbeat space.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

This place isn’t afraid of color, from the red mirror to accent walls throughout the apartment. See more photos here.

San Antonio, Texas

Sleek apartments in the heart of the city

$1,470/month

San Antonio is a lively city full of plenty of restaurants, nightlife, and activities for both young professionals and families. Arrive Elian Rentals is steps from it all with dozens of nearby restaurants and an IMAX movie theater. On the property, there are jogging trails, two outdoor pools, and an outdoor kitchen for entertaining friends.

And the bathroom is great? Inside this one-bedroom apartment’s powder room, you’ll find a blend of sleek, modern finishes and fun accents like a red-framed mirror that pops against gray-blue walls. The bathroom also has a separate tub and shower stall, giving you more options for getting clean than you’ll know what to do with.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

This spa-like look continues throughout the entire apartment community. See more photos here.

Birmingham, Alabama

Upscale one-bedroom in a low-key neighborhood

$1,391/month

Alabama’s largest city is a great place to live if you’re trying to stretch the dollar—Birmingham is one of the cities in the U.S. where your paycheck goes the furthest. This one-bedroom apartment in the Park 35 on Clairmont community is a case in point. It’s affordable, it’s right between a beautiful golf course and fun restaurants, and it’s in the young, majority-single, low-crime neighborhood of Forest Park. And then, there’s the bathroom.

The look of white walls against white subway tile against white cabinets against light floor tiles and silver finishes gives this bathroom a deeply serene vibe. And though the complex is pet-friendly, you don’t have to worry about clogging your lovely shower drain with Fido’s hair—there’s a self-service pet spa on site.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

As if this bathroom doesn’t look relaxing enough, the apartment has cozy deck, too. See more photos here.

Cincinnati, Ohio

Suburban style close to downtown
$1,490/month

Altitude Blue Ash apartment community in suburban Cincinnati checks many livability boxes for its walkability, proximity to downtown Blue Ash, and award-winning school districts. Just north of Cincinnati, Blue Ash offers plenty to do in its own right with great restaurants, like the Sleepy Bee Cafe and Bangkok Terrace.

Inside this affordable two-bedroom, you’ll find plenty of privacy, with a door separating the toilet from the sinks and closet space. The sink countertop is granite with plenty of storage below and is topped with a nice, long mirror to help you evaluate your look from any angle.

 

rentals with beautiful bathrooms

This apartment is full of fun details, like oversized floor tiles and a retro backsplash in the kitchen. See more photos here.

Dallas, Texas

Retro charm a quirky community

$1,045/month

The picturesque Lakewood area of Dallas is home to many families and nature-lovers. It’s a generally pricey neighborhood, which makes the affordable Lakewood Plaza apartments an even better deal.  And if retro-chic is your idea of beautiful, the bathroom in this one-bedroom apartment definitely qualifies as lovely.

With shiny, mint tile wrapping around every wall and quirky, hexagonal floor tiles, this small-but-sweet bathroom turns on the charm. The look continues throughout the apartment, with a misty-green subway tile in the kitchen that’s equally adorable. And if you like the retro look of the place, you’ll love the look of the historic Lakewood Theater, a nearby landmark locals are currently trying to preserve.

 Looking for a beautiful bathroom to call your own? Find your next apartment on Trulia.

The post Affordable Rentals With Bathrooms That’ll Make You Go, “Ooo!” appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

What It’s Like to Live in These American Gayborhoods

The Castro. Greenwich Village. Chelsea. America’s most historic LGBTQ neighborhoods have plenty of name recognition, but lesser-known gayborhoods are in almost every city in the country. And living in them is not all Pride parades and rainbow-clad bars (although there are plenty of those, too). From Salt Lake City to suburban Atlanta, we take an inside look at everyday life in these five fascinating gayborhoods.

 

South End, Boston

Good music is easy to find in Boston’s South End. See available homes here.

South End, Boston

Boston’s South End was once a jazz stronghold—now it’s a gay one.

With its collection of immaculately preserved Victorian row houses (the largest in the nation), handsome public parks, and sought-after restaurants, the South End is considered one of Boston’s most desirable neighborhoods. It’s also the gayest: According to the 2010 census, it was the city’s most popular neighborhood for same-sex male couples.

In the mid-19th century, the area was a haven for wealthy urbanites. When they fled for the suburbs in the early 20th century, the neighborhood became a home for African Americans, who brought jazz to the South End. Between 1915 and 1917, the top black musicians’ union in the country had its offices in the South End. Wally’s Cafe, one of the last remaining jazz clubs in the area, keeps the neighborhood’s musical legacy alive today.

Outside of jazz, there are many other beloved nightlife spots to be found—including the Boston Eagle, a long-running gay bar. These buzzy spots keep South End’s commercial district running late into the night, mostly with young professionals. But many of the leafy side streets are whisper-quiet. “While a lot of people like to say the South End is gentrifying, it’s not all for the worst,” says Jeffrey Borst, a retiree who has lived in the neighborhood for 12 years. “More families are moving in, and the food scene is better than ever. You don’t need to go to other neighborhoods for good food anymore.”

The centrally-located and increasingly swanky South End is among Boston’s pricier areas. The median home sales price is $905,000. (Elsewhere in Boston it’s $620,000.) Median rent lands at $5,350. The good news is the South End has plenty available to buy or rent.


 

 

Avondale Estates, Georgia

Avondale Estates Georgia is as quaint a town as they come. See available homes here.

Avondale Estates, Georgia

 Avondale Estates is home to the Georgia General Assembly’s first openly gay representative—and she’s still serving after 17 years.

This tight-knit community is only eight miles east of Atlanta, though it can feel more like England. Named after Shakespeare’s birthplace, Avondale Estates is full of tree-lined streets, small-town charm and an impressive collection of Tudor Revival architecture. Even the downtown looks straight out of the English countryside (complete with the Towne Cinema).

Avondale Estates not only has the state’s highest population of same-sex couples, it’s also had a gay representative, Karla Drenner, since 2001. She was the first openly gay person elected to the Georgia General Assembly and is now one of only four LGBTQ representatives.

The well-behaved suburb offers a flourishing food and arts scene—every fall is the annual AutumnFest, which brings together local artisans and food (including an apple pie contest). Because of the many families that call the Estates home—it’s home to a popular magnet school—expect to see lots of strollers on the streets, and plenty of family-friendly dining and entertainment options. “We really hit the jackpot,” one resident says in a Trulia school review.

Avondale Estates—while still affordable, compared to other parts of metro Atlanta—is seeing substantial growth in home value. The median sales price for homes is $322,500, up from $292,900 the year before. The median rent is $1,947, but the market for rentals can be scarce.


 

 

Marmalade District, Salt Lake City

Want to live in Salt Lake City’s Marmalade District? Knowing how to preserve fruit will come in handy. See available homes here.

Marmalade District, Salt Lake City

The Marmalade District was named after fruit preserves, so of course its first gay bar was called “Club Jam.”

Salt Lake City—or Utah for that matter—probably isn’t the first place people think of when they think of LGBTQ enclaves. But the city’s historic Marmalade District, located just north of downtown and west of the Capitol Building, has been drawing LGBTQ individuals for at least a decade—and they’ve helped shaped Salt Lake City into a welcoming place for all kinds of people.

The neighborhood was the original home of the Utah Pride Center, but many locals credit the 2007 opening of Club Jam, the neighborhood’s first gay bar, for sowing the seeds of inclusivity.

Speaking of seeds, the neighborhood was named after the fruit trees planted by early settlers, and every year the neighborhood council hosts the Marmalade Jam Fest, which features a fruit preservation competition.

The Marmalade District is quiet, residential, and picturesque. “Many parks, historic sites, cultural opportunities nearby,” one resident says on Trulia’s What Locals Say. “Ensign Peak is a couple of miles to the north, and is one of my favorite spots with stunning views of the entire south and western valley.”

The Marmalade District is considered part of the Capitol Hill neighborhood. It’s among the city’s priciest areas—the average listing price is $720,566. (The average listing price in all of Salt Lake City is $432,629.) In Marmalade, in particular, many of the homes are historic and highly coveted. The eclectic mix of homes feature examples of Carpenter, Gothic, and Italianate architecture.


 

 

Andersonville, Chicago

Andersonville is a gayborhood with more than its fair share of pickled herring and knäckebröd. See available homes here.

Andersonville, Chicago

Andersonville has a Scandinavian past and an LGBTQ present. 

The Boystown neighborhood may get all the credit—what with being the nation’s first officially recognized gay village and all—but nearby Andersonville, about seven miles north of downtown Chicago, is a gayborhood unlike any other. Swedish farmers first settled the area in the mid-19th century, and the neighborhood still has a strong Scandinavian identity, anchored by the Swedish American Museum and an assortment of Swedish bakeries and restaurants.

The community of about 110,000 has long been considered a lesbian enclave—it’s sometimes referred to as “Girlstown.” Many locals point to the opening of the feminist and LGBTQ-oriented Women and Children First bookstore in the early ’90s for the initial influx of lesbians to the neighborhood, and it’s still a neighborhood institution.

Thanks to Andersonville’s well-regarded public schools, more families are starting to call the neighborhood home. But young, single adults can still find a bustling downtown area with beloved, locally-owned shops and bars. “We don’t like to leave on the weekends,” Karen Krider says, who’s lived in the neighborhood with her family for six years. “It’s a small town not far from the big city, and a quiet, lovely place to return to each night.”

You can also find great value for your dollar in Andersonville. The median home price is $275,000. The median rent is around $3,850, and there are lots of properties to be found.


 

 

Washington Square West

When the neighborhood is named after a park, you know it’s going to be pretty. See available homes here.

Washington Square West, Philadelphia

Washington Square West’s rainbow-hued street signs make it one of four LGBT districts in North America to be visibly marked.

Though it was first coined “The Gayborhood” by a local newspaper writer in 1992, Philadelphia’s Washington Square West had long been the city’s epicenter of LGBTQ activity. Throughout the ’70s and ’80s, it was the center of Philadelphia’s gay bathhouse culture. In 2007, the city officially recognized the area as a gay village and added gay pride rainbow flag symbols to street signs throughout the neighborhood.

Washington Square West is within walking distance of all the city’s major commercial districts—but there are lots of local shops and restaurants, too, including many with outdoor seating, like Talula’s Garden.

“This neighborhood is central to everything,” one resident says on Trulia’s What Locals Say reviews. “I can’t think of a neighborhood with a better location.” The area buzzes with pedestrian traffic during the day, and its many bars keep it hopping late into the night. But the stately Washington Square offers a peaceful escape from the city’s hustle and bustle. On warm days, kids can be seen playing in the square’s fountain.

In Washington Square West, the average home price is $414,250, and the median rent falls around $2,600.

Looking for a more inclusive neighborhood? Find what’s available in these communities and more on Trulia.

The post What It’s Like to Live in These American Gayborhoods appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

What It’s Like to Live in These American Gayborhoods

The Castro. Greenwich Village. Chelsea. America’s most historic LGBTQ neighborhoods have plenty of name recognition, but lesser-known gayborhoods are in almost every city in the country. And living in them is not all Pride parades and rainbow-clad bars (although there are plenty of those, too). From Salt Lake City to suburban Atlanta, we take an inside look at everyday life in these five fascinating gayborhoods.

 

South End, Boston

Good music is easy to find in Boston’s South End. See available homes here.

South End, Boston

Boston’s South End was once a jazz stronghold—now it’s a gay one.

With its collection of immaculately preserved Victorian row houses (the largest in the nation), handsome public parks, and sought-after restaurants, the South End is considered one of Boston’s most desirable neighborhoods. It’s also the gayest: According to the 2010 census, it was the city’s most popular neighborhood for same-sex male couples.

In the mid-19th century, the area was a haven for wealthy urbanites. When they fled for the suburbs in the early 20th century, the neighborhood became a home for African Americans, who brought jazz to the South End. Between 1915 and 1917, the top black musicians’ union in the country had its offices in the South End. Wally’s Cafe, one of the last remaining jazz clubs in the area, keeps the neighborhood’s musical legacy alive today.

Outside of jazz, there are many other beloved nightlife spots to be found—including the Boston Eagle, a long-running gay bar. These buzzy spots keep South End’s commercial district running late into the night, mostly with young professionals. But many of the leafy side streets are whisper-quiet. “While a lot of people like to say the South End is gentrifying, it’s not all for the worst,” says Jeffrey Borst, a retiree who has lived in the neighborhood for 12 years. “More families are moving in, and the food scene is better than ever. You don’t need to go to other neighborhoods for good food anymore.”

The centrally-located and increasingly swanky South End is among Boston’s pricier areas. The median home sales price is $905,000. (Elsewhere in Boston it’s $620,000.) Median rent lands at $5,350. The good news is the South End has plenty available to buy or rent.


 

 

Avondale Estates, Georgia

Avondale Estates Georgia is as quaint a town as they come. See available homes here.

Avondale Estates, Georgia

 Avondale Estates is home to the Georgia General Assembly’s first openly gay representative—and she’s still serving after 17 years.

This tight-knit community is only eight miles east of Atlanta, though it can feel more like England. Named after Shakespeare’s birthplace, Avondale Estates is full of tree-lined streets, small-town charm and an impressive collection of Tudor Revival architecture. Even the downtown looks straight out of the English countryside (complete with the Towne Cinema).

Avondale Estates not only has the state’s highest population of same-sex couples, it’s also had a gay representative, Karla Drenner, since 2001. She was the first openly gay person elected to the Georgia General Assembly and is now one of only four LGBTQ representatives.

The well-behaved suburb offers a flourishing food and arts scene—every fall is the annual AutumnFest, which brings together local artisans and food (including an apple pie contest). Because of the many families that call the Estates home—it’s home to a popular magnet school—expect to see lots of strollers on the streets, and plenty of family-friendly dining and entertainment options. “We really hit the jackpot,” one resident says in a Trulia school review.

Avondale Estates—while still affordable, compared to other parts of metro Atlanta—is seeing substantial growth in home value. The median sales price for homes is $322,500, up from $292,900 the year before. The median rent is $1,947, but the market for rentals can be scarce.


 

 

Marmalade District, Salt Lake City

Want to live in Salt Lake City’s Marmalade District? Knowing how to preserve fruit will come in handy. See available homes here.

Marmalade District, Salt Lake City

The Marmalade District was named after fruit preserves, so of course its first gay bar was called “Club Jam.”

Salt Lake City—or Utah for that matter—probably isn’t the first place people think of when they think of LGBTQ enclaves. But the city’s historic Marmalade District, located just north of downtown and west of the Capitol Building, has been drawing LGBTQ individuals for at least a decade—and they’ve helped shaped Salt Lake City into a welcoming place for all kinds of people.

The neighborhood was the original home of the Utah Pride Center, but many locals credit the 2007 opening of Club Jam, the neighborhood’s first gay bar, for sowing the seeds of inclusivity.

Speaking of seeds, the neighborhood was named after the fruit trees planted by early settlers, and every year the neighborhood council hosts the Marmalade Jam Fest, which features a fruit preservation competition.

The Marmalade District is quiet, residential, and picturesque. “Many parks, historic sites, cultural opportunities nearby,” one resident says on Trulia’s What Locals Say. “Ensign Peak is a couple of miles to the north, and is one of my favorite spots with stunning views of the entire south and western valley.”

The Marmalade District is considered part of the Capitol Hill neighborhood. It’s among the city’s priciest areas—the average listing price is $720,566. (The average listing price in all of Salt Lake City is $432,629.) In Marmalade, in particular, many of the homes are historic and highly coveted. The eclectic mix of homes feature examples of Carpenter, Gothic, and Italianate architecture.


 

 

Andersonville, Chicago

Andersonville is a gayborhood with more than its fair share of pickled herring and knäckebröd. See available homes here.

Andersonville, Chicago

Andersonville has a Scandinavian past and an LGBTQ present. 

The Boystown neighborhood may get all the credit—what with being the nation’s first officially recognized gay village and all—but nearby Andersonville, about seven miles north of downtown Chicago, is a gayborhood unlike any other. Swedish farmers first settled the area in the mid-19th century, and the neighborhood still has a strong Scandinavian identity, anchored by the Swedish American Museum and an assortment of Swedish bakeries and restaurants.

The community of about 110,000 has long been considered a lesbian enclave—it’s sometimes referred to as “Girlstown.” Many locals point to the opening of the feminist and LGBTQ-oriented Women and Children First bookstore in the early ’90s for the initial influx of lesbians to the neighborhood, and it’s still a neighborhood institution.

Thanks to Andersonville’s well-regarded public schools, more families are starting to call the neighborhood home. But young, single adults can still find a bustling downtown area with beloved, locally-owned shops and bars. “We don’t like to leave on the weekends,” Karen Krider says, who’s lived in the neighborhood with her family for six years. “It’s a small town not far from the big city, and a quiet, lovely place to return to each night.”

You can also find great value for your dollar in Andersonville. The median home price is $275,000. The median rent is around $3,850, and there are lots of properties to be found.


 

 

Washington Square West

When the neighborhood is named after a park, you know it’s going to be pretty. See available homes here.

Washington Square West, Philadelphia

Washington Square West’s rainbow-hued street signs make it one of four LGBT districts in North America to be visibly marked.

Though it was first coined “The Gayborhood” by a local newspaper writer in 1992, Philadelphia’s Washington Square West had long been the city’s epicenter of LGBTQ activity. Throughout the ’70s and ’80s, it was the center of Philadelphia’s gay bathhouse culture. In 2007, the city officially recognized the area as a gay village and added gay pride rainbow flag symbols to street signs throughout the neighborhood.

Washington Square West is within walking distance of all the city’s major commercial districts—but there are lots of local shops and restaurants, too, including many with outdoor seating, like Talula’s Garden.

“This neighborhood is central to everything,” one resident says on Trulia’s What Locals Say reviews. “I can’t think of a neighborhood with a better location.” The area buzzes with pedestrian traffic during the day, and its many bars keep it hopping late into the night. But the stately Washington Square offers a peaceful escape from the city’s hustle and bustle. On warm days, kids can be seen playing in the square’s fountain.

In Washington Square West, the average home price is $414,250, and the median rent falls around $2,600.

Looking for a more inclusive neighborhood? Find what’s available in these communities and more on Trulia.

The post What It’s Like to Live in These American Gayborhoods appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

What It’s Like to Live in These American Gayborhoods

The Castro. Greenwich Village. Chelsea. America’s most historic LGBTQ neighborhoods have plenty of name recognition, but lesser-known gayborhoods are in almost every city in the country. And living in them is not all Pride parades and rainbow-clad bars (although there are plenty of those, too). From Salt Lake City to suburban Atlanta, we take an inside look at everyday life in these five fascinating gayborhoods.

 

South End, Boston

Good music is easy to find in Boston’s South End. See available homes here.

South End, Boston

Boston’s South End was once a jazz stronghold—now it’s a gay one.

With its collection of immaculately preserved Victorian row houses (the largest in the nation), handsome public parks, and sought-after restaurants, the South End is considered one of Boston’s most desirable neighborhoods. It’s also the gayest: According to the 2010 census, it was the city’s most popular neighborhood for same-sex male couples.

In the mid-19th century, the area was a haven for wealthy urbanites. When they fled for the suburbs in the early 20th century, the neighborhood became a home for African Americans, who brought jazz to the South End. Between 1915 and 1917, the top black musicians’ union in the country had its offices in the South End. Wally’s Cafe, one of the last remaining jazz clubs in the area, keeps the neighborhood’s musical legacy alive today.

Outside of jazz, there are many other beloved nightlife spots to be found—including the Boston Eagle, a long-running gay bar. These buzzy spots keep South End’s commercial district running late into the night, mostly with young professionals. But many of the leafy side streets are whisper-quiet. “While a lot of people like to say the South End is gentrifying, it’s not all for the worst,” says Jeffrey Borst, a retiree who has lived in the neighborhood for 12 years. “More families are moving in, and the food scene is better than ever. You don’t need to go to other neighborhoods for good food anymore.”

The centrally-located and increasingly swanky South End is among Boston’s pricier areas. The median home sales price is $905,000. (Elsewhere in Boston it’s $620,000.) Median rent lands at $5,350. The good news is the South End has plenty available to buy or rent.


 

 

Avondale Estates, Georgia

Avondale Estates Georgia is as quaint a town as they come. See available homes here.

Avondale Estates, Georgia

 Avondale Estates is home to the Georgia General Assembly’s first openly gay representative—and she’s still serving after 17 years.

This tight-knit community is only eight miles east of Atlanta, though it can feel more like England. Named after Shakespeare’s birthplace, Avondale Estates is full of tree-lined streets, small-town charm and an impressive collection of Tudor Revival architecture. Even the downtown looks straight out of the English countryside (complete with the Towne Cinema).

Avondale Estates not only has the state’s highest population of same-sex couples, it’s also had a gay representative, Karla Drenner, since 2001. She was the first openly gay person elected to the Georgia General Assembly and is now one of only four LGBTQ representatives.

The well-behaved suburb offers a flourishing food and arts scene—every fall is the annual AutumnFest, which brings together local artisans and food (including an apple pie contest). Because of the many families that call the Estates home—it’s home to a popular magnet school—expect to see lots of strollers on the streets, and plenty of family-friendly dining and entertainment options. “We really hit the jackpot,” one resident says in a Trulia school review.

Avondale Estates—while still affordable, compared to other parts of metro Atlanta—is seeing substantial growth in home value. The median sales price for homes is $322,500, up from $292,900 the year before. The median rent is $1,947, but the market for rentals can be scarce.


 

 

Marmalade District, Salt Lake City

Want to live in Salt Lake City’s Marmalade District? Knowing how to preserve fruit will come in handy. See available homes here.

Marmalade District, Salt Lake City

The Marmalade District was named after fruit preserves, so of course its first gay bar was called “Club Jam.”

Salt Lake City—or Utah for that matter—probably isn’t the first place people think of when they think of LGBTQ enclaves. But the city’s historic Marmalade District, located just north of downtown and west of the Capitol Building, has been drawing LGBTQ individuals for at least a decade—and they’ve helped shaped Salt Lake City into a welcoming place for all kinds of people.

The neighborhood was the original home of the Utah Pride Center, but many locals credit the 2007 opening of Club Jam, the neighborhood’s first gay bar, for sowing the seeds of inclusivity.

Speaking of seeds, the neighborhood was named after the fruit trees planted by early settlers, and every year the neighborhood council hosts the Marmalade Jam Fest, which features a fruit preservation competition.

The Marmalade District is quiet, residential, and picturesque. “Many parks, historic sites, cultural opportunities nearby,” one resident says on Trulia’s What Locals Say. “Ensign Peak is a couple of miles to the north, and is one of my favorite spots with stunning views of the entire south and western valley.”

The Marmalade District is considered part of the Capitol Hill neighborhood. It’s among the city’s priciest areas—the average listing price is $720,566. (The average listing price in all of Salt Lake City is $432,629.) In Marmalade, in particular, many of the homes are historic and highly coveted. The eclectic mix of homes feature examples of Carpenter, Gothic, and Italianate architecture.


 

 

Andersonville, Chicago

Andersonville is a gayborhood with more than its fair share of pickled herring and knäckebröd. See available homes here.

Andersonville, Chicago

Andersonville has a Scandinavian past and an LGBTQ present. 

The Boystown neighborhood may get all the credit—what with being the nation’s first officially recognized gay village and all—but nearby Andersonville, about seven miles north of downtown Chicago, is a gayborhood unlike any other. Swedish farmers first settled the area in the mid-19th century, and the neighborhood still has a strong Scandinavian identity, anchored by the Swedish American Museum and an assortment of Swedish bakeries and restaurants.

The community of about 110,000 has long been considered a lesbian enclave—it’s sometimes referred to as “Girlstown.” Many locals point to the opening of the feminist and LGBTQ-oriented Women and Children First bookstore in the early ’90s for the initial influx of lesbians to the neighborhood, and it’s still a neighborhood institution.

Thanks to Andersonville’s well-regarded public schools, more families are starting to call the neighborhood home. But young, single adults can still find a bustling downtown area with beloved, locally-owned shops and bars. “We don’t like to leave on the weekends,” Karen Krider says, who’s lived in the neighborhood with her family for six years. “It’s a small town not far from the big city, and a quiet, lovely place to return to each night.”

You can also find great value for your dollar in Andersonville. The median home price is $275,000. The median rent is around $3,850, and there are lots of properties to be found.


 

 

Washington Square West

When the neighborhood is named after a park, you know it’s going to be pretty. See available homes here.

Washington Square West, Philadelphia

Washington Square West’s rainbow-hued street signs make it one of four LGBT districts in North America to be visibly marked.

Though it was first coined “The Gayborhood” by a local newspaper writer in 1992, Philadelphia’s Washington Square West had long been the city’s epicenter of LGBTQ activity. Throughout the ’70s and ’80s, it was the center of Philadelphia’s gay bathhouse culture. In 2007, the city officially recognized the area as a gay village and added gay pride rainbow flag symbols to street signs throughout the neighborhood.

Washington Square West is within walking distance of all the city’s major commercial districts—but there are lots of local shops and restaurants, too, including many with outdoor seating, like Talula’s Garden.

“This neighborhood is central to everything,” one resident says on Trulia’s What Locals Say reviews. “I can’t think of a neighborhood with a better location.” The area buzzes with pedestrian traffic during the day, and its many bars keep it hopping late into the night. But the stately Washington Square offers a peaceful escape from the city’s hustle and bustle. On warm days, kids can be seen playing in the square’s fountain.

In Washington Square West, the average home price is $414,250, and the median rent falls around $2,600.

Looking for a more inclusive neighborhood? Find what’s available in these communities and more on Trulia.

The post What It’s Like to Live in These American Gayborhoods appeared first on Trulia's Blog.