What Locals Love About Their Austin Neighborhoods

If you’re thinking about moving to Austin, one of the most important things to figure out is what neighborhoods might be a good fit for you. Do you want to be close to the action or somewhere quieter? Are you a family with kids or a recent college grad just starting to build your adult life? Austin has neighborhoods to suit almost anyone – but if you really want to understand what an area has to offer, you have to talk to the people who live there. Which is why Trulia has added a new feature – What Locals Say – to every home listing. More than fifteen million locals have shared insights about their neighborhoods, and an average of 100,000 reviews are being added every day. We used that data to identify four very special, and very different, Austin neighborhoods that you might want to consider in your home search.

What Locals Love About Bouldin

Best for: A taste of all the things that make Austin Austin

If some locals consider this hip enclave to be the best neighborhood in all of Austin, it’s for a good reason. Bouldin, a historic zone just across the river from downtown’s core, contains a taste of all of the things that make the city great. And while it has a reputation for being a paradise for young singles, it’s much more than that – which you find when you dig into the numbers.

Fans of urban living value one neighborhood characteristic above all others: walkability. And Bouldin sure is walkable. Want to be able to mosey to cool bars and hot restaurants? Check, according to 94% of residents, with almost the same number adding that the neighborhood is a safe place to walk alone at night – and a large majority appreciating the fact that even there are sidewalks, which is not a given in this car-oriented town. Interested in a tattoo? Bouldin has you (literally, if that’s your style) covered. Are you an Asian-food fan? Great, because Bouldin features some of the best Vietnamese and Thai restaurants in the city. Enjoy silence? So do your potential neighbors, despite the lively shopping and dining scene on the main drags, with 82% describing Bouldin as quiet. Love dogs? A resounding 100% of locals who weighed in on the matter describe the hood as ‘dog friendly.’ And while 75% of residents say you are probably going to want to own a car, the same number note that you won’t need it for errands like grocery shopping. As one local puts it: “Living so near [downtown] and having the peace and quiet of a suburban neighborhood gives you the feeling that every day is a vacation. What a great place to live!


A main street in Bouldin



Locals love Bouldin’s walkability.

If you’re interested in more of what Bouldin has to offer, here are some key spots to check out during your visit:

  • Best mega-Austin-y restaurant: The popular and bohemian Bouldin Creek Cafe, which one local describes as ‘the best Vegan diner on earth”
  • Best Vietnamese restaurant: Elizabeth Street Cafe, which also serves delicious French-Vietnamese baked goods
  • Best castle: Bouldin Castle, a Franciscan monastery-turned-spectacular medieval-inspired home  
  • Best park: Town Lake Memorial Park, which hugs the Colorado river with spectacular views of downtown
  • Best concert hall: The Long Center for the Performing Arts
  • Best neon-sign gallery: Roadhouse Relics, where local artist Todd Sanders crafts vintage-style designs
  • Best landmark: The famous ‘Greetings from Austin’ mural
  • Second-best landmark: The statue of late blues-guitar master Stevie Ray Vaughan

A busy street in Bouldin

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What Locals Love About Hyde Park

Best for: Bookish, crunchy, and mellow families who want a small-town feel in the big city

If you are looking for a small-town feel, historic Hyde Park – which is overwhelmingly residential and full of turn-of-the-century homes – is the move. The neighborhood has a longstanding reputation for being brainy, with deep connections to the nearby University of Texas,  and a little bit hippy. But dig into the numbers and you’ll find one of the most interesting residential zones in the city.

Victorian mansions meet modest bungalows in this leafy, historically protected district. But even though it is mostly residential, locals love the Hyde Park’s convenience to all key amenities. More than 95% of residents say that grocery shopping and dining are within easy walking distance (although this is still car-oriented Austin and 93% say you need a car). That urban feeling has some trade-offs, though, with less than half of residents finding their neighbors friendly or lauding their “holiday spirit.” But everyone loves dogs, with 100% claiming dog-friendliness, and even if you need to have a car, a solid 85% say that parking is no problem. As one local fan proclaims, “Great homes with character, walkable, friendly neighbors. The best!”


A Hyde Park local establishment



Quack’s Bakery is a Hyde Park staple.

Considering living in Hyde Park and planning on swinging by the neighborhood? Here are some things to look for:

  • Best bakery: Get a cupcake at Quack’s 43rd Street Bakery
  • Best coffee spot: Flightpath Coffeehouse, where the beard-and-glasses crowd huddle around Macbooks working on their dissertations  
  • Best historic home-turned-museum: The Elisabet Ney Museum, former home and workplace of the acclaimed German-American sculptor
  • Best hippie cafe: Mother’s, a classic vegetarian spot
  • Best comedy club: ColdTowne Theater, where you can also take an improv class
  • Best diner: Every neighborhood should have a diner, and the Omlettery is Hyde Park’s
  • Best import: In N’ Out Burger

Tree lined street in Hyde Park

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What Locals Love About Old West Austin

Best for: Hip families with young kids who love urban amenities

Back in 1991, Richard Linklater put both Austin and a certain style of local resident on the map with his groundbreaking feature-film debut, Slacker. And if you want to feel like you are a part of that movie, you could do worse than moving to – and spending your days drifting though – lovely Old West Austin’s vintage record stores, thrift shops, blues bars, and hip locavore restaurants. The ‘old’ part of the neighborhood’s name tells a big part of the story – it is one of the oldest areas in Austin, and its historic housing stock is protected by landmark laws. In part because of its location just west of downtown, Old West Austin also has a reputation for being a place that younger people, often just out of college, gravitate to, but if you talk to the locals and look art the numbers you’ll find a different story.

While Old West Austin is a great fit for young singles, it really shines as family neighborhood. A large majority of residents say that it’s safe for kids to play outside, which isn’t true of many nearby areas. They also agree that neighbors are friendly, holiday spirit abounds, dogs are loved, and it is safe to walk through at night. While virtually everyone agrees that you’ll need a car, 98% say parking is easy, and once you are in the neighborhood and looking for evening or weekend activities, you won’t need it much: 96% say grocery shopping is an easy walk, and 88% say the same of dining out. Parks, playground and hiking and biking trails abound. As one enthused resident puts it: “Dogs, people, location is great! Really special place that I can’t imagine living elsewhere! Never moving!”





Residents get a taste of Old West Austin in this rustic establishment.

If you want to get a taste of Old West Austin, here are some spots to check out:

  • Best vintage soda fountain: Grab a burger and a shake at Nau’s Enfield Drug’s vintage lunch counter in the back of a pharmacy
  • Best beer and wine bar: Chill out on the patio at Mean Eyed Cat
  • Best beach: Rent a kayak, ride a bike, or just catch a tan at Ladybird Lake-Lamar Beach Metro Park
  • Best bookstore: Bookpeople is a locally owned classic
  • Best record store: Waterloo Records is the indie record store of your Slacker-inspired dreams
  • Best Locavore restaurant: Get a reservation at Wink, a neighborhood institution
  • Best coffee spot: Caffe Medici

Locals kayaking and paddle boarding in Old West Austin

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What Locals Love About Allandale

Best for: Families looking for suburban amenities with a dash of Austin weird

This affluent north-central Austin neighborhood has everything a professional family might need: good schools, a wide variety of single-family homes on good-sized lots, parks and easy access to shopping an amenities. But it’s still Austin – and that means that there aren’t just Walmarts (although there is one of those) – there are also plenty of vibe-y bars, shops, and locavore restaurants. The neighborhood is also well served by public transportation, and sporty commuters have the option of a bike path that takes you all the way downtown. And if you talk to the locals and look at the numbers, you’ll understand why this is such a special place to live.

Everything a growing family might care about are the areas in which Allandale excels. More than 80% say that kids are safe to play outside – a high number for Austin. More than 95% say that yards are well-tended, parking is a breeze, and dogs are loved. More than 90% love the sidewalks and walkable grocery shopping. And a large majority say they are in for the long haul – with 79% saying they plan to remain in the area for at least five years. As one resident puts it, “I love this area! It’s close to everything and still secluded from the hustle of the city. The neighbors are super friendly.”


Austin Spider Tree



Allandale keeps Austin weird with their Austin Spider Tree.

If you’re considering Allandale, here are some neighborhood highlights to consider:

  • Best donuts: Gourdough’s has a wide variety of sweet treats
  • Best tiny pies: Tiny Pies bakes sweet and savory personal-sized pies
  • Best Mexican-Korean fusion: Get Korean barbecue in a taco at Chi’lantro
  • Best outdoor hang: Yard Bar is a dog-friendly spot for local beers and bites
  • Best Park: Sheffield Northwest Park’s playgrounds, lake, and tennis courts are the heart of the neighborhood
  • Best refurbished gas station: Phil’s Ice House, where you can grab a solid burger

A main street in Allandale

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The post What Locals Love About Their Austin Neighborhoods appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

What Locals Love About Their Austin Neighborhoods

If you’re thinking about moving to Austin, one of the most important things to figure out is what neighborhoods might be a good fit for you. Do you want to be close to the action or somewhere quieter? Are you a family with kids or a recent college grad just starting to build your adult life? Austin has neighborhoods to suit almost anyone – but if you really want to understand what an area has to offer, you have to talk to the people who live there. Which is why Trulia has added a new feature – What Locals Say – to every home listing. More than fifteen million locals have shared insights about their neighborhoods, and an average of 100,000 reviews are being added every day. We used that data to identify four very special, and very different, Austin neighborhoods that you might want to consider in your home search.

What Locals Love About Bouldin

Best for: A taste of all the things that make Austin Austin

If some locals consider this hip enclave to be the best neighborhood in all of Austin, it’s for a good reason. Bouldin, a historic zone just across the river from downtown’s core, contains a taste of all of the things that make the city great. And while it has a reputation for being a paradise for young singles, it’s much more than that – which you find when you dig into the numbers.

Fans of urban living value one neighborhood characteristic above all others: walkability. And Bouldin sure is walkable. Want to be able to mosey to cool bars and hot restaurants? Check, according to 94% of residents, with almost the same number adding that the neighborhood is a safe place to walk alone at night – and a large majority appreciating the fact that even there are sidewalks, which is not a given in this car-oriented town. Interested in a tattoo? Bouldin has you (literally, if that’s your style) covered. Are you an Asian-food fan? Great, because Bouldin features some of the best Vietnamese and Thai restaurants in the city. Enjoy silence? So do your potential neighbors, despite the lively shopping and dining scene on the main drags, with 82% describing Bouldin as quiet. Love dogs? A resounding 100% of locals who weighed in on the matter describe the hood as ‘dog friendly.’ And while 75% of residents say you are probably going to want to own a car, the same number note that you won’t need it for errands like grocery shopping. As one local puts it: “Living so near [downtown] and having the peace and quiet of a suburban neighborhood gives you the feeling that every day is a vacation. What a great place to live!


A main street in Bouldin



Locals love Bouldin’s walkability.

If you’re interested in more of what Bouldin has to offer, here are some key spots to check out during your visit:

  • Best mega-Austin-y restaurant: The popular and bohemian Bouldin Creek Cafe, which one local describes as ‘the best Vegan diner on earth”
  • Best Vietnamese restaurant: Elizabeth Street Cafe, which also serves delicious French-Vietnamese baked goods
  • Best castle: Bouldin Castle, a Franciscan monastery-turned-spectacular medieval-inspired home  
  • Best park: Town Lake Memorial Park, which hugs the Colorado river with spectacular views of downtown
  • Best concert hall: The Long Center for the Performing Arts
  • Best neon-sign gallery: Roadhouse Relics, where local artist Todd Sanders crafts vintage-style designs
  • Best landmark: The famous ‘Greetings from Austin’ mural
  • Second-best landmark: The statue of late blues-guitar master Stevie Ray Vaughan

A busy street in Bouldin

Check out homes in Bouldin

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What Locals Love About Hyde Park

Best for: Bookish, crunchy, and mellow families who want a small-town feel in the big city

If you are looking for a small-town feel, historic Hyde Park – which is overwhelmingly residential and full of turn-of-the-century homes – is the move. The neighborhood has a longstanding reputation for being brainy, with deep connections to the nearby University of Texas,  and a little bit hippy. But dig into the numbers and you’ll find one of the most interesting residential zones in the city.

Victorian mansions meet modest bungalows in this leafy, historically protected district. But even though it is mostly residential, locals love the Hyde Park’s convenience to all key amenities. More than 95% of residents say that grocery shopping and dining are within easy walking distance (although this is still car-oriented Austin and 93% say you need a car). That urban feeling has some trade-offs, though, with less than half of residents finding their neighbors friendly or lauding their “holiday spirit.” But everyone loves dogs, with 100% claiming dog-friendliness, and even if you need to have a car, a solid 85% say that parking is no problem. As one local fan proclaims, “Great homes with character, walkable, friendly neighbors. The best!”


A Hyde Park local establishment



Quack’s Bakery is a Hyde Park staple.

Considering living in Hyde Park and planning on swinging by the neighborhood? Here are some things to look for:

  • Best bakery: Get a cupcake at Quack’s 43rd Street Bakery
  • Best coffee spot: Flightpath Coffeehouse, where the beard-and-glasses crowd huddle around Macbooks working on their dissertations  
  • Best historic home-turned-museum: The Elisabet Ney Museum, former home and workplace of the acclaimed German-American sculptor
  • Best hippie cafe: Mother’s, a classic vegetarian spot
  • Best comedy club: ColdTowne Theater, where you can also take an improv class
  • Best diner: Every neighborhood should have a diner, and the Omlettery is Hyde Park’s
  • Best import: In N’ Out Burger

Tree lined street in Hyde Park

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What Locals Love About Old West Austin

Best for: Hip families with young kids who love urban amenities

Back in 1991, Richard Linklater put both Austin and a certain style of local resident on the map with his groundbreaking feature-film debut, Slacker. And if you want to feel like you are a part of that movie, you could do worse than moving to – and spending your days drifting though – lovely Old West Austin’s vintage record stores, thrift shops, blues bars, and hip locavore restaurants. The ‘old’ part of the neighborhood’s name tells a big part of the story – it is one of the oldest areas in Austin, and its historic housing stock is protected by landmark laws. In part because of its location just west of downtown, Old West Austin also has a reputation for being a place that younger people, often just out of college, gravitate to, but if you talk to the locals and look art the numbers you’ll find a different story.

While Old West Austin is a great fit for young singles, it really shines as family neighborhood. A large majority of residents say that it’s safe for kids to play outside, which isn’t true of many nearby areas. They also agree that neighbors are friendly, holiday spirit abounds, dogs are loved, and it is safe to walk through at night. While virtually everyone agrees that you’ll need a car, 98% say parking is easy, and once you are in the neighborhood and looking for evening or weekend activities, you won’t need it much: 96% say grocery shopping is an easy walk, and 88% say the same of dining out. Parks, playground and hiking and biking trails abound. As one enthused resident puts it: “Dogs, people, location is great! Really special place that I can’t imagine living elsewhere! Never moving!”





Residents get a taste of Old West Austin in this rustic establishment.

If you want to get a taste of Old West Austin, here are some spots to check out:

  • Best vintage soda fountain: Grab a burger and a shake at Nau’s Enfield Drug’s vintage lunch counter in the back of a pharmacy
  • Best beer and wine bar: Chill out on the patio at Mean Eyed Cat
  • Best beach: Rent a kayak, ride a bike, or just catch a tan at Ladybird Lake-Lamar Beach Metro Park
  • Best bookstore: Bookpeople is a locally owned classic
  • Best record store: Waterloo Records is the indie record store of your Slacker-inspired dreams
  • Best Locavore restaurant: Get a reservation at Wink, a neighborhood institution
  • Best coffee spot: Caffe Medici

Locals kayaking and paddle boarding in Old West Austin

Check out homes in Old West Austin

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What Locals Love About Allandale

Best for: Families looking for suburban amenities with a dash of Austin weird

This affluent north-central Austin neighborhood has everything a professional family might need: good schools, a wide variety of single-family homes on good-sized lots, parks and easy access to shopping an amenities. But it’s still Austin – and that means that there aren’t just Walmarts (although there is one of those) – there are also plenty of vibe-y bars, shops, and locavore restaurants. The neighborhood is also well served by public transportation, and sporty commuters have the option of a bike path that takes you all the way downtown. And if you talk to the locals and look at the numbers, you’ll understand why this is such a special place to live.

Everything a growing family might care about are the areas in which Allandale excels. More than 80% say that kids are safe to play outside – a high number for Austin. More than 95% say that yards are well-tended, parking is a breeze, and dogs are loved. More than 90% love the sidewalks and walkable grocery shopping. And a large majority say they are in for the long haul – with 79% saying they plan to remain in the area for at least five years. As one resident puts it, “I love this area! It’s close to everything and still secluded from the hustle of the city. The neighbors are super friendly.”


Austin Spider Tree



Allandale keeps Austin weird with their Austin Spider Tree.

If you’re considering Allandale, here are some neighborhood highlights to consider:

  • Best donuts: Gourdough’s has a wide variety of sweet treats
  • Best tiny pies: Tiny Pies bakes sweet and savory personal-sized pies
  • Best Mexican-Korean fusion: Get Korean barbecue in a taco at Chi’lantro
  • Best outdoor hang: Yard Bar is a dog-friendly spot for local beers and bites
  • Best Park: Sheffield Northwest Park’s playgrounds, lake, and tennis courts are the heart of the neighborhood
  • Best refurbished gas station: Phil’s Ice House, where you can grab a solid burger

A main street in Allandale

Check out homes in Allandale

View homes

The post What Locals Love About Their Austin Neighborhoods appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

Does Your Neighbors’ Age Influence Your Home Value?

You may never have thought of housing in this way, but exploring the ages of the people where you live—or where you want to move—can give you a high level sense of potential homebuying opportunities. Small towns across America have experienced rapid outmigration. And the main reason? Jobs. Young, working-age people are moving where the jobs are and buying up affordable housing in these popular places. In other words, your friend who is having a hard time finding an apartment in San Francisco is committed to the place because it’s an area where industry reigns.

This is where age enters the picture. The majority of the population in growing, high-industry areas are 20- to 64-years-old. The places that have been abandoned by outmigration — so much so that they will pay you to move there — tend to skew 65 and older. Basically showing that wherever young, working-age people are moving, housing is, or will be, in higher demand and therefore less affordable.

To illustrate this, we created a map breaking down the country by age and median home value. After looking closely at the top 100 metros, the three counties with the highest working-age population are home to top industries and also have housing affordability issues: Arlington and Alexandria, VA and San Francisco, CA. It makes sense, doesn’t it? Arlington and Alexandria are two of the most popular counties for homeowners commuting into Washington DC. They have high housing demand and home values well above the national median ($672,700 in Arlington as opposed to $217,300 nationally). And San Francisco? It goes without saying, but let’s say it anyway: San Francisco dominates the tech space with the largest population in their wage-earning prime, and its median home value is $1,359,000.

As the population in these areas deal with a housing crisis, the areas they have left behind are becoming more creative in recruiting them back. Places like Baltimore are literally paying people to move there. And it’s interesting to note that the cities where your paycheck goes a long way, tend to be in communities with less working-age people. If owning a home is still your American dream, that dream may be better fulfilled looking into places whose populations are under 20 and over 64 years of age.

Take a look at the map above and see what you find.

For the full report, click here.

Methodology

We used a ternary coloring scheme to map three sets of ages—young (0-19 years), working age (20-64) and elderly (65 and over). Each county is represented by a color mixture determined by its distance from the national age structure. This map is inspired by work done by Kashnitsky, I., & Schöley, J. (2018). Regional population structures at a glance. The Lancet, 392(10143), 209–210., and makes use of their code, published here.

Median home values by county are based on Trulia estimates. We use the Census Bureau’s 2010 and 2017 population estimates by age.

The post Does Your Neighbors’ Age Influence Your Home Value? appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

Does Your Neighbors’ Age Influence Your Home Value?

You may never have thought of housing in this way, but exploring the ages of the people where you live—or where you want to move—can give you a high level sense of potential homebuying opportunities. Small towns across America have experienced rapid outmigration. And the main reason? Jobs. Young, working-age people are moving where the jobs are and buying up affordable housing in these popular places. In other words, your friend who is having a hard time finding an apartment in San Francisco is committed to the place because it’s an area where industry reigns.

This is where age enters the picture. The majority of the population in growing, high-industry areas are 20- to 64-years-old. The places that have been abandoned by outmigration — so much so that they will pay you to move there — tend to skew 65 and older. Basically showing that wherever young, working-age people are moving, housing is, or will be, in higher demand and therefore less affordable.

To illustrate this, we created a map breaking down the country by age and median home value. After looking closely at the top 100 metros, the three counties with the highest working-age population are home to top industries and also have housing affordability issues: Arlington and Alexandria, VA and San Francisco, CA. It makes sense, doesn’t it? Arlington and Alexandria are two of the most popular counties for homeowners commuting into Washington DC. They have high housing demand and home values well above the national median ($672,700 in Arlington as opposed to $217,300 nationally). And San Francisco? It goes without saying, but let’s say it anyway: San Francisco dominates the tech space with the largest population in their wage-earning prime, and its median home value is $1,359,000.

As the population in these areas deal with a housing crisis, the areas they have left behind are becoming more creative in recruiting them back. Places like Baltimore are literally paying people to move there. And it’s interesting to note that the cities where your paycheck goes a long way, tend to be in communities with less working-age people. If owning a home is still your American dream, that dream may be better fulfilled looking into places whose populations are under 20 and over 64 years of age.

Take a look at the map above and see what you find.

For the full report, click here.

Methodology

We used a ternary coloring scheme to map three sets of ages—young (0-19 years), working age (20-64) and elderly (65 and over). Each county is represented by a color mixture determined by its distance from the national age structure. This map is inspired by work done by Kashnitsky, I., & Schöley, J. (2018). Regional population structures at a glance. The Lancet, 392(10143), 209–210., and makes use of their code, published here.

Median home values by county are based on Trulia estimates. We use the Census Bureau’s 2010 and 2017 population estimates by age.

The post Does Your Neighbors’ Age Influence Your Home Value? appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

Does Your Neighbors’ Age Influence Your Home Value?

You may never have thought of housing in this way, but exploring the ages of the people where you live—or where you want to move—can give you a high level sense of potential homebuying opportunities. Small towns across America have experienced rapid outmigration. And the main reason? Jobs. Young, working-age people are moving where the jobs are and buying up affordable housing in these popular places. In other words, your friend who is having a hard time finding an apartment in San Francisco is committed to the place because it’s an area where industry reigns.

This is where age enters the picture. The majority of the population in growing, high-industry areas are 20- to 64-years-old. The places that have been abandoned by outmigration — so much so that they will pay you to move there — tend to skew 65 and older. Basically showing that wherever young, working-age people are moving, housing is, or will be, in higher demand and therefore less affordable.

To illustrate this, we created a map breaking down the country by age and median home value. After looking closely at the top 100 metros, the three counties with the highest working-age population are home to top industries and also have housing affordability issues: Arlington and Alexandria, VA and San Francisco, CA. It makes sense, doesn’t it? Arlington and Alexandria are two of the most popular counties for homeowners commuting into Washington DC. They have high housing demand and home values well above the national median ($672,700 in Arlington as opposed to $217,300 nationally). And San Francisco? It goes without saying, but let’s say it anyway: San Francisco dominates the tech space with the largest population in their wage-earning prime, and its median home value is $1,359,000.

As the population in these areas deal with a housing crisis, the areas they have left behind are becoming more creative in recruiting them back. Places like Baltimore are literally paying people to move there. And it’s interesting to note that the cities where your paycheck goes a long way, tend to be in communities with less working-age people. If owning a home is still your American dream, that dream may be better fulfilled looking into places whose populations are under 20 and over 64 years of age.

Take a look at the map above and see what you find.

For the full report, click here.

Methodology

We used a ternary coloring scheme to map three sets of ages—young (0-19 years), working age (20-64) and elderly (65 and over). Each county is represented by a color mixture determined by its distance from the national age structure. This map is inspired by work done by Kashnitsky, I., & Schöley, J. (2018). Regional population structures at a glance. The Lancet, 392(10143), 209–210., and makes use of their code, published here.

Median home values by county are based on Trulia estimates. We use the Census Bureau’s 2010 and 2017 population estimates by age.

The post Does Your Neighbors’ Age Influence Your Home Value? appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

We Graded College Housing Data, and Off-campus Gets an A for Affordability

Let’s face it, college is expensive these days. No matter where you go to school, the price of tuition, fees, books, and transportation add up. But there’s one place that you might be able to save big: housing. Trulia economists crunched the numbers behind housing affordability on the biggest campuses in America to compare on- and off-campus living spaces.

The results were nothing short of surprising. While rents are rising, so is the price of living on campus. “In 28 of the 48 places we looked at, it was either the same price or cheaper to be off-campus with an average savings of $219 per month with a roommate,” says Trulia economist Felipe Chacon.

Where can you find the best deals? Read on.

Tallahassee, Florida

On-campus: $875 ~ Off-campus: $593

Florida’s capital city is home to two major universities: Florida State University and Florida A&M. Yet, it’s not the typical Florida spot. You’re about a half hour from the closest beach, and the city is on the smaller side. (Some areas, like those near the A&M campus, feel downright rural.)

In College Town, the neighborhood that borders FSU, residents are paying more for rent than they used to. Rent went up 6 percent between 2012 and 2018. But they’re still saving $282 a month by opting for off-campus housing for $593 a month compared to $875 on campus.

You can make your budget go further if you want to hang out on W. Gaines Street, the popular entertainment district for the college crowd. Between the free concerts offered at the amphitheater at Cascades Park and value menu at Gumby’s Pizza, you can have fun on the cheap in Tallahassee.

Check out homes and neighborhoods in Tallahassee

See what’s available


 

 

Madison, Wisconsin

On-campus: $866 ~ Off-campus: $865

Home to the University of Wisconsin – Madison, this popular Midwestern city has experienced a boom in the tech, healthcare, and manufacturing industries in recent years, creating plenty of career options—and competition for housing. Overall, rents have increased by 9.5 percent between 2012 and 2018. The hot rental market all but erases the difference between on- and off-campus housing: At $865 for off-campus rental and $866 for campus housing, you can make your decision by flipping a coin.

You can almost see the split between students and professionals by a visit to two popular streets: Monroe Street, which has Trader Joe’s and boutique restaurants, and Regent Street, where you’ll find pubs and pizza joints. But in either location, you can enjoy a little more grown-up living than in many student-heavy neighborhoods. Both Madison’s Regent and Dudgeon-Monroe rate high for safety, tidy yards, walkability, and dog-friendliness.

Check out homes and neighborhoods in Madison

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Gainesville, Florida

On-campus: $641 ~ Off-campus: $687

With a campus made up of more than 150 research centers and institutes, not to mention a popular sports program, the University of Florida is the backbone of Gainesville. Rents have increased by an incredible 18.4 percent between 2012 and 2018, and the types of rentals available off-campus tend to include more standalone homes instead of big apartment complexes. Sharing your part of a two-bedroom would cost $641 on average. When compared to the on-campus estimate of $687 (which doesn’t include food), it costs you $46 more per month.

There are other perks to off-campus living if you’re in the College Park neighborhood; locals say it’s easy to find parking, walkable to things to do, quiet, and 100 percent say they feel comfortable walking alone at night there.

Check out homes and neighborhoods in Gainesville

See what’s available


 

 

College Station, Texas

On-campus: $875 ~ Off-campus: $760

As you can guess by the name, College Station, the home of Texas A&M University, is positively packed with students. Nearly half of the population is in college (44.9 percent), which explains why the median age here is 24. The University also is the city’s largest employer, creating plenty of post-grad employment opportunities—which could contribute to rents going up 16.8 percent between 2012 and 2018.

Still, those market rates are a good deal for students. If you’re looking to stay off-campus, your part of a two-bedroom rental would cost $760 versus $875 on-campus (without food), saving you $115 per month.

One unique aspect of the off-campus housing search in College Station is that there are buildings that are designated for student living and structure their properties accordingly. For instance, Rise at Northgate, a luxury community that’s practically on-campus, charges by the bed instead of the unit. Also, keep in mind that College Station’s Texas climate isn’t exactly amenable to walking outside (only 1 percent commute by foot), so calculate in transportation costs.

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Tempe, Arizona

On-campus: $861 ~ Off-campus: $825

Tempe is home to Arizona State University, a surprisingly lush campus surrounded by an arboretum downtown. Like many of the cities on our list, rent has trended upward between 2012 and 2018, increasing by 18.2 percent. Your part of an off-campus two-bedroom would set you back $825 versus $861 on campus (without food), which saves you $36 per month.

Of course, newer apartments in the city’s more modern complexes near campus are priced far higher, but looking slightly to the east of campus will yield more affordable rents. A two-bedroom apartment at The Hyve is $1,448 (or $724 per roommate) and is about a half a mile east of campus. And the lower prices don’t mean compromising on lifestyle; the modern finishes and luxury amenities like a pool and gym prove there are great off-campus deals to be found in Tempe.

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

On-campus: $1,222 ~ Off-campus: $1,193

The University of Michigan is one of the top-ranked universities in the world, and its home of Ann Arbor was declared the “Best College Town in the U.S.” in 2018 by Forbes, so it’s no wonder demand for housing is so high in this relatively small Midwestern city. Rents increased 14.3 percent between 2012 and 2018, and they were pretty high to begin with. The biggest change has come to two-bedrooms (they’ve increased by 33 percent). Your part of a two-bedroom would be $1,193 versus $1,222 on campus (including food) for a difference of only $29.

The good news for on-campus living in Ann Arbor is that the university and city are super close together. That means you’re right in the middle of the same arts, food, and culture everyone living in the uber-expensive Kerrytown and South University neighborhoods enjoys—unless your dorm is on North Campus, which is, admittedly, a hike from downtown. If you’re looking for a deal, rental prices go down the closer you get to nearby Ypsilanti, where the median rent drops by more than a third, but note that you’re in for a long bus ride to campus.

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Provo, Utah

On-campus: $417 ~ Off-campus: $693

Thanks to Brigham Young University, this scenic mountain city hasn’t escaped the trend of higher rents in college towns. Provo‘s rents increased 22.4 percent between 2012 and 2018. Young families and college students could be making two-bedrooms particularly in demand, as these units have increased in price by 24 percent. As a result, your part of the rent on a two-bedroom would be $693 versus $417 for on-campus housing. Opting to stay on-campus would save you $276 per month.

But if you have your heart set on off-campus life, consider focusing your search on Joaquin, the neighborhood bordering the south side of Brigham Young University. Here, locals praise the walkability, holiday spirit, and dog-friendliness, and you can rent a two-bedroom home for $875 total. Overall, it’s an affordable, family-friendly area that feels a bit different than other college cities.

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Bloomington, Indiana

On-campus: $774 ~ Off-campus: $733

The home of the University of Indiana – Bloomington feels like a small town, despite its 80,000 residents. Life revolves around the academic calendar, and there’s a petite downtown tailored to appeal to college budgets with affordable cafes, fast-food restaurants, coffee shops, and pubs. Bloomington is the rare entry on our list where the rent has actually decreased between 2012 and 2018, at a rate of -4.7 percent. The savings between off- and on-campus housing can differ, but on average, you’ll pay $733 for your half of a two-bedroom off-campus compared to $774 on-campus (without food).

Looking in the 47403 zip, which covers the walkable neighborhood Prospect Hill, can yield the biggest off-campus rental bargains—but watch out for added expenses. “Estimated utilities for a 2-bedroom unit in this area could cost upwards of $250 per month though, completely wiping out any savings,” Chacon says. “On top of that, most apartments in this zip code though are not very close to the university.”

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Berkeley, California

On-campus: $1,861 ~ Off-campus: $2,263

The University of California – Berkeley is another of the highest-ranking universities on the globe, and it has plenty of other things going for it, too: The campus is gorgeous, the weather is always great, and it’s right next to downtown Berkeley (home to some of the best food in the entire country).

A low cost of living, however, isn’t one of the benefits of living in this college city. Rents are very, very high, increasing a whopping 43.5 percent on average between 2012 and 2018. Your part of a two-bedroom is a steep $2,263 versus the on-campus cost of $1,861 (without food). Though both figures are the highest on our list, on-campus is still $402 cheaper.

Want to save more? Get ready for a commute. “To get anywhere near the on-campus rate, two roommates would have to look south 10 miles to Oakland‘s 94621, or 5 miles north to El Cerrito‘s 94530, which would cost $1,696 and $1,875, respectively, before utilities and transit costs,” says Chacon.

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Fort Collins, Colorado

On-campus: $1,444 ~ Off-campus: $1,026

Fort Collins is home to University of Colorado, as well as picture-perfect natural features like waterfalls and mountains. Rents in the highly livable community have increased 24.6 percent between 2012 and 2018, though you still might be able to save a few bucks by living off-campus. Your portion of the rent for a two-bedroom costs, on average, $1,026 compared to the estimated on-campus cost of $1,444 per month (a figure that does include food, however).

The $418 you’ll save living off-campus will cover plenty of visits to Totally ’80s Pizza, home to the only ’80s museum in the world. Wondering where to look for your new, affordable place? Try Old Prospect, a neighborhood across South College Avenue from the University of Colorado. It’s just a short bike ride away from the Old Town historic district, where you can browse shops in restored 1800s buildings. Some even compare the quaint area to Disneyland’s Main Street U.S.A.

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Thinking of living off-campus?​

Here’s our cheat sheet for getting the most value for your dollar:

  • Consider the price of utilities and meals. On-campus housing often bundles these costs in, while off-campus usually means everyone fends for themselves in those areas. In regions with more extreme weather, expect to pay a lot more for utilities in drafty rentals.
  • Factor in travel expenses. An off-campus bargain might not save you that much in the long run if you have to commute a long distance and budget for gas and parking (and parking tickets). If public transit is available, note how long the route between your rental and campus is before committing.
  • Keep lease length in mind. While some off-campus units might offer academic year leases, others might charge a lease-breaking fee or another penalty if you live there less than the full 12 months. Also, if you do have a 12-month lease, divide the year’s total rent by 9 to reflect the actual price of living for an academic year.

Methodology

In picking our college towns, we looked at census-defined places with at least 45,000 people as of the 2016 5-year ACS in which at least 20 percent of the population identified as enrolled in college or graduate school. Estimates for on-campus housing costs were obtained directly from the websites of the largest college or university in each of these places and we excluded the cost of meals when possible. When not explicitly stated, the cost for a full academic year (9 months) of on-campus housing was calculated either based on monthly, or per semester rates given.

To compare on-campus housing costs with off-campus market rates, we took the median estimated 12-month rent cost of all 2-bedroom units in an area, divided it between 2roommates, and divided it out over 9 months to match the academic year. So, for example, if the median rent of a 2-bedroom unit were $600 per month, that would be $7,200 for a year. Spread out over 9-months instead of 12 though, that works out to $800 per month and divided by 2 people is $400 per month.

This was done for both the cities where these colleges and universities are situated as well asthe zip codes of the surrounding area.

What are your favorite money-saving tips for getting the most out of your on- or off-campus budget? Let us know in the comments!

The post We Graded College Housing Data, and Off-campus Gets an A for Affordability appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

We Graded College Housing Data, and Off-campus Gets an A for Affordability

Let’s face it, college is expensive these days. No matter where you go to school, the price of tuition, fees, books, and transportation add up. But there’s one place that you might be able to save big: housing. Trulia economists crunched the numbers behind housing affordability on the biggest campuses in America to compare on- and off-campus living spaces.

The results were nothing short of surprising. While rents are rising, so is the price of living on campus. “In 28 of the 48 places we looked at, it was either the same price or cheaper to be off-campus with an average savings of $219 per month with a roommate,” says Trulia economist Felipe Chacon.

Where can you find the best deals? Read on.

Tallahassee, Florida

On-campus: $875 ~ Off-campus: $593

Florida’s capital city is home to two major universities: Florida State University and Florida A&M. Yet, it’s not the typical Florida spot. You’re about a half hour from the closest beach, and the city is on the smaller side. (Some areas, like those near the A&M campus, feel downright rural.)

In College Town, the neighborhood that borders FSU, residents are paying more for rent than they used to. Rent went up 6 percent between 2012 and 2018. But they’re still saving $282 a month by opting for off-campus housing for $593 a month compared to $875 on campus.

You can make your budget go further if you want to hang out on W. Gaines Street, the popular entertainment district for the college crowd. Between the free concerts offered at the amphitheater at Cascades Park and value menu at Gumby’s Pizza, you can have fun on the cheap in Tallahassee.

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Madison, Wisconsin

On-campus: $866 ~ Off-campus: $865

Home to the University of Wisconsin – Madison, this popular Midwestern city has experienced a boom in the tech, healthcare, and manufacturing industries in recent years, creating plenty of career options—and competition for housing. Overall, rents have increased by 9.5 percent between 2012 and 2018. The hot rental market all but erases the difference between on- and off-campus housing: At $865 for off-campus rental and $866 for campus housing, you can make your decision by flipping a coin.

You can almost see the split between students and professionals by a visit to two popular streets: Monroe Street, which has Trader Joe’s and boutique restaurants, and Regent Street, where you’ll find pubs and pizza joints. But in either location, you can enjoy a little more grown-up living than in many student-heavy neighborhoods. Both Madison’s Regent and Dudgeon-Monroe rate high for safety, tidy yards, walkability, and dog-friendliness.

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Gainesville, Florida

On-campus: $641 ~ Off-campus: $687

With a campus made up of more than 150 research centers and institutes, not to mention a popular sports program, the University of Florida is the backbone of Gainesville. Rents have increased by an incredible 18.4 percent between 2012 and 2018, and the types of rentals available off-campus tend to include more standalone homes instead of big apartment complexes. Sharing your part of a two-bedroom would cost $641 on average. When compared to the on-campus estimate of $687 (which doesn’t include food), it costs you $46 more per month.

There are other perks to off-campus living if you’re in the College Park neighborhood; locals say it’s easy to find parking, walkable to things to do, quiet, and 100 percent say they feel comfortable walking alone at night there.

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College Station, Texas

On-campus: $875 ~ Off-campus: $760

As you can guess by the name, College Station, the home of Texas A&M University, is positively packed with students. Nearly half of the population is in college (44.9 percent), which explains why the median age here is 24. The University also is the city’s largest employer, creating plenty of post-grad employment opportunities—which could contribute to rents going up 16.8 percent between 2012 and 2018.

Still, those market rates are a good deal for students. If you’re looking to stay off-campus, your part of a two-bedroom rental would cost $760 versus $875 on-campus (without food), saving you $115 per month.

One unique aspect of the off-campus housing search in College Station is that there are buildings that are designated for student living and structure their properties accordingly. For instance, Rise at Northgate, a luxury community that’s practically on-campus, charges by the bed instead of the unit. Also, keep in mind that College Station’s Texas climate isn’t exactly amenable to walking outside (only 1 percent commute by foot), so calculate in transportation costs.

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Tempe, Arizona

On-campus: $861 ~ Off-campus: $825

Tempe is home to Arizona State University, a surprisingly lush campus surrounded by an arboretum downtown. Like many of the cities on our list, rent has trended upward between 2012 and 2018, increasing by 18.2 percent. Your part of an off-campus two-bedroom would set you back $825 versus $861 on campus (without food), which saves you $36 per month.

Of course, newer apartments in the city’s more modern complexes near campus are priced far higher, but looking slightly to the east of campus will yield more affordable rents. A two-bedroom apartment at The Hyve is $1,448 (or $724 per roommate) and is about a half a mile east of campus. And the lower prices don’t mean compromising on lifestyle; the modern finishes and luxury amenities like a pool and gym prove there are great off-campus deals to be found in Tempe.

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

On-campus: $1,222 ~ Off-campus: $1,193

The University of Michigan is one of the top-ranked universities in the world, and its home of Ann Arbor was declared the “Best College Town in the U.S.” in 2018 by Forbes, so it’s no wonder demand for housing is so high in this relatively small Midwestern city. Rents increased 14.3 percent between 2012 and 2018, and they were pretty high to begin with. The biggest change has come to two-bedrooms (they’ve increased by 33 percent). Your part of a two-bedroom would be $1,193 versus $1,222 on campus (including food) for a difference of only $29.

The good news for on-campus living in Ann Arbor is that the university and city are super close together. That means you’re right in the middle of the same arts, food, and culture everyone living in the uber-expensive Kerrytown and South University neighborhoods enjoys—unless your dorm is on North Campus, which is, admittedly, a hike from downtown. If you’re looking for a deal, rental prices go down the closer you get to nearby Ypsilanti, where the median rent drops by more than a third, but note that you’re in for a long bus ride to campus.

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Provo, Utah

On-campus: $417 ~ Off-campus: $693

Thanks to Brigham Young University, this scenic mountain city hasn’t escaped the trend of higher rents in college towns. Provo‘s rents increased 22.4 percent between 2012 and 2018. Young families and college students could be making two-bedrooms particularly in demand, as these units have increased in price by 24 percent. As a result, your part of the rent on a two-bedroom would be $693 versus $417 for on-campus housing. Opting to stay on-campus would save you $276 per month.

But if you have your heart set on off-campus life, consider focusing your search on Joaquin, the neighborhood bordering the south side of Brigham Young University. Here, locals praise the walkability, holiday spirit, and dog-friendliness, and you can rent a two-bedroom home for $875 total. Overall, it’s an affordable, family-friendly area that feels a bit different than other college cities.

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Bloomington, Indiana

On-campus: $774 ~ Off-campus: $733

The home of the University of Indiana – Bloomington feels like a small town, despite its 80,000 residents. Life revolves around the academic calendar, and there’s a petite downtown tailored to appeal to college budgets with affordable cafes, fast-food restaurants, coffee shops, and pubs. Bloomington is the rare entry on our list where the rent has actually decreased between 2012 and 2018, at a rate of -4.7 percent. The savings between off- and on-campus housing can differ, but on average, you’ll pay $733 for your half of a two-bedroom off-campus compared to $774 on-campus (without food).

Looking in the 47403 zip, which covers the walkable neighborhood Prospect Hill, can yield the biggest off-campus rental bargains—but watch out for added expenses. “Estimated utilities for a 2-bedroom unit in this area could cost upwards of $250 per month though, completely wiping out any savings,” Chacon says. “On top of that, most apartments in this zip code though are not very close to the university.”

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Berkeley, California

On-campus: $1,861 ~ Off-campus: $2,263

The University of California – Berkeley is another of the highest-ranking universities on the globe, and it has plenty of other things going for it, too: The campus is gorgeous, the weather is always great, and it’s right next to downtown Berkeley (home to some of the best food in the entire country).

A low cost of living, however, isn’t one of the benefits of living in this college city. Rents are very, very high, increasing a whopping 43.5 percent on average between 2012 and 2018. Your part of a two-bedroom is a steep $2,263 versus the on-campus cost of $1,861 (without food). Though both figures are the highest on our list, on-campus is still $402 cheaper.

Want to save more? Get ready for a commute. “To get anywhere near the on-campus rate, two roommates would have to look south 10 miles to Oakland‘s 94621, or 5 miles north to El Cerrito‘s 94530, which would cost $1,696 and $1,875, respectively, before utilities and transit costs,” says Chacon.

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Fort Collins, Colorado

On-campus: $1,444 ~ Off-campus: $1,026

Fort Collins is home to University of Colorado, as well as picture-perfect natural features like waterfalls and mountains. Rents in the highly livable community have increased 24.6 percent between 2012 and 2018, though you still might be able to save a few bucks by living off-campus. Your portion of the rent for a two-bedroom costs, on average, $1,026 compared to the estimated on-campus cost of $1,444 per month (a figure that does include food, however).

The $418 you’ll save living off-campus will cover plenty of visits to Totally ’80s Pizza, home to the only ’80s museum in the world. Wondering where to look for your new, affordable place? Try Old Prospect, a neighborhood across South College Avenue from the University of Colorado. It’s just a short bike ride away from the Old Town historic district, where you can browse shops in restored 1800s buildings. Some even compare the quaint area to Disneyland’s Main Street U.S.A.

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Thinking of living off-campus?​

Here’s our cheat sheet for getting the most value for your dollar:

  • Consider the price of utilities and meals. On-campus housing often bundles these costs in, while off-campus usually means everyone fends for themselves in those areas. In regions with more extreme weather, expect to pay a lot more for utilities in drafty rentals.
  • Factor in travel expenses. An off-campus bargain might not save you that much in the long run if you have to commute a long distance and budget for gas and parking (and parking tickets). If public transit is available, note how long the route between your rental and campus is before committing.
  • Keep lease length in mind. While some off-campus units might offer academic year leases, others might charge a lease-breaking fee or another penalty if you live there less than the full 12 months. Also, if you do have a 12-month lease, divide the year’s total rent by 9 to reflect the actual price of living for an academic year.

Methodology

In picking our college towns, we looked at census-defined places with at least 45,000 people as of the 2016 5-year ACS in which at least 20 percent of the population identified as enrolled in college or graduate school. Estimates for on-campus housing costs were obtained directly from the websites of the largest college or university in each of these places and we excluded the cost of meals when possible. When not explicitly stated, the cost for a full academic year (9 months) of on-campus housing was calculated either based on monthly, or per semester rates given.

To compare on-campus housing costs with off-campus market rates, we took the median estimated 12-month rent cost of all 2-bedroom units in an area, divided it between 2roommates, and divided it out over 9 months to match the academic year. So, for example, if the median rent of a 2-bedroom unit were $600 per month, that would be $7,200 for a year. Spread out over 9-months instead of 12 though, that works out to $800 per month and divided by 2 people is $400 per month.

This was done for both the cities where these colleges and universities are situated as well asthe zip codes of the surrounding area.

What are your favorite money-saving tips for getting the most out of your on- or off-campus budget? Let us know in the comments!

The post We Graded College Housing Data, and Off-campus Gets an A for Affordability appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

The Most Expensive Condos in America

If you won the lottery, where would you move? While some might dream of a sprawling country estate, others would head their favorite metropolis for urban luxury living. If the latter sounds like your #lottogoals, we’ve rounded up the top 25 most expensive condos in America to fuel your jackpot fantasies. From a huge New York City duplex that comes with a trip to outer space to a sculptural Seattle space with mountain views, here’s a glimpse inside the most luxurious condos in the nation.

New York 1 Most expensive condos

1. Massive Hell’s Kitchen Duplex With Very Unusual Amenities

$85,000,000

Don’t mistake “condo” with “short on space” — especially when it comes to the most expensive condo in New York. This 15,000-square-foot duplex at the Atelier has enough living space across a floor and a half to comfortably accommodate your family and your entourage (10 bedrooms and 11 bathrooms, to be exact). Oh, and if the bird’s-eye view of the Hudson River isn’t enough for you, know that this condo also comes with two tickets for a future trip to outer space (yup).

 

New York 2 Most expensive condos

2. Full-floor Penthouse in Midtown’s Most Unusual Building

$82,000,000

If your idea of luxury is never having to see (or hear) a neighbor, this six-bedroom, eight-bathroom penthouse that comes with its own private elevator would be perfect for you. The 8,255-square-foot condo occupies an entire floor of one of New York City’s slimmest skyscrapers, a set-up that also gives you 360-degree views of the city. Fun fact: This condo is higher than the Empire State Building, a sight that you’ll marvel at from the nearly floor-to-ceiling windows.

 

New York 3 Most expensive condos

3. Magazine-worthy Loft in an Artsy Neighborhood

$65,000,000

With its art galleries and thriving dining scene, SoHo has long been the neighborhood of choice for the lovers of culture. Slightly more down-to-earth architecture is the norm in SoHo — like the five-story building where you’ll find this updated four-bedroom, seven-bathroom updated condo. Every inch was redesigned by Roman & Williams, the interior design firm that counts celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow and Kate Hudson among its clientele. But, the best features are outside: There are approximately seven terraces (one with a TV alcove) and a rear yard.

 

Philadelphia 1 Most expensive condos

4. Customizable Condo Near a City Landmark

$14,000,000

Old meets new at this 9,515-square-foot penthouse at the sleek Ritz-Carlton Residences. It’s located right across the street from Philadelphia’s most beautiful structures — the wedding cake-like City Hall. This is a condo building with all the perks of a luxury hotel, from the ability to order room service from the Ritz-Carlton whenever the whim strikes, to the use of a chauffeured car. However, the design and features of the penthouse itself are entirely up to you. Go ahead, dream big.

 

Most-Expensive-Condos-Philadelphia-PA

5. Sleek New Construction in a Historic Neighborhood

$6,959,000

History abounds in Philadelphia, especially in the area of Society Hill. That’s where you’ll find Independence Hall, the site where the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were signed and adopted. Steps away is the brand new 500 Walnut residential tower, home to a 4,300-square-foot condo that comes with its own architect so you can put your own spin on the space. Before you move in, give yourself a housewarming gift of an electric car — one of the building’s many amenities is an induction-powered charging pad that’ll charge up your battery sans plug.

 

Most expensive condos Philadelphia 3

6. Bright and Airy Condo Built for Entertaining

$5,800,000

The Rittenhouse Square neighborhood is a bit quieter than other parts of the city, with upscale boutiques and restaurants alongside handsome, old townhomes. You’d have a great view of it all from this warm and inviting four-bedroom, three-bathroom condo. Though it’s already a roomy 4,166 square feet, the unit also has a private terrace off the dining room that’s big enough for entertaining. Rainy? Take the party back indoors to your own private screening room.

 

Boston 1 Most expensive condos

7. Ultra-modern Penthouse that Blends Indoor and Outdoor Living

$18,000,000

Though it’s technically a condo, this four-bedroom, five-bathroom residence is more like a sky mansion. Found at the very top of the Archer, the penthouse looks a lot like the kind of sleek, flat-roofed luxury homes usually found in Los Angeles. The design approach does feel a bit Hollywood as well, with 5,998-square-foot interior living space opening up (via floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors) to more than 2,326 square feet of outdoor space. Yes, there’s a pool and hot tub out there, too.

 

Boston 2 Most expensive condos

8. Opulent Flat in a Historic Mansion

$15,995,000

If your taste in architecture favors the more traditional, Boston isn’t short on grand old homes that date back to the 1800s. This four-bedroom, six-bath condo in a circa-1852 estate gives you all the benefits of historic mansion living, with an updated interior that suits a more modern lifestyle. Meaning, the kitchen and baths are huge, but you still have old-timey details to appreciate, like a solarium. While you may not have a yard, you do have the Boston Public Garden outside your front door.

 

Boston 3 Most expensive condos

9. Sunny Condo Near Boston’s Best Shopping

$13,500,000

With its “front-to-back” layout, this high-up three-bedroom, four-bathroom residence is the very, very upscale take on a railroad apartment. All the rooms flow together, so the natural light from the floor-to-ceiling windows shines throughout the entire condo. It comes pre-decorated by the renowned interior designer William Hodgins, who popularized open, uncluttered designs. That means you won’t need to shop at the boutiques found below on Boston’s iconic shopping stretch Newbury Street to fill your home with beautiful things — but hey, why not do it anyway?

 

San Francisco 1 Most expensive condos

10. Gallery-like Residence with Unbeatable Views

$14,750,000

With its elaborate columns and carvings, the entryway of this luxury condo building might lead you to believe the interiors will be similarly ornate. You’d be very wrong. The four-bedroom, three-and-a-half bathroom penthouse has a more minimalist aesthetic, reminiscent of an art gallery. It puts the focus on the cityscape you’ll enjoy from every window. There’s no better way to see the Golden Gate Bridge, Alcatraz, the Marin Headlands, and the Bay Bridge all at once.

 

Most expensive condos San Francisco 2

11. Worldly Two-bedroom in a Groundbreaking Building

$14,500,000

The 181 Fremont might have taken more than five years to complete, but this gleaming condo building was worth the wait. (It has the unusual bragging right of the deepest foundation in the city, setting a new standard for safety.) Here, you’ll find a 3,368-square-foot residence that might set a new trend for interiors. Its eclectic finishes came from all over the world — marble from Italy, Pladao wood doors from New Guinea, and the bronze entry door hardware is from Paris.

 

San Francisco 3 Most expensive condos

12. Elegant Penthouse Surrounded by the City

$11,700,000

Situated 400 feet above Union Square, in this three-bedroom, four-and-a-half-bathroom penthouse you can overlook much of the city from virtually any window. If the tastefully neutral interiors bring to mind those found in a luxury hotel, you’d be correct. That’s because the 3,830-square-foot unit is a Four Seasons Private Residence. It’s kind of like living on vacation.

 

Los Angeles 1 Most expensive condos

13. Double Penthouse with a Bonus Apartment

$48,888,888

Everything’s a bit more over-the-top in the City of Angels, and luxury real estate is no exception. This mid-century tower, located near Beverly Hills, is home to the most expensive condo in the city: a 7,000-square-foot double penthouse with a 3,000-square-foot terrace. It’s the billionaire’s version a “fixer upper” in that it’s currently unfinished. If you have the happy problem of needing somewhere to live while making this your dream penthouse, don’t worry. This property also comes with a one-bedroom apartment and a studio.

 

Los Angeles 2 Most expensive condos

14. Deco-inspired Two-bedroom in the Heart of the City

$29,900,000

If Jay Gatsby lived in modern-day Los Angeles, he’d call this place home. Though this two-bedroom, four-bathroom condo was built in 2010, it’s designed to evoke the glamour of the 1920s and 30s. Each room has a different theme, with mood lighting to match — and the most over-the-top room might be the black-and-gold master bath, complete with coordinating black marble.

 

Los Angeles 3 Most expensive condos

15. Neutral Penthouse Fit for a Style Icon

$16,500,000

Though it’s located inland (between Century City and UCLA), this towering three-bedroom, five-bathroom penthouse is high enough to have views all the way across the city to the ocean. However, the vista isn’t even the most notable feature of this white-and-beige unit, despite the 1,800-square-foot terrace that looks straight from a boutique hotel. Nope, that honor goes to the custom closet. Kitted out with glass doors and a shoe wall, it’s a style-lover’s dream.

 

Seattle 1 Most expensive condos

16. Downtown Condo with Peaceful Mountain Views

$12,500,000

For nature-loving city-dwellers, this condo has it all. This impeccably decorated two-bedroom, three-bathroom flat is a stone’s throw away from Seattle’s famous Pike Place Market, yet looks out onto the gorgeous Puget Sound, Mt. Rainier, and the Olympic Mountains. It’s a view you can enjoy while grilling your farmer’s market catch of the day, thanks to the outdoor barbecue located on one of two terraces.

 

Seattle 3 Most expensive condos

17. Open-concept Penthouse with a Bonus-packed Rooftop

$3,999,000

Sure, views of mountains and sunsets are nice, but sometimes, you just want the ultimate in luxury. This two-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bathroom penthouse is ideal for those whose idea of communing with nature is admiring a countertop made of fine stone. The four-car garage (a rare find in Seattle) can accommodate your fantasy car collection, and the condo building itself will happily secure your wine collection. Take your best bottle up to your private rooftop terrace, which packs in a Viking mini-kitchen, spa, and a fire pit.

 

18. Glass Aerie That Puts the City at Your Feet

When money is no object, you can indulge in fun features that are only for occasional use. For instance, having an unsheltered, open-air hot tub in a city that’s famous for constant rain. This is just what you’ll find off the patio of this two-bedroom, two-bathroom penthouse condo, along with other fair-weather comforts like an outdoor kitchen and fireplace. Most of the year, however, you’d still be able to get the illusion of outdoor living thanks to the glass walls that surround the designer interior with panoramic skyline views.

 

Chicago 2 Most expensive condos

19. Spacious Double Unit Near a Chicago Icon

$11,000,000

It’s two condos for one with this purchase, which adds up to a whole floor to call your own near Willis Tower (aka Sears Tower). When combined, you’ll have a five-bedroom, seven-bathroom residence that totals an impressive 8,200 square feet. As for what to do with all that space, perhaps the layout can offer clues. The condos were designed to have a museum-like presence, making it the perfect home for a burgeoning art collection.

 

Chicago 3 Most expensive condos

20. Designer Condo in an Upcoming Building

$10,368,390

Though it won’t be ready until 2020, Chicago’s third most expensive condo promises to be a standout. The Sky 360 Residences of Vista Tower is going to be the newest addition to the Chicago skyline, and the interiors promise to be as well-designed as the unusual tiered exterior of the building. In this proposed five-bedroom, six-bathroom condo, your future self would get to enjoy motorized kitchen cabinets, full-height stone walls throughout the unit, and a heated bathroom floor that’ll take the chill out of those Chicago winters.

 

21. A Curated 4-Bedroom in an Architectural Masterpiece

When it opens in 2020, the Vista Tower skyscraper will be the third-tallest in the city—and also the tallest structure in the world designed by a woman. It’s the work of Jeanne Gang, who also won a MacArthur Genius Grand in 2011. In other words, living in the future Sky 360 Residents at Vista Tower comes with quite a bit of distinction. That’s before you even get to the impressive four-bedroom, five-bathroom condo you’d call home. Designed by Hirch Bedner Associates (a firm that specializes in five-star hotels), the interior combines stone walls, wide-plank wood floors, and hyper-modern cabinetry and appliances for an unusual mix of natural elements and cutting-edge tech.

 

Houston 1 Most expensive condos

22. Four-bedroom Condo in a Resort-like Building

$7,500,000

The peak of living large in Houston is at the brand-new River Oaks building, where the biggest price tag in the city will buy you a four-bedroom, six-bathroom condo that occupies 6,200 square feet. The 1,700-square-foot terrace gives you even more living space — but if it’s still not enough, that’s where the amenities come in. There are two picturesque pools anchored by contemporary artwork, an outdoor kitchen, and a pet spa with a dog park to let your pup get his energy out in comfort.

23. Custom, Floor-sized Condo with a Formal Garden

$6,736,000

This unfinished, floor-sized condo gives you 9,294-square-feet to design to your specifications, which could accommodate a six-bedroom, six-bathroom condo. There are at least eight areas that likely won’t need a full renovation, though: the eight terraces found on each side of your floor, which just require some luxury lounge furniture. And if you love to look upon perfectly-manicured trees and landscaping, you’re in luck — the building has its own formal gardens.

Houston 3 Most expensive condos

24. Sophisticated Urban Oasis with an Infinity Pool

$4,225,000

A little bit of New York City came to Houston in 2015 in the form of the Arabella, the sister building to luxury high rises in the Big Apple. Here, you’ll find a four-bedroom, six-bathroom condo with of-the-moment design touches like lacquered cabinets. But the ultimate luxury is right off the balcony, in the form of a private pool with soaring views of the city.

 

Most expensive condos Miami 1

25. Glass “House” with Biscayne Bay Views

$25,000,000

If your home was made almost entirely of glass, you’d have to be very strategic with the location to maximize privacy. But in the case of this all-glass, six-bedroom, five-and-a-half bathroom penthouse, you’re so high up that you’re guaranteed privacy. Designed by architect Bjarke Ingels so that no internal structure obscures light, this modern take on a solarium is for the style minimalist with a maximalist budget. In addition to luxe features like a chef’s kitchen, there’s a 3,000-bottle wine room and a rooftop “moonlight cinema.”

 

Miami 2 Most expensive condos

26. All-season Living at an Exclusive Building

$22,000,000

Miami is the rare place where you could have an equal amount of outdoor and interior space and get plenty of year-round use out of each. This five-bedroom, six-bathroom duplex condo splits the difference with 5,000-square-feet of living space and 5,000-square feet of terraces. The high price isn’t just for the amount of room you’ll get, but also due to the exclusivity of the building. At Beach House 8 — with only eight full-floor condos — an opening is a rare find. In addition to your two floors, you’ll find a third level with an infinity pool.

 

Miami 3 Most expensive condos

27. All-white Condo by the Ocean

$21,500,000

Located just north of Miami, Surfside is an upscale neighborhood within the city limits — though it has a less flashy atmosphere. (The mayor has been known to skateboard around town.) The Surf Club Four Seasons is indicative of that luxurious-yet-laid-back vibe, with condos that offer high-end amenities without a lot of over-the-top glitz. This four-bedroom, seven-bathroom furnished condo has an all-white interior that puts the focus on its best feature — an expansive ocean view.

 

Clearly, the most expensive condos in America vary greatly based on price, location, and style. With so many diverse options, which condo would you choose as your dream home? Let us know in the comments!

The post The Most Expensive Condos in America appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

The Most Expensive Condos in America

If you won the lottery, where would you move? While some might dream of a sprawling country estate, others would head their favorite metropolis for urban luxury living. If the latter sounds like your #lottogoals, we’ve rounded up the top 25 most expensive condos in America to fuel your jackpot fantasies. From a huge New York City duplex that comes with a trip to outer space to a sculptural Seattle space with mountain views, here’s a glimpse inside the most luxurious condos in the nation.

New York 1 Most expensive condos

1. Massive Hell’s Kitchen Duplex With Very Unusual Amenities

$85,000,000

Don’t mistake “condo” with “short on space” — especially when it comes to the most expensive condo in New York. This 15,000-square-foot duplex at the Atelier has enough living space across a floor and a half to comfortably accommodate your family and your entourage (10 bedrooms and 11 bathrooms, to be exact). Oh, and if the bird’s-eye view of the Hudson River isn’t enough for you, know that this condo also comes with two tickets for a future trip to outer space (yup).

 

New York 2 Most expensive condos

2. Full-floor Penthouse in Midtown’s Most Unusual Building

$82,000,000

If your idea of luxury is never having to see (or hear) a neighbor, this six-bedroom, eight-bathroom penthouse that comes with its own private elevator would be perfect for you. The 8,255-square-foot condo occupies an entire floor of one of New York City’s slimmest skyscrapers, a set-up that also gives you 360-degree views of the city. Fun fact: This condo is higher than the Empire State Building, a sight that you’ll marvel at from the nearly floor-to-ceiling windows.

 

New York 3 Most expensive condos

3. Magazine-worthy Loft in an Artsy Neighborhood

$65,000,000

With its art galleries and thriving dining scene, SoHo has long been the neighborhood of choice for the lovers of culture. Slightly more down-to-earth architecture is the norm in SoHo — like the five-story building where you’ll find this updated four-bedroom, seven-bathroom updated condo. Every inch was redesigned by Roman & Williams, the interior design firm that counts celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow and Kate Hudson among its clientele. But, the best features are outside: There are approximately seven terraces (one with a TV alcove) and a rear yard.

 

Philadelphia 1 Most expensive condos

4. Customizable Condo Near a City Landmark

$14,000,000

Old meets new at this 9,515-square-foot penthouse at the sleek Ritz-Carlton Residences. It’s located right across the street from Philadelphia’s most beautiful structures — the wedding cake-like City Hall. This is a condo building with all the perks of a luxury hotel, from the ability to order room service from the Ritz-Carlton whenever the whim strikes, to the use of a chauffeured car. However, the design and features of the penthouse itself are entirely up to you. Go ahead, dream big.

 

Most-Expensive-Condos-Philadelphia-PA

5. Sleek New Construction in a Historic Neighborhood

$6,959,000

History abounds in Philadelphia, especially in the area of Society Hill. That’s where you’ll find Independence Hall, the site where the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were signed and adopted. Steps away is the brand new 500 Walnut residential tower, home to a 4,300-square-foot condo that comes with its own architect so you can put your own spin on the space. Before you move in, give yourself a housewarming gift of an electric car — one of the building’s many amenities is an induction-powered charging pad that’ll charge up your battery sans plug.

 

Most expensive condos Philadelphia 3

6. Bright and Airy Condo Built for Entertaining

$5,800,000

The Rittenhouse Square neighborhood is a bit quieter than other parts of the city, with upscale boutiques and restaurants alongside handsome, old townhomes. You’d have a great view of it all from this warm and inviting four-bedroom, three-bathroom condo. Though it’s already a roomy 4,166 square feet, the unit also has a private terrace off the dining room that’s big enough for entertaining. Rainy? Take the party back indoors to your own private screening room.

 

Boston 1 Most expensive condos

7. Ultra-modern Penthouse that Blends Indoor and Outdoor Living

$18,000,000

Though it’s technically a condo, this four-bedroom, five-bathroom residence is more like a sky mansion. Found at the very top of the Archer, the penthouse looks a lot like the kind of sleek, flat-roofed luxury homes usually found in Los Angeles. The design approach does feel a bit Hollywood as well, with 5,998-square-foot interior living space opening up (via floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors) to more than 2,326 square feet of outdoor space. Yes, there’s a pool and hot tub out there, too.

 

Boston 2 Most expensive condos

8. Opulent Flat in a Historic Mansion

$15,995,000

If your taste in architecture favors the more traditional, Boston isn’t short on grand old homes that date back to the 1800s. This four-bedroom, six-bath condo in a circa-1852 estate gives you all the benefits of historic mansion living, with an updated interior that suits a more modern lifestyle. Meaning, the kitchen and baths are huge, but you still have old-timey details to appreciate, like a solarium. While you may not have a yard, you do have the Boston Public Garden outside your front door.

 

Boston 3 Most expensive condos

9. Sunny Condo Near Boston’s Best Shopping

$13,500,000

With its “front-to-back” layout, this high-up three-bedroom, four-bathroom residence is the very, very upscale take on a railroad apartment. All the rooms flow together, so the natural light from the floor-to-ceiling windows shines throughout the entire condo. It comes pre-decorated by the renowned interior designer William Hodgins, who popularized open, uncluttered designs. That means you won’t need to shop at the boutiques found below on Boston’s iconic shopping stretch Newbury Street to fill your home with beautiful things — but hey, why not do it anyway?

 

San Francisco 1 Most expensive condos

10. Gallery-like Residence with Unbeatable Views

$14,750,000

With its elaborate columns and carvings, the entryway of this luxury condo building might lead you to believe the interiors will be similarly ornate. You’d be very wrong. The four-bedroom, three-and-a-half bathroom penthouse has a more minimalist aesthetic, reminiscent of an art gallery. It puts the focus on the cityscape you’ll enjoy from every window. There’s no better way to see the Golden Gate Bridge, Alcatraz, the Marin Headlands, and the Bay Bridge all at once.

 

Most expensive condos San Francisco 2

11. Worldly Two-bedroom in a Groundbreaking Building

$14,500,000

The 181 Fremont might have taken more than five years to complete, but this gleaming condo building was worth the wait. (It has the unusual bragging right of the deepest foundation in the city, setting a new standard for safety.) Here, you’ll find a 3,368-square-foot residence that might set a new trend for interiors. Its eclectic finishes came from all over the world — marble from Italy, Pladao wood doors from New Guinea, and the bronze entry door hardware is from Paris.

 

San Francisco 3 Most expensive condos

12. Elegant Penthouse Surrounded by the City

$11,700,000

Situated 400 feet above Union Square, in this three-bedroom, four-and-a-half-bathroom penthouse you can overlook much of the city from virtually any window. If the tastefully neutral interiors bring to mind those found in a luxury hotel, you’d be correct. That’s because the 3,830-square-foot unit is a Four Seasons Private Residence. It’s kind of like living on vacation.

 

Los Angeles 1 Most expensive condos

13. Double Penthouse with a Bonus Apartment

$48,888,888

Everything’s a bit more over-the-top in the City of Angels, and luxury real estate is no exception. This mid-century tower, located near Beverly Hills, is home to the most expensive condo in the city: a 7,000-square-foot double penthouse with a 3,000-square-foot terrace. It’s the billionaire’s version a “fixer upper” in that it’s currently unfinished. If you have the happy problem of needing somewhere to live while making this your dream penthouse, don’t worry. This property also comes with a one-bedroom apartment and a studio.

 

Los Angeles 2 Most expensive condos

14. Deco-inspired Two-bedroom in the Heart of the City

$29,900,000

If Jay Gatsby lived in modern-day Los Angeles, he’d call this place home. Though this two-bedroom, four-bathroom condo was built in 2010, it’s designed to evoke the glamour of the 1920s and 30s. Each room has a different theme, with mood lighting to match — and the most over-the-top room might be the black-and-gold master bath, complete with coordinating black marble.

 

Los Angeles 3 Most expensive condos

15. Neutral Penthouse Fit for a Style Icon

$16,500,000

Though it’s located inland (between Century City and UCLA), this towering three-bedroom, five-bathroom penthouse is high enough to have views all the way across the city to the ocean. However, the vista isn’t even the most notable feature of this white-and-beige unit, despite the 1,800-square-foot terrace that looks straight from a boutique hotel. Nope, that honor goes to the custom closet. Kitted out with glass doors and a shoe wall, it’s a style-lover’s dream.

 

Seattle 1 Most expensive condos

16. Downtown Condo with Peaceful Mountain Views

$12,500,000

For nature-loving city-dwellers, this condo has it all. This impeccably decorated two-bedroom, three-bathroom flat is a stone’s throw away from Seattle’s famous Pike Place Market, yet looks out onto the gorgeous Puget Sound, Mt. Rainier, and the Olympic Mountains. It’s a view you can enjoy while grilling your farmer’s market catch of the day, thanks to the outdoor barbecue located on one of two terraces.

 

Seattle 3 Most expensive condos

17. Open-concept Penthouse with a Bonus-packed Rooftop

$3,999,000

Sure, views of mountains and sunsets are nice, but sometimes, you just want the ultimate in luxury. This two-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bathroom penthouse is ideal for those whose idea of communing with nature is admiring a countertop made of fine stone. The four-car garage (a rare find in Seattle) can accommodate your fantasy car collection, and the condo building itself will happily secure your wine collection. Take your best bottle up to your private rooftop terrace, which packs in a Viking mini-kitchen, spa, and a fire pit.

 

18. Glass Aerie That Puts the City at Your Feet

When money is no object, you can indulge in fun features that are only for occasional use. For instance, having an unsheltered, open-air hot tub in a city that’s famous for constant rain. This is just what you’ll find off the patio of this two-bedroom, two-bathroom penthouse condo, along with other fair-weather comforts like an outdoor kitchen and fireplace. Most of the year, however, you’d still be able to get the illusion of outdoor living thanks to the glass walls that surround the designer interior with panoramic skyline views.

 

Chicago 2 Most expensive condos

19. Spacious Double Unit Near a Chicago Icon

$11,000,000

It’s two condos for one with this purchase, which adds up to a whole floor to call your own near Willis Tower (aka Sears Tower). When combined, you’ll have a five-bedroom, seven-bathroom residence that totals an impressive 8,200 square feet. As for what to do with all that space, perhaps the layout can offer clues. The condos were designed to have a museum-like presence, making it the perfect home for a burgeoning art collection.

 

Chicago 3 Most expensive condos

20. Designer Condo in an Upcoming Building

$10,368,390

Though it won’t be ready until 2020, Chicago’s third most expensive condo promises to be a standout. The Sky 360 Residences of Vista Tower is going to be the newest addition to the Chicago skyline, and the interiors promise to be as well-designed as the unusual tiered exterior of the building. In this proposed five-bedroom, six-bathroom condo, your future self would get to enjoy motorized kitchen cabinets, full-height stone walls throughout the unit, and a heated bathroom floor that’ll take the chill out of those Chicago winters.

 

21. A Curated 4-Bedroom in an Architectural Masterpiece

When it opens in 2020, the Vista Tower skyscraper will be the third-tallest in the city—and also the tallest structure in the world designed by a woman. It’s the work of Jeanne Gang, who also won a MacArthur Genius Grand in 2011. In other words, living in the future Sky 360 Residents at Vista Tower comes with quite a bit of distinction. That’s before you even get to the impressive four-bedroom, five-bathroom condo you’d call home. Designed by Hirch Bedner Associates (a firm that specializes in five-star hotels), the interior combines stone walls, wide-plank wood floors, and hyper-modern cabinetry and appliances for an unusual mix of natural elements and cutting-edge tech.

 

Houston 1 Most expensive condos

22. Four-bedroom Condo in a Resort-like Building

$7,500,000

The peak of living large in Houston is at the brand-new River Oaks building, where the biggest price tag in the city will buy you a four-bedroom, six-bathroom condo that occupies 6,200 square feet. The 1,700-square-foot terrace gives you even more living space — but if it’s still not enough, that’s where the amenities come in. There are two picturesque pools anchored by contemporary artwork, an outdoor kitchen, and a pet spa with a dog park to let your pup get his energy out in comfort.

23. Custom, Floor-sized Condo with a Formal Garden

$6,736,000

This unfinished, floor-sized condo gives you 9,294-square-feet to design to your specifications, which could accommodate a six-bedroom, six-bathroom condo. There are at least eight areas that likely won’t need a full renovation, though: the eight terraces found on each side of your floor, which just require some luxury lounge furniture. And if you love to look upon perfectly-manicured trees and landscaping, you’re in luck — the building has its own formal gardens.

Houston 3 Most expensive condos

24. Sophisticated Urban Oasis with an Infinity Pool

$4,225,000

A little bit of New York City came to Houston in 2015 in the form of the Arabella, the sister building to luxury high rises in the Big Apple. Here, you’ll find a four-bedroom, six-bathroom condo with of-the-moment design touches like lacquered cabinets. But the ultimate luxury is right off the balcony, in the form of a private pool with soaring views of the city.

 

Most expensive condos Miami 1

25. Glass “House” with Biscayne Bay Views

$25,000,000

If your home was made almost entirely of glass, you’d have to be very strategic with the location to maximize privacy. But in the case of this all-glass, six-bedroom, five-and-a-half bathroom penthouse, you’re so high up that you’re guaranteed privacy. Designed by architect Bjarke Ingels so that no internal structure obscures light, this modern take on a solarium is for the style minimalist with a maximalist budget. In addition to luxe features like a chef’s kitchen, there’s a 3,000-bottle wine room and a rooftop “moonlight cinema.”

 

Miami 2 Most expensive condos

26. All-season Living at an Exclusive Building

$22,000,000

Miami is the rare place where you could have an equal amount of outdoor and interior space and get plenty of year-round use out of each. This five-bedroom, six-bathroom duplex condo splits the difference with 5,000-square-feet of living space and 5,000-square feet of terraces. The high price isn’t just for the amount of room you’ll get, but also due to the exclusivity of the building. At Beach House 8 — with only eight full-floor condos — an opening is a rare find. In addition to your two floors, you’ll find a third level with an infinity pool.

 

Miami 3 Most expensive condos

27. All-white Condo by the Ocean

$21,500,000

Located just north of Miami, Surfside is an upscale neighborhood within the city limits — though it has a less flashy atmosphere. (The mayor has been known to skateboard around town.) The Surf Club Four Seasons is indicative of that luxurious-yet-laid-back vibe, with condos that offer high-end amenities without a lot of over-the-top glitz. This four-bedroom, seven-bathroom furnished condo has an all-white interior that puts the focus on its best feature — an expansive ocean view.

 

Clearly, the most expensive condos in America vary greatly based on price, location, and style. With so many diverse options, which condo would you choose as your dream home? Let us know in the comments!

The post The Most Expensive Condos in America appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

No Regrets: 4 Ways to Find the Right Neighborhood

House hunters tend to focus on, well, the house. Extra bedrooms, an updated kitchen, a dreamy patio—these things may boost your future happiness while you’re at home, but what about when you walk out the front door?

It’s easy to forget to evaluate the whole neighborhood during a home search, and this can lead to neighborhood regret. According to a recent Trulia survey, 36 percent of respondents would move to a different neighborhood than their current one if given the chance. And that number goes up based on location and age. Forty-two percent of San Franciscans experience neighborhood regret, versus 35 percent of Austinites, and 42 percent of people 18 to 29 reported regret, compared with 28 percent of those 50 and older.

There may not be much you can do about your city—and even less you can do about your age—but there are other ways to up your odds of loving your new neighborhood.

Here are four ways to avoid neighborhood regret:

Put “the right neighborhood vibe” on your must-have list next to number of bedrooms during your home search. Do you want a quiet, family-friendly cul-de-sac full of minivans? Or lively, walkable, urban block flush with entertainment options?

Screening for the right vibe can vastly improve your chances of avoiding neighborhood regret. Fifty-five percent of people who are currently happy with their neighborhood were significantly influenced by the vibe of the neighborhood when selecting their house, compared with only 36 percent of people with neighborhood regret.

How do you do it? There are a million ways to figure it out, but luckily, you don’t have to do it on your own. Trulia has an amenities section on every neighborhood page. Check it out to see if the neighborhood you are looking at it is heavy on nightlife or mom-and-pop shops, depending on your preferences.

Neighborhood regret is more likely to happen when homebuyers don’t have access to accurate information about a prospective neighborhood. For example, 22 percent thought the vibe was oversold. Features like “vibe” are pretty subjective, so you’ll want to check it out yourself rather than take a listing’s or agent’s word for it.

Of course, you don’t always have time to visit a dozen neighborhoods during a home search—or even one if you’re shopping from afar. Fortunately, Trulia Neighborhoods includes neighborhood photo galleries to help you out (currently available only in San Francisco, Austin, and Chicago, but we’ll be launching in more metros soon). Whether you use the original photos to narrow your search down to a couple of neighborhoods to check out, or to scope out a community from across the country, the virtual tour is the next best thing to being there yourself.

If you get the chance to spend time in a prospective neighborhood, get friendly. Strike up a conversation with pedestrians, baristas, and neighbors about what they think the neighborhood is like. Many of neighborhood regretters’ complaints are things that may be hard to spot during a quiet stroll. Thirty-three percent of them dislike the lack of social activity in their neighborhoods, while 30 percent complain of street noise, and 28 percent are unhappy about unfriendly neighbors.

Trulia makes the task much easier with crowdsourced reviews by your future neighbors our What Locals Say section. Want to know how your pets or kids will fit into the community? With one click, you can sort reviews by dog owners and parents to see what they have to say.

 

It’s hard to beat safety and school quality in neighborhood must-haves. And yet, 21 percent of neighborhood regretters believe the school quality in their area was oversold. Problem solved: Trulia Neighborhoods includes detailed information about crime and schools, including a crime risk map, what locals say about safety, school ratings, and school reviews by parents. With such important information, nothing compares to hearing from those who already live there.

You can knock down walls and repaint your new home all you want, but when it comes to your neighborhood, you take it as it is. But if you choose the right one, that can be great news. Follow these tips, and you can find a neighborhood that feels like home.

The post No Regrets: 4 Ways to Find the Right Neighborhood appeared first on Trulia's Blog.